• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    July 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  

A Private Tour Aboard US Navy Ship the USS Lake Erie

On Monday, December 23rd, I was given the opportunity to get a private tour aboard the US Navy Ship the USS Lake Erie with James and Phyllis Tucker (my uncle and aunt) that were celebrating their 50th anniversary and renewing their wedding vows the following day.

My Uncle and Aunt on the back end of the USS Lake Erie.

My Uncle and Aunt on the back end of the USS Lake Erie. (Click to enlarge)

I began the day with giving them a tour of Pearl Harbor.  One thing I learned is that if you want to catch that first boat out to the USS Arizona Memorial… you need to be at Pearl Harbor very early.

At Pearl Harbor.  USS Arizona Memorial in background. (Click to enlarge)

At Pearl Harbor. USS Arizona Memorial in background. (Click to enlarge)

Unfortunately, we arrived at Pearl Harbor around 8:00 and when we got our tickets to go out to the USS Arizona the time of our departure was 12:45 in the afternoon so instead of visiting the Arizona Memorial we just cruised around Pearl Harbor.

Checking out WWII displays.

Checking out WWII displays.  (Click to enlarge)

At 10:30 I had an appointment set up with a Public Affairs Officer to meet with them at the Navy’s Pass and ID Gate.  We arrived their shortly after 10:00 and let them know that we were waiting for them at the location agreed upon.  My Uncle, Aunt and I then climbed into a Navy van where we were lead into the confines of Pearl Harbor.  I had not told my Uncle or Aunt what we were about to do previously, however, I did tell them to be prepared and wear some walking shoes.

Life on board a Navy ship requires a lot of walking and going up and down ladders and stairs.

Life on board a Navy ship requires a lot of walking and going up and down ladders and stairs

As we arrived at the USS Lake Erie my uncle said “That’s a big ship!”.  At this point I broke the news to them that we were getting a private invitation aboard the ship and I don’t know what they were thinking but I know my uncle was pretty excited about it.

Signing in to the ship and showing ID.

Signing in to the ship and showing ID

We signed in with Navy personnel fronting the ship and showed them are identification so that we could get boarding passes and then quickly made our way aboard the ship.

Learning first hand about the capabilities of the ship.

Learning first hand about the capabilities of the ship

We met Lt. Hillenbrand on board the ship and he told us that he would act as our escort around the boat.  We started at the front of the ship where Lt. Hillenbrand talked to us about the fighting capabilities of the ship and a little history about the ship.

"That's a big gun" said James Tucker.

“That’s a big gun” said James Tucker

USS Lake Erie (CG-70) is a Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser of the United States Navy, named after the U.S. Navy’s decisive victory in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. She is the first U.S. Navy ship to be commissioned in Hawaii.  Lake Erie’s motto, “Courage, Determination, Peace,” honors the memory of the men who fought the Battle of Lake Erie and Mrs. Margaret Meyer. Courage to fight, Determination to win, with Peace as the ultimate goal.”

We had the first hand opportunity to see the upkeep of the ship that is done by the sailors as folks were grinding away rust and painting the ship… some folks literally using small brushes to get in the tiniest of spots.

The Commander of the Ship told us “If we take care of the ship… the ship will take care of us”.

The Commander of the Ship told us “If we take care of the ship… the ship will take care of us”

At ll:00 we made our way to the entrance of the ship as Lieutenant Commander Troy Noonen was awarded a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his time served aboard the ship as this would be his last day on the ship after serving on her for since May of 2011.

The Commander gives Lt. Noonen a certificate for his time aboard the ship.

The Commander gives Lt. Noonen a certificate for his time aboard the ship

Seeing Lt. Noonen off of the ship:

Lt. Noonens last moment on USS Lake Erie.

Lt. Noonen’s last moment on USS Lake Erie

We then continued on with our tour of the ship where we got to see the helicopter pad and where they store the helicopter and they explained how the helicopter was brought inside of the ship when not in use.

The helicopter pad.

The helicopter pad

We then moved to the bridge of the ship where we got to see where the ship is steered from… of course my uncle wanted to sit in the “Captain’s Chair”!  They talked to us about the general characteristics of the ship and how it was steered and what each seat was for within the bridge.

"You think the Captain would mine if I sat in his chair?"

“You think the Captain would mind if I sat in his chair?”

My uncle, aunt and I all learned a lot about the ship on our brief time above her.  I of course couldn’t get off the ship w/out landing another coin for my collection!

At the helm of the USS Lake Erie

At the helm of the USS Lake Erie

Here is a video of what they did back in September:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/pLnQ4SxTOQU]

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Pacific Command, and U.S. Navy sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie (CG 70) successfully conducted a flight test today of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system, resulting in the intercept of a complex separating short-range ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean by the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and a Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB guided missile.
At approximately 2:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (8:30 p.m. EDT), a complex separating short-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii. The target flew northwest towards a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean. Following target launch, the USS Lake Erie detected and tracked the missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, developed a fire control solution and launched two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles to engage the target. The first SM-3 that was launched successfully intercepted the target warhead. This was the first salvo mission of two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles launched against a single separating target. Official U.S. Navy Video courtesy Missile Defense Agency www.mda.mil

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Vintage Warbirds Make Historic Landing on Ford Island Runway – Navy Assists With Fly In

In preparation for their December 7th flyover ceremonies at the USS Arizona Memorial and for Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s 7th Anniversary gala fundraiser tonight, two vintage warbirds made a historic landing on Ford Island Runway today at 9am. Navy runway #04/22 has been closed to air traffic for years. The Navy assisted in this fly in today.

Warbirds1

At approximately 9am, Bruce Mayes of Pacific Warbirds piloted his North American SNJ T-6 Texan on to the Ford Island Runway  followed by Harry Greene in his Boeing Stearman PT-17, landing about 9:15am.

Warbirds4

Both warbirds will be standing guard at Hangar 37 tonight at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s 7th Anniversary fundraiser gala “Some Enchanted Evening.” 450 guests are expected to attend. Loretta Ables Sayre will entertain. Dan Cooke is emcee. The event is to raise funds for the Museum’s Education and Restoration projects.

Warbirds3

“We’re honored to have these great warbirds gracing our event tonight,” said Museum Executive Director Ken DeHoff. “It’s a wonderful sight to see them in the air over Ford Island and landing on historic Ford Island Runway.”

Warbirds2

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, which depends on membership and donations for its support. A Smithsonian affiliate Museum, it is also rated one of the top 10 aviation attractions nationally by TripAdvisor. Located at 319 Lexington Boulevard, Historic Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Honolulu, Hawaii 96818. 808-441-1000.

 

Commemorating the 72nd Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor

A series of events will be held on December 7, 2013 to commemorate the 72nd Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor. Listings are below.

USS Arizona Memorial

USS Arizona Memorial

December 5th – 7th Anniversary Dinner Gala: “Some Enchanted Evening,” 5:30 to 9:30pm at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor. A fundraiser for the Museum.

December 7th Events at World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

USS Arizona Ceremony, 7:45am, Pearl Harbor Visitor Center, free admission. Attendees should arrive at World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument by 6:30am at the latest. This year’s keynote is Secretary Max Cleland of the American Battle Monuments Commission. Parking is available at WWII National Monument/Arizona Memorial or at Richardson Field near Aloha Stadium with free shuttles to Pearl Harbor. Visit www.PacificHistoricParks.org for more information.

Moment of Silence, 7:55am

"Tears of the Arizona" - Oil still leaks to this day

“Tears of the Arizona” – Oil still leaks to this day

Blackened Canteen Ceremony, 1:40pm, aboard USS Arizona Memorial. Dr. Hiroya Sugano M.D., Director General of the Zero Fighter Admirers Club, will honor fallen Japanese and American soldiers with this ceremony, held annually since 1945. Two Army Air Force B-29s collided and crashed during a bombing raid over Shizuoka, Japan in June 1945. The event killed 23 Americans and over 2,000 Japanese. The canteen was pulled from the wreckage–the same canteen

Dr. Sugano uses to pour whiskey into the waters of Pearl Harbor as a symbol of peace, honor, and reconciliation. Admiral Ronald J. Hays, USN (Ret.) Chairman of the Board at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, will accompany Dr. Sugano in this commemoration ceremony.

Prior to the ceremony students from Nagaoka, Japan will meet with Pacific Aviation Museum Pear Harbor Executive Director Ken DeHoff and Dr. Sugano for a roundtable discussion at the Museum. The Japanese students, accompanied by a Nagaoka City representative, are participating in an educational and cultural exchange between Nagaoka City and Honolulu. Visit http://www.PacificAviationMuseum.org for more information.

The Museum Store and Laniakea Café restaurant are unique in their offerings and their 1940s ambiance. Laniakea Café will be open from 9am-4pm. Located in the air-conditioned Hangar 37. Breakfast, lunch, snacks, and beer and wine are available. Phone (808) 441-1000 or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org for tickets and more information. Tickets and a free Flight Simulator coupon are available online.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, which depends on membership and donations for its support. A Smithsonian affiliate Museum, it is also rated one of the top 10 aviation attractions nationally by TripAdvisor. Located at 319 Lexington Boulevard, Historic Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Honolulu, Hawaii 96818.

 

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor to Commemorate The Battle of Midway With Shattered Sword Author Jonathan Parshall

Marking the 71st Anniversary of the “turning point in the Pacific” epic battle, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor will present a special program featuring Jonathan Parshall, co-author of Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway, Tuesday, June 4.

Shattered Sword The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway

The event is free to Museum Members and $25 for non-members. It will feature a Book Signing and Meet the Author at 4pm, a Reception at 5:30PM, and “The 71st Anniversary of the Battle of Midway” Presentation by Mr. Parshall at 6:30pm with a question and answer period following.

Jonathan Parshall’s interest in the Imperial Japanese Navy developed in childhood. He has written for the U.S. Naval War College Review, Naval Institute Proceedings, and World War II magazine, and has contributed to several books on the topic. In 1995 he founded www.combinedfleet.com, the foremost Internet site on the Imperial Navy. He was a member of a 1999 expedition by Nauticos Corporation and the Naval Oceanographic Office that discovered wreckage from the carrier Kaga, sunk at Midway.

According to Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Executive Director Kenneth DeHoff, “Author Jonathan Parshall is the foremost authority on Midway. We’re very excited to have him as our keynote speaker for this year’s Midway commemoration.”

Tickets are online at PacificAviationMuseum.org or available at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. RSVPs are required by May 28 and seating is limited. For more information, call 808-441-1007 or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, a Smithsonian Affiliate Museum and 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, is open 9am to 5pm daily and is accessed by shuttles from the USS Arizona Memorial Pearl Harbor Visitor Center at Pearl Harbor. www.PacificAviationMuseum.org, 808-441-1000.

 

 

Big Island Students and Teachers Go to Flight School at the Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Flight School is back at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor January 16~18 and more popular than ever as 30 middle school girls and four teachers from Ka’u High School on the Big Island of Hawaii become the first Neighbor Islanders to experience this unique new aviation adventure.

The 6th, 7th and 8th graders and their educators will spend three days exploring the history and technology of aviation in a fun and engaging new Museum program which began last summer, graduating three winged classes in 2012. The Big Island students will be the first students outside of O`ahu to enjoy this program for young aviators-in-training.

Sixth through eighth grade female students have the opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new “Flight School” program this summer. Developed by Director of Education Dr. Shauna Tonkin, the Museum’s program introduces girls to the history and science of flight.

Sixth through eighth grade female students have the opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new “Flight School” program this summer. Developed by Director of Education Dr. Shauna Tonkin, the Museum’s program introduces girls to the history and science of flight.

Flight School is made possible by grants from the Marguerite Gambo Wood Foundation and the Bill Healy Foundation. Hawaiian Airlines is a sponsor.

“Flight School is a top-notch educational series,” said Pacific Aviation Museum Executive Director Kenneth DeHoff. “It makes great strides in engaging with and introducing the next generation to the fascinating world of aviation.”

Girls learn the basics of flight through demonstrations and experiments, tour historic aircraft, fly remote control planes, and “take to the skies” in the Museum’s flight simulation lab. Students meet historic pioneers of aviation through presentations made by costumed interpreters such as Amelia Earhart and Rosie the Riveter.

“This is a hands-on program that introduces girls to the heroes and pioneers of aviation, and helps them consider future careers in science, technology, engineering and math,” explains Dr. Shauna Tonkin who, as Director of Education at the Museum, developed the curriculum.

Ka’u High students and teachers will shift from air to sea for a well-rounded historical perspective of Pearl Harbor, as the three-day Flight School is conducted in cooperation with USS Battleship Missouri Memorial. Students will participate in the Missouri’s popular two-night encampment program and visit the USS Arizona Memorial.

Flight School for Girls 2

Upon successful completion of Flight School, the students celebrate with a Winging Ceremony.

For more information, contact Dr. Shauna Tonkin at ShaunaT@PacificAviationMuseum.org or 808-441-1005.

Flight School for Girls repeats: June 18~20, July 16~18, and July 24~26. Flight School for Boys will be held June 4~6 and June 25~27. Advanced Flight School for Girls will be held July 9~11.

 

National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks Sponsor First-Ever Reading Aloud Event

National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks Sponsor First-Ever December 7th Reading Aloud Event with 6,000-Plus Students across Hawaii—11 Big Island School Participate

Every December 7th, thousands of people from around the world gather at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center in Honolulu to pay tribute to the thousands of military service members and civilians who lost their lives in the name of freedom in 1941.  For the few surviving Pearl Harbor survivors who are able to make the trek to this sacred place, their message to future generations is clear:  Remember Pearl Harbor, the tremendous sacrifice that was made that day, and the terrible consequences of war.

USS Ronald Reagan

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (Aug. 31, 2011) Sailors and Marines render honors as the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) passes the USS Arizona Memorial while entering Pearl Harbor for a port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin B. Gray

For the first time ever, the National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks shared the historical significance of that day with 6,000-plus school-age children across Hawaii with a simultaneous reading aloud program at 3 p.m. on December 7.

Through the Department of Education’s and the Island of Hawaii YMCA’s A+ Afterschool Care Programs, Big Island students at 11 schools joined their peers from across the state in learning about the real life story of an unlikely friendship between the late Pearl Harbor Survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese Fighter Pilot Zenji Abe.

Thousands of elementary and intermediate school children in A+ Afterschool Care Programs heard the true life story of an unlikely friendship between Pearl Harbor survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese diver-bomb pilot Zenji Abe through the reading of “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”

Thousands of elementary and intermediate school children in A+ Afterschool Care Programs heard the true life story of an unlikely friendship between Pearl Harbor survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese diver-bomb pilot Zenji Abe through the reading of “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”

Participating Hawaii Island schools included De Silva Elementary, Keaukaha Elementary, St. Joseph School, Keaau Elementary, Honokaa Elementary, Waimea Elementary, Kohala Elementary, Kealakehe Elementary, Holualoa Elementary, Kamehameha Schools and the YMCA’s Club Y Teens program.

The children’s book, entitled “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship,” is a story of peace and forgiveness and how these men, who were once enemies of war, overcame their hatred and fear for one another.

“As stewards of the USS Arizona Memorial and World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, the National Park Service’s mission is to preserve and share the history of the Pacific War, including what took place at Pearl Harbor 71 years ago,” said National Park Service Superintendent Paul DePrey.

“Sharing the message of peace and reconciliation amongst thousands of young children across Hawaii is significant.  The story of Richard Fiske and Zenji Abe is proof that through friendship and peace, we can make this a better world for future generations.”

Pearl Harbor Book

Pacific Historic Parks purchased 175 copies of the book to provide to each participating school. Pacific Historic Parks, a cooperating association that assists the National Park Service, supports the education, preservation, development and interpretation of four National Park-managed historic sites throughout the Pacific, including Pearl Harbor.

A marine bugler on the USS West Virginia, Fiske witnessed the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the massive destruction that happened at the hands of Japanese fighter pilots.  For many years, his heart was filled with anger and hatred for the Japanese and his health suffered because of this.  Hospitalized due to the stress of his anger, he knew he had to forgive the Japanese for what they had done in the name of war or face imminent death due to his failing health.  In 1991, during the 5oth Anniversary Pearl Harbor Symposium, Japanese Fighter Pilot Zenji Abe offered an apology for the attack to members of the Pearl Harbor Survivors and extended his hand in friendship.  Fiske accepted his apology and the two became friends. As a symbol of peace and friendship, Abe gave Fiske $300 and asked him to lay two roses at the Arizona Memorial each month, one for him and one for Fiske.  He also asked Fiske to play the taps on his bugle after he did this.  Fiske honored this request every month until he passed away in 2004.

“Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship” is a children’s book written by Pearl Harbor civilian survivor and author Dorinda Nicholson.  The book, which has won numerous national awards including the International Reading Association’s Children’s and Young Adult’s Book Award, is written as a correspondence between the author and her granddaughter, recounting the story of two World War II veterans—an American Marine and a Japanese pilot-—whose lives intersected in war at Pearl Harbor and again in reconciliation fifty years later.

Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School, reads “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”  Photo: Fern Gavelek Communications

Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School, reads “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.” Photo: Fern Gavelek Communications

“It’s a very inspirational book and the second time I read it, I cried,” says Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School. “The book makes the emotions of the characters come alive and illustrates the importance of forgiveness.”

Fifth grade student Anuhea Kainoa-Cho shared that the book had a good story and added, “I learned about protecting others and why people should make up when they disagree.”

Hakunani Anakalea reads to the students

“Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship,” can be purchased online at www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org, phone 1-888-485-1941. As part of its reading aloud program, the National Park Service has posted several other real life stories of Pearl Harbor survivors on their website for parents to read to their children.  Go to www.nps.gov/valr/forkids.

 Witness To History Videoconference Program

The National Park Service, with funding from Pacific Historic Parks, also offers a year round distance learning program for students and teachers from around the world.  Witness To History is a free program that utilizes videoconferencing technology to take students where visitors cannot go, bringing the sites and stories of Pearl Harbor to children and adults unable to visit Oahu.  The program includes a Pearl Harbor Survivor Series where participants can see and hear Pearl Harbor Survivors share their personal testimonies of what they experienced on that fateful day.  The Interpretive Ranger Series shows a video of a USS Arizona underwater dive while a National Park Ranger provides a voice-over interpretive lesson.  The program ends with a student and educator question and answer session.  For more information or to schedule a free Witness To History videoconference, contact 808-954-8744 or 808-4428.

 

Indonesian President Tours USS Arizona Memorial on Final Day of APEC Summit

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (Nov. 13, 2011) Commander, U.S. Pacific Command, Adm. Robert Willard describes the damage sustained by USS Arizona during the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor to the President of Indonesia, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. The Indonesian president toured the Arizona Memorial on the final day of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit here. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Danny Hayes)

Japanese Tea Ceremony for Peace Held on USS Arizona Memorial

Media Release:

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th grand tea master of the Urasenke School of Tea, performed a sacred Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial at the World War II Valor of the Pacific National Monument, July 19.

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th grand tea master of the Urasenke School of Tea, prepares sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

More than 200 Japanese and American guests gathered at the USS Arizona Memorial to witness Sen perform the centuries old tea ceremony. Due to the limited space, more than 300 attendees watched the event unfold at the World War II Valor of the Pacific National Monument theaters.

Guests and attendees applaud Pearl Harbor survivors Alfred Rodriguez, Ray Emory and Sterling Cale at a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in a spirit of respect, reconciliation and peace. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

In the spirit of reconciliation and peace, Sen, a veteran of WWII, dedicated a bowl of tea to the 1,177 deceased who are memorialized in the Shrine Room. The ceremony, also known as “Okenchashiki,” is a sacred tea ceremony to the spirits of the war dead for world peace, conducted without words or music, allows for all participants, regardless of language, nationality or religious beliefs, to share in a spiritual communion together.

Japanese guests listen to the interpreter during a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument to honor the men who died on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

“There’s a wonderful phrase in Japanese when translated means ‘One time, one chance, one time, one situation, one opportunity,” said Sen, through an interpreter. “Today, this sacred tea ceremony was important on many different levels. It was an offering of sacred tea to the souls who are lost on the USS Arizona. On another level, it was an apology of sorts, a deep regret of the incident and war. The third important message was ‘world peace’ that we all came together at a hallowed place in this sacred opportunity to pray for world peace.”

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, prepares sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Sen, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument to honor the men who died on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

During WWII, Sen was a pilot for the Japanese Navy who flew missions off the coast of Okinawa. As a veteran, Sen said the expeience made him truly believe the horrific nature of war.

“War is horrible,” said Sen. “But I also realize that one person alone cannot stop a war. We must all work together to stop war.”

Since 1950, Sen has visited more than 60 countries promoting the Japanese culture and performing tea ceremonies around the world. Sen has performed the tea ceremony for world figures such as First Lady Laura Bush, Princess Diana, former Premier of Russia, Gorbachov, and former Vice President Al Gore.

Adm. Patrick Walsh, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, speaks at a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico)

Attendees of the ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial included Pearl Harbor survivors Alfred Rogriguez, Sterling Cale and Ray Emory; Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Adm. Patrick Walsh; Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo of Japan; Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie; Pacific West Regional Director Christine Lenertz of the National Park Service; former Hawaii Gov. George Ariyoshi; and other dignitaries. The event was chaired by former First Lady of Hawaii, Jean Ariyoshi.

“I’m happy to have been invited to the tea ceremony,” said 89-year-old Cale. “It’s a good thing. I’m honored. I met a lot of people who I would not have met otherwise.”

Sixty-five years after the end of WWII, the United States and Japan have formed a new bilateral relationship of harmony and economic friendship.

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, offers sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Sen, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in a spirit of respect, reconciliation and peace. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

“Through this sacred ceremony on this hallowed setting, we honor the sacrifices of an extraordinary generation, which made possible the gift of peace to generations that followed,” said Walsh. “Today, our quintessential gifts have been the opportunity for a proud, strong relationship with our counterparts from the Japan Self-Defense Force.

“Earlier this year we learned about our strength and the endurance of our friendship. In times of crisis, in an hour of tragedy, at the moment of calamity, we learned about ourselves and the brotherhood of humanity,” said Walsh. “If history ever records a time and a place to learn about the commitment we make to our fellow man, it would be Japan in the days that followed March 11, 2011 where more people came to offer assistance than departed to avoid damage caused by the earthquake, tsunami and radioactive contamination.”

T-33 (T-Bird) Jet Trainer Arrived Today At Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Media Release:

The T-33—one of the world’s best known aircraft— joined the already extensive collection at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor today, Thursday, April 28, 2011. It was transferred from Honolulu Community College to Hangar 79, its final home at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor.

The T-33 (T-Bird)

The T-33 (T-Bird)

The T-33 (T-Bird) was the first jet trainer introduced to aid in the transition to jet aircraft. It was created from the F-80 fighter, by adding three feet to the fuselage, a second seat to the cockpit and six machine guns. Used as a trainer, it also was utilized for tasks such as drone director and target towing. The T-33 was thought to have an airframe that climbed faster, cruised more effortlessly and was slightly faster than its predecessors. Although the T-33 was initially utilized by the Army Air Force, a second version was created for the United States Navy titled TV-2.

The T-33 (T-Bird)

The T-33 (T-Bird)

According to Pacific Aviation Museum Executive Director Kenneth DeHoff,
“This T-33 is a wonderful trainer jet. It has been utilized at Honolulu Community College, and we are grateful to them for allowing us to move this aircraft to the Museum’s collection.” The T-33 will be available for visitors to view in Hangar 79, where the aircraft will undergo restoration by the Museum’s Lt. Ted Shealy Restoration Shop team.

The T-33 (T-Bird)

The T-33 (T-Bird)

Pacific Aviation Museum is open 9am to 5pm daily and is accessed by air conditioned shuttle buses from the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center at Pearl Harbor. Daily, visitors from all over the world view the vintage aircraft, enjoy hands on technology experiences including combat flight simulators, hear moving stories told by aviation-experienced docents, and see “The Day That Shall Live In Infamy” through historic films and audio. The Museum gift shop and restaurant are unique in their offerings and their authentic 1940s ambiance. Phone (808) 441-1000 or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org for tickets and more information.

Federal Government Shutdown Updates From USS Arizona Memorial, Battleship Missouri and the Pacific Avaiation Museum

Media Release:

In the event of a federal shutdown and closure of the National Parks Service-operated USS Arizona Memorial, the Battleship Missouri and Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor will continue to welcome visitors.

Inside the Pacific Aviation Museum

The regular free shuttle buses to the Battleship Missouri and Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor will remain operational, picking up from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center parking area.

No bags are allowed on the shuttle. Visitors may bring camera, wallet, cell phone, and water bottle on the shuttle.

Tickets for each attraction may be purchased at the attractions, upon arrival, online at PacificAviationMuseum.org, USSMissouri.org, or from Expedia and the tour desks in Waikiki.

The Museum is open 9am to 5pm daily. Call 808/441-1000 or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org for more information.

Helicopter Fly-ins Friday & Saturday at the Pacific Aviation Museum

Media Release:

Military helicopter fly-ins will open the aviation conference this weekend at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor. Then those in attendance can meet and greet the pilots and other conference participants. The fly-ins are scheduled for:

  • Friday, 8:30AM – US Army – OH58 and UH60 Blackhawk helicopters
  • Saturday, 9:30AM – US Coast Guard HH65 Dauphine to land

Young and old interested in aviation as a career or hobby will want to attend the Discovering Your Future in Aviation Conference at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 4, 5, and 6 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

 

UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter

It’s a weekend filled with hands-on workshops and seminars, a career fair, aviation films, interactive science exhibits, and the opportunity to talk one-on-one with aviation professionals and learn more about careers in aviation and the related sciences. The conference is free with Museum admission. Call 441-1008, email Tours@PacificAviationMuseum.org, or visit PacificAviationMuseum.org for tickets and more information.

 

US Coast Guard HH65 Dauphine

 

According to Executive Director Kenneth DeHoff, “The conference is designed to encourage young women and men to learn more about and pursue careers in aviation and other related sciences, and it gives students a great chance to network with aviation professionals.”

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is open 9am to 5pm daily and is accessed by air-conditioned shuttle buses from the USS Arizona Memorial Visitor Center at Pearl Harbor. Museum admission tickets are available online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org or at the Arizona Memorial Visitor Center. A free flight simulator coupon is available online.