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Lava Flow Estimated to Cross Highway 130 in Two Weeks

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs and Department of Land and Natural Resources announce the immediate closure of Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, until further notice, due to the hazards associated with the June 27 lava flow. Wao Kele o Puna is owned by OHA and managed by DLNR.

I would hardly call it a crime scene!

I would hardly call it a crime scene!

Kamana‘opono Crabbe, Ka Pouhana, OHA (Chief Executive Officer) said, “It is prudent at this time to close Wao Kele o Puna due to lava activity and subsequent unsafe conditions.

William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR Chairperson said, “We join with Hawaii Civil Defense and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to warn the public of extreme danger from lava flowing through cracks in Wao Kele O Puna, and Kahauale’a Natural Area Reserve. Both areas are off-limits to all persons. We will prosecute anyone entering these areas for any purpose, including unauthorized lava sightseeing tours. Hikers have been lost or injured in these areas, and personnel called in to rescue them have also been put in danger.”

The Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will be assisting Hawaii County to build the alternate roads in Puna.

Lava is estimated to cross Highway 130 in approximately two weeks if it stays on its current path.

DOFAW will provide a D8 bulldozer and equipment operator to Nanawale/Railroad Ave. tomorrow and expect work will take several weeks. Portions of the old railroad right-of-way run through state forest and unencumbered lands. Railroad Ave. bisects Nanawale state Forest Reserve

Lava Flow Update – Kilauea Continues to Erupt

Kīlauea continued to erupt at its summit and within the East Rift Zone, and gas emissions remained elevated. Summit tilt showed inflation over the past day, and the lava lake level fluctuated due to spattering. At the middle East Rift Zone, the front of the June 27th flow continued advancing eastward, and surface breakouts also remain active closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Click to Enlarge

Live Panorama of Puʻu ʻŌʻō North Flank from the North Rim [PNcam] Last Updated 2014-09-05 14:25:14 (HST) Click to Enlarge

June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. An HVO overflight yesterday afternoon observed lava continuing to issue onto the surface from a ground crack, and moving slowly through thick forest. The most distant active lava was approximately 13.3 km (8.3 miles) from the vent and 1.2 km (0.7 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. Another overflight is scheduled for this morning and an updated map will be posted later today.

Small breakouts also remain active closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, and there was no significant change overnight based on webcam views. Some of these breakouts are also creeping into the forest and producing smoke plumes.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: There was no significant change in tilt at Puʻu ʻŌʻō over the past day. Glow was visible overnight above several outgassing openings in the crater floor. Aerial views this week have found small lava ponds within the northeast, southeast, and north pits in the crater, and a crusted pond surface in the southeast pit. A small amount of lava was erupted from the north pit last night onto the crater floor. The most recent sulfur-dioxide emission-rate measurement for the East Rift Zone was 400 tonnes per day (from all sources) on September 2, 2014.

Lava Flow Map Updated – Flow Advances/Cascading Into Deep Crack

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 1, 2014.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The area of the flow as mapped on August 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 1 is shown in red. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the distal end of the flow, where lava in the forest had reached 12.6 km (7.8 miles) from the vent. Most lava at the far end of the flow, however, was cascading into a deep ground crack (brown line), which was steaming at the surface. The most distant steam, which may represent the leading end of the lava in the crack, was 12.9 km (7.9 miles) from the vent and 1.7 km (1.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line within the flow marks the lava tube.

Hawaii Lava Flow Update – Lava Resurfaces Along Crack

Lava resurfaces along crack, continues advancing through thick forest

The leading edge of the June 27th lava flow plunged into a deep crack on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone last week, and lava within the crack remained hidden for several days.

Over the past day, lava returned to the surface at a point slightly farther along the crack, creating a small island of lava surrounded by thick forest. Click to enlarge

Over the past day, lava returned to the surface at a point slightly farther along the crack, creating a small island of lava surrounded by thick forest. Click to enlarge

The farthest tip of the flow today was 11.4 km (7.1 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.1 km (1.9 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

A view of the small pad of lava that has emerged from the crack over the past day. The lava pad was about 800 m (0.5 miles) long, and was about 1.3 km (0.8 miles) east of the point where lava plunged into the crack. Click to enlarge

A view of the small pad of lava that has emerged from the crack over the past day. The lava pad was about 800 m (0.5 miles) long, and was about 1.3 km (0.8 miles) east of the point where lava plunged into the crack. Click to enlarge

Another view of the isolated pad of lava that has emerged from the crack. This view is towards the east, along the East Rift Zone.

The spot at which lava flowed into the crack is to the west, out of view beyond the bottom of the photograph. Click to enlarge

The spot at which lava flowed into the crack is to the west, out of view beyond the bottom of the photograph. Click to enlarge

View of the pad of lava with the equivalent view from a thermal camera.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains partly obscured by thick fume.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

In particular, the northeastern portion of the crater (bottom left part of image) has recently been entirely obscured to the naked eye, but the thermal camera provides a clear view through the fume, revealing a small lava pond.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge