UH Hilo Grad Student Awarded Prestigious APA Minority Fellowship

A graduate student in the MA program in Counseling Psychology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has been awarded the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship in the area of Services for Transition Age Youth. This is the first award of its kind for a student at UH Hilo. 

Rachel Gibson is a first-year graduate student whose specialization is in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. The APA Minority Fellowship provides financial support of up to $10,000 for one year, and is funded by a grant from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 

Gibson has a strong commitment to a career in mental health services and serving ethnic minority transition age youth and their families. Before entering the MA program, she worked with incarcerated and/or at-risk youth, particularly those from ethnic minority backgrounds, including Mexican American youths. Gibson noted that during this time, although most of her clients spoke proficient English, many of their families were Spanish-speaking. Gibson studied Spanish for six years and lived in a Spanish-speaking country for some time, which helped her greatly in connecting with the clients’ families.

“I’m very honored and humbled and am eager to get started with this Fellowship program,” Gibson said. “I see this as a tremendous opportunity to further my knowledge and skills and am grateful to APA for giving me this award.”

“The Fellowship is very prestigious and I’m so happy for Rachel,” said Dr. Bryan S. K. Kim, professor of psychology and director of the MA program. “The Fellowship is a testament to her commitment to addressing diversity issues in mental health and her past and present efforts in this area. 

“I interpret the Fellowship as an investment by APA in Rachel to be a leader in this underattended area of work in our communities,” he added. 

Kim will serve as a training mentor for Gibson per the Fellowship requirement.

UH’s 10 Campuses Move Summer Courses Online

Summer school at the 10 campuses of the University of Hawaiʻi will be held online, allowing students to continue their academic careers while staying safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first session runs from May 26 to July 3, and the second session runs from July 6 to August 14. The exact dates may vary slightly from campus to campus.

By May 15, the university will decide whether in-person classes will be added to the second summer session depending on the status of the COVID-19 health crisis. 

Summer registration begins on April 6 for UH West Oʻahu, UH Hilo, UH Maui College, Kapiʻolani Community College (CC), Leeward CC, Honolulu CC, Windward CC, Kauai CC and Hawaiʻi CC in Hilo. Registration is already underway for UH Mānoa with more than 450 UH Mānoa Summer Session courses being offered. 

“We have such a great range of course offerings during the summer session and we hope our students take advantage of the opportunity,” said UH Mānoa Provost Michael Bruno. “Everyone in the community is invited to take a class or two. With many of us confined to our homes, it is a great opportunity to begin work towards a degree or to take a course in an area of interest.” 

UH Extends Application Deadline to August 1

The University of Hawaiʻi is extending the deadline to apply for admissions to its three universities to August 1, 2020. This will give prospective students additional time to consider UH Mānoa, UH Hilo and/or UH West Oʻahu for the 2020–21 academic year under the new uncertainties associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Prospective students can apply to the seven UH Community Colleges right up to the start of the semester. Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible, particularly if they are interested in financial aid.

The announcement was made during a Wednesday, March 25 news conference by Gov. David Y. Ige, a UH graduate.

“For parents and students who are now thinking about staying home for college, you canʻt beat the opportunities across the University of Hawaiʻi System,” said UH President Lassner, adding that there is something for everyone at UH—from graduating high school seniors, to students on the mainland wanting to return home, to adults looking for improved economic opportunity through a career change.

“The UH system offers a wide range of amazing higher education programs across the state,” said Lassner. “Weʻre recognized around the world as affordable at every level, from our amazing community colleges to our welcoming baccalaureate universities to one of the world’s great research universities.”

Data show that people who earn a college degree or certificate earn more money over their lifetimes, are less likely to become unemployed in a recession, return to the workforce faster after a recession, live longer, live healthier, are less likely to become incarcerated, vote more, volunteer more, and their children are more likely to also pursue a higher education and experience these same benefits.

Go to the University of Hawaʻi application website for more information on how to apply. 

UH Campuses Closed to All Except Students & Employees

In response to the COVID-19 health crisis, the 10 campuses of the University of Hawaiʻi are closed, effective immediately, to everyone except current students and employees.

The UH campuses are UH Mānoa, UH Hilo, UH West Oʻahu, UH Maui College, Leeward Community College (CC), Kapiʻolani CC, Honolulu CC, Windward CC, Kauaʻi CC and Hawaiʻi CC.

This is the latest step being taken for the health and safety of UH students and employees. The university announced on March 18 that it is transitioning to an online delivery of courses for the remainder of the spring semester. The closure of public-facing facilities and establishment of a process for employees to work remotely from home are in effect. Employees who are working on campus and students who come to campus or reside in student housing are instructed to practice social distancing.

Messages from UH Hilo Chancellor Irwin on COVID-19

March 12, 2020

I encourage everyone to remain focused on the latest news and developments in order to be prepared for the potential impact it may have on us.

Dear UH Hilo ‘Ohana:

In the last few days, news surrounding COVID-19 has escalated dramatically. While we each do our best to keep healthy, support one another, and go on with our lives despite what is taking place globally, I encourage everyone to remain focused on the latest news and developments in order to be prepared for the potential impact it may have on us.

With that said, I have decided to postpone delivering the State of the University address, even electronically. I feel strongly that any remarks given during a time like this that don’t concentrate on COVID-19 are distracting from our immediate concerns.

UH Administration discusses every morning the latest developments to assess decisions we should make in response to concerns and events taking place. For the time being, I prefer my communication with all of you be concentrated on decisions made to ensure we all continue to be effective team members.

Once a new date is set for the State of the University address, which I still hope to deliver in person, you will be notified. In the meantime, I appreciate your understanding and continue to ask for your patience and cooperation as we get through this together, and intact.

Mahalo nui,

Bonnie D. Irwin

Message from UH President David Lassner about forthcoming COVID-19 changes

This message was shared with the students, faculty, and staff of the 10-campus University of Hawaiʻisystem on March 12, 2020.

Thanks to all of you who have shared questions and provided input over these last days. This has been a tumultuous week, with many changes in the COVID-19 situation in Hawaiʻi, across higher education and globally, accelerating into today.

I will send a longer message later today with more details. But at this point, I want to let you know that, out of concern for the safety of our students, faculty and staff, the University of Hawaiʻi will be moving our classes online after spring break, effective Monday, March 23. Other changes will also be announced.

Please stay tuned for more details.

Aloha,
David Lassner

UH Hilo HOSA Students Have Strong Performance at State Conference

Students from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo claimed top honors in various event categories at the 15th Annual Hawai’i HOSA – Future Health Professionals State Leadership Conference held recently on O`ahu.

UH Hilo HOSA’s Public Service Announcement Team, comprised of juniors Travis Taylor and Shayne Cabudol, freshman Kit Neikirk, and senior Jeremy Villanueva, captured 1st Place in Public Service Announcement event with their 30-second PSA on “Stop the Bleed.”

In the individual competition, junior Daniel Kimura received 2nd Place in Medical Terminology and junior Rhodney Hernando advanced as a 2nd Round Finalist in the Physical Therapy event.

Taylor, current UH Hilo chapter president, was elected as the Hawaiʻi HOSA State Postsecondary Vice President.

The UH Hilo HOSA team next participates in the 2020 International Leadership Conference, scheduled for June 24-27, 2020 at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas.

HOSA – Future Health Professionals is an international organization with more than 245,000 members and 2.5 million alumni. HOSA was established in Hawaiʻi in 2005 and has grown to more than 1,700 members.

Live Stream with Bernie Sanders at UH Hilo – Proposed Legislation to Make Tuition Free

Tomorrow, Tuesday October 10th, the University of Hawaii Hilo registered group Global Hope, will be showing a nation-wide streaming of Bernie Sanders proposed legislation to make public colleges and universities tuition free.

The presentation will be at 7:00pm at University of Hawaii Hilo in UCB 100.

Many in Hawaii support Bernie Sanders and will be interested in this proposal.

Class of 2021 to Recite Pharmacist Oath at UH Hilo White Coat Ceremony

Eighty-two student pharmacists will hear words of inspiration from the president of one of Hawaiʻi’s few remaining independent pharmacies at this year’s University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) White Coat Ceremony on October 8 in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center. The event, which takes place from 2-4 p.m., is open to the public.

Kimberly Mikami Svetin, the third president in the 82-year history of family-run Moloka`i Drugs, will be the keynote speaker. Svetin will give the student pharmacists her view of “how to get the most out of life.” She also plans to talk about how the pharmacy staff at Hawaiʻi’s oldest independent pharmacy focuses on the community and how that benefits their personal and professional lives.

The ceremony, where new student pharmacists recite the Oath of a Pharmacist, signifies a rite of passage for individuals entering their first year in the professional program. Students will be cloaked with a white coat symbolizing their student status and the values of the profession.

Three pharmacy residents who are continuing their training with DKICP faculty on Kaua`i and O`ahu, as well as a new Ph.D. student at DKICP, also will take part in the ceremony.

Ka Haka ʻUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language will perform the mele ho`okipa, or welcoming chant, Ua Ao Hawaiʻi.

The students will also be addressed by UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai and DKICP Dean Carolyn Ma.

The event is sponsored exclusively by Walgreens. Erin Samura, Pharmacy Manager from Hilo, will speak on behalf of Walgreens.

THE HAWAII PROMISE – Nearly 1,000 Students Awarded Hawai’i Promise Scholarships

Almost 1,000 students from the University of Hawaiʻi’s seven community colleges have been awarded Hawaiʻi Promise scholarships for the 2017 fall semester. This represents about 4 percent of the 23,000 students currently enrolled at UH Community Colleges.

Windward Community College

The scholarships are designed to remove all cost barriers to attending UH Community Colleges, which have already been recognized among the most affordable two-year public institutions in the nation. An estimated $1.4 million in Hawaiʻi Promise scholarships has been awarded, and the average scholarship per student is $1,416.

Hawaiʻi Promise provides aid for any financial needs not met by other forms of financial aid, such as federal grants and benefits and scholarships from UH or other sources. Its goal is to provide free in-state tuition for qualified UH Community College students and covers tuition, fees, books, supplies and transportation.

The governor and the legislature recognized the importance of this program and the need for those last dollars to make it possible for qualified students to go to college.
—John Morton

UH Vice President John Morton credits Gov. David Ige and the state legislature, which appropriated $1.8 million during the 2017 session for each year of the fiscal biennium 2018 and 2019 through the state budget bill.

“The governor and the legislature recognized the importance of this program and the need for those last dollars to make it possible for qualified students to go to college,” said Morton. “We thank them for their support and their vision.”

“Programs such as Hawaiʻi Promise remove cost barriers for anyone who wants to attend college, clearing the path for community college students to complete their education,” Ige said. “Higher education is the key to higher paying jobs and a better quality of life.”

Morton also noted that the UH Board of Regents first supported and approved the proposal for the Hawaiʻi Promise scholarship program in 2016. It was part of Gov. Ige’s executive package, and both houses introduced Hawaiʻi Promise bills in 2017.

How Hawaiʻi Promise works

There are a number of steps for students to qualify for a Hawaiʻi Promise scholarship. First, a student must apply for federal financial aid, by filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The federal government calculates the Expected Family Contribution, or what the student’s family can afford to pay. Twenty-five per cent of the expected family contribution is applied to direct costs of attending college—tuition, fees, books supplies and local transportation. The balance of the family contribution is applied to room board and personal expenses.

If eligible, a student may then be awarded Pell grant and Supplemental Education Opportunity grant money. A student may also be awarded various UH and UH Foundation scholarships and/or scholarships from other sources.

If all these grants and award reviews are completed and the student still has unmet need for direct costs, such as tuition, fees and books, the student receives a Hawaiʻi Promise scholarship to cover any unmet direct costs.

National recognition

Hawaiʻi Promise has already caught the eye of the College Promise Campaign, a nonpartisan, nonprofit higher-education initiative to build widespread support for funding the first two years of a community college education. The campaign is chaired by Jill Biden and former Wyoming Gov. Jim Geringer.

“The College Promise Campaign is delighted that Hawaiʻi has joined the rapidly growing list of states and communities expanding opportunity for students to complete an undergraduate degree or technical certificate without bearing the burden of unmanageable college debt,” said Martha Kanter, executive director of the College Promise Campaign. “The Hawaiʻi Promise extends educational opportunity to students of any age, including many who never imagined they could afford to go to college.”

Spring semester 2018

UH Community Colleges are encouraging even more students to enroll and apply for the Hawaiʻi Promise scholarships for the spring semester.

“Even though we are already among the most affordable two-year public higher education institutions in the nation, we want to make sure we meet the needs of every Hawaiʻi citizen who has a desire to better their life through higher education,” said Morton.

To apply for a Hawaiʻi Promise scholarship, contact the UH System Financial Office at (808) 956-8753 or uhsfao@hawaii.edu.

UH Hilo Announces 2016-17 Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Awards

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Campus Center Student Leadership Program recently presented Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Recognition awards and certificates to individuals and student organizations for their contributions to UH Hilo and the community during the 2016-17 school year.


The Ka Lama Ku Umeke Awards and a Ka Lama Ku Plaque Award were
presented to:

  • Alaka`i Award–Leadership: Rebekah Loving (Mathematics)
  • `Ike Pāpālua Award-To Have the Gift of Vision: Elise Inouye
    (Communication and Gender and Women’s Studies)
  • Laulima Award – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: Justin Araki-Kwee (Computer Science and Japanese Studies)
  • Ka Lama Ku Koa Plaque Award: Alexandra Huizar (Business Administration)

Two student organizations were recognized with a Ka Lama Ku Leadership
Plaque for their contributions to UH Hilo and Hawai’i Island communities:

  • `Ike Pāpālua Award Plaque- To Have the Gift of Vision: Colleges Against Cancer (Alexandra Huizar, Brittney Luna, Ashley Maldonado, Sarah Kapalihiwa Bilyeu, Kash Laeda, Ali Nakata, Brooke Higa, Kimi Taguchi, Norie Anne Rosal Calit, Jade Wong, Misty Figuera, Jualin Sable Guting, Ruby Ann Sales, Ellie-Jean Kalawe, James Drescher, Sheryl Cariaga, Jayahmie Drio, Shaylyn Fujii, Erin McClure and Stacy Mae Gelacio)
  • Ka Lama Ku Hui Koa Award Plaque- Exemplifies the five values of Ka Lama Ku: Nā Haumāna Huaka`i i Kaho`olawe (Sarah Kapalihiwa Bilyeu, Sophie Kaleimomi Dolera, Joshua No`eau Kalima, Alana Kanahele, Sheena Kau`i Lopes, Aaron Kahea Morton, Isaac Ku`uiponohea Pang, Ulupuamahinamaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld and Kiliona Young)

The Ka Lama Ku Certificate of Leadership was presented to individual students
and organizations in the following categories:

  • Alaka`i Certificate – Leadership: Kalaiakea Blakemore (Art)
  • Kuleana Certificate – We are Accountable and Responsible: Bennjamin P Siemers (Kinesiology Education) and the 2016-17 Psychology and Kinesiology and Exercise Science Peer Advising Team (Alia Alvarez, Cheyrub Cabarloc, Zach Gorski, Keian Shon, Julie Tom, Leahi Akao, Chelsea Mitsuda, Froile Queja, Kaylee Rapoza, Bennjamin Siemers, Roget Chan, Jamie Ouye and Gabriella Sanchez)
  • `Ike Pāpālua Certificate – To Have the Gift of Vision: Lara Hughes (Business Administration)
  • Mālama `Āina Certificate – Taking Care of the Land and Environment: Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science (Erin Busch, Keolohilani H Lopes Jr., Kailey Pascoe, Rose Hart and Jessica Kirkpatrick)
  • Mālama `Ohana Certificate – Taking Care of Our Families: Kanani Daley (Art)

The Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Recognition Awards are sponsored by the UH Hilo Campus Center Fee Board, the Ka Lama Ku Student Advisory Council, the Student Activities Council, University Radio Hilo and Vulcan Video Productions, Ke Kalahea, and the Division of Student Affairs.

Department of Health and University of Hawaii at Hilo Notify Students and Staff of TB Exposure at Hilo Campus

Clinic to be held on campus in April

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) and University of Hawaii at Hilo are notifying approximately 120 students and staff members of their recent possible exposure to a person with active tuberculosis (TB) at the Hilo campus. All students and staff will be receiving a notice describing the situation and whether testing is recommended. A clinic for TB testing will be held on campus this month and DOH will be testing only those persons with regular close contact to the patient.

“The University of Hawaii Hilo campus activities and all classes can be held as scheduled with no safety concerns related to the past possible exposure,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “We don’t expect to find more individuals with infectious TB disease, but we hope to identify individuals who may have had recent exposure, are not contagious, and could benefit from preventative medication.”

“Tuberculosis usually requires many hours of close indoor person-to-person contact to spread it to others,” said Dr. Elizabeth MacNeill, chief of the TB Control Branch. “Most of the students and staff are not at risk, and our investigation to date has found no related active TB cases and no spread of the disease at the university or in the community.”

DOH conducted an extensive investigation and evaluation of potential contacts and possible exposure immediately after being notified of the active TB case. The individual is receiving treatment and is no longer infectious. Further Information on the individual and their case is confidential and protected by law.

TB is a disease that is commonly seen in the lungs and can only be spread from person-to- person through the air. When a person with active TB disease in the lung or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings, tiny drops containing M. tuberculosis may be spread into the air. If another person inhales these drops there is a chance that they will become infected with TB.  Two forms of TB exist, both of which are treatable and curable:

  1. Latent TB infection – when a person has TB bacteria in their body but the body’s immune system is protecting them and they are not sick. Someone with latent TB infection cannot spread the infection to other people.
  2. Active TB disease – when a person becomes sick with TB because their immune system can no longer protect them. It usually takes many months or years from having infection to developing the disease and most people (90 percent) will never become ill. Someone with active TB disease may be able to spread the disease to other people.

For more information on tuberculosis, please call the State of Hawaii Tuberculosis Control Program at 832-5731 or visit the Department of Health website at www.hawaii.gov/health/tb.

UH Hilo to Host Presentation on Multiracial America

The public is invited to attend a presentation on the social and political implications of America’s increasingly multiracial landscape by Dr. Lauren Davenport, assistant professor of political science at Stanford University. Beyond Black and White: The Identity Construction and Political Attitudes of Biracial Americans will be held on Friday, April 7, from 5 –7 p.m. at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Student Services Center Room W-201.

America’s multiple-race population has surged by 106 percent since the 2000 U.S. Census, when Americans were first allowed to self-identify with more than one race. By 2050, an estimated 20 percent of Americans are expected to identify with multiple racial groups. Davenport’s presentation will address several questions, including:

  • How do mixed-race Americans see themselves, socially, culturally and politically?
  • What determines how someone of mixed-race parentage racially self-identifies?
  • What are the repercussions for the broader American political structure?
  • How do people of mixed-race approach various racial and social policies?
  • What is the impact on resources and benefits intended for minority populations?

The event is sponsored by the Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund and organized by the Department of Political Science and the Office of International Student Services and Intercultural Education.

Seating is limited. To reserve a seat, visit http://go.hawaii.edu/jK1. For more information, contact Dr. Su-Mi Lee at sumilee@hawaii.edu. For disability accommodation, contact Disability Services at 932-7623 (V), 932-7002 (TTY), or email uds@hawaii.edu.

Black Arm Band to Perform “Dirtsong” at UH Hilo

A musical presentation celebrating the past and revolutionizing the future of Indigenous Australia will take place when Black Arm Band performs “Dirtsong” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 20, at 7:30 p.m.
Black Arm Band, a collective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), is led by some of Australia’s foremost indigenous artists, including Emma Donovan, Fred Leone, Mark Atkins and Deline Briscoe, alongside Executive Producer Elizabeth Woollacott. Considered one of Australia’s leading performing arts companies, they have been widely acclaimed in Australia and internationally.

At the heart of their work is the group’s relationship with indigenous communities from which they draw inspiration. Their musical tradition and presentation is forged from over 40,000 years of living culture, infused with contemporary styles adopted as their own by Aboriginal Australia.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $30 General, $25 Discount and $15 UH Hilo/Hawai `i CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17 pre-sale, or $35, $30 and $20 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

People’s Congress Tonight at UH Hilo

Leading non-profit and advocacy groups in Hawai‘i launched “The People’s Congress,” a new initiative to build a more just, fair and healthy future for Hawai`i. Working with organizations and individuals across the islands, this coalition seeks to end systemic barriers to justice with the launch of a “People’s Agenda” – a political and organizing strategy for lasting positive change in Hawaiʻi.

peoples-congressThe main launch event of The People’s Congress is a two-day statewide convention on December 2-4, 2016 in Honolulu, hosted by organizations and community leaders working across the islands on issues of social, economic, racial and environmental justice. Also, from October 19th – 27th, community forums will be held on each island to convene local leaders and gather input for the People’s Agenda.

Today, Thursday Oct. 27th, from 6pm-9pm in UCB 100 at UHH 200 W. Kawili St. Free parking on campus after 4pm. This event is free and will include some light pupus from local restaurants and farmers, feel free to bring something to share.

There will be food/refreshments at the event and free HAPA T-shirts for the first 15 people to sign-in.

The People’s Congress will provide an opportunity to engage in shared movement building and concrete action. More information is available at: https://www.facebook.com/PeoplesCongressHI. (Upcoming website address: www.PeoplesCongressHI.org)

People’s Congress Partner Organizations include Aikea Movement, Community Alliance on Prisons, Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action (HAPA), Hawaiʻi Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice, Hawaiʻi Center for Food Safety (HCFS), Hawai‘i People’s Fund, Hawai‘i SEED, Hawai‘i Teachers for Change Caucus, Hawai‘i’s Thousand Friends, Life of the Land, Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation (NHLC), Sierra Club of Hawai`i, the Aloha ‘Aina Project, and Unite Here! Local 5 Union and Global HOPE.

Why Now? Hawai‘i residents are facing fundamental challenges: historic wealth inequality and a high cost of living, lack of affordable housing, an education system in crisis, and the 6th highest rate of poverty in the United States. And Hawai‘i’s lands and waters are at increasing risk: local funding for environmental protection is dropping as the climate crisis worsens; streams are diverted even as we face drought. Because Hawai`i imports 80% of our food and much of our energy, we are vulnerable to high food and energy prices, shortages in basic necessities, and unstable job markets. Hawaiʻi’s residents need fundamental change. That is why The People’s Congress will convene concerned citizens throughout the islands to focus on positive solutions to these long-standing problems.

“Hawai‘i Appleseed is excited to be a part of the People’s Congress because of its potential to bring together a strong, unified voice to address the most pressing issues facing Hawai‘i,” said Gavin Thornton, Co-Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice. “So many of our residents struggle with high housing costs, low wages, inequitable tax burdens, and other widespread problems that threaten their ability to achieve economic stability and fulfill their potential.

The People’s Congress can help create a shared vision of a better Hawai‘i and raise the chorus for positive change.” Cade Watanabe, of Unite Here! Local 5 and Aikea Movement said, “We live in a Hawai`i that today provides less and less opportunity for Hawai‘i’s working families. The People’s Congress is an exciting opportunity for our members to connect, strategize and organize for a better Hawai‘i. It’s time for us to take back our community.” Tiare Lawrence, Project Coordinator for HAPA, and also a founder and community organizer for the Aloha `Āina Project, believes that the People’s Congress “will allow us the opportunity to build partnerships and help us help each other. I believe these partnerships will assist us in achieving our goals for a better Hawai‘i.”

Moses K.N. Haia, Executive Director for the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation (NHLC) said, “The People’s Congress represents cooperative and collaborative work which seeks proactive change for the benefit of the entire community. For NHLC, this initiative provides a partnership opportunity that will greatly assist with identifying the issues important to members of the larger community as a means of engaging in a collective effort to align those interests with the best interests of the Hawaiian community.”

The head of the Hawai`i “Teachers for Change” Caucus, Mireille Ellsworth, makes clear “we want to establish connections with activists on other issues that also affect our students, members and the larger community. Without developing shared understanding of the need for crosscutting solidarity in action, we will always be easily isolated and defeated.”

Marti Townsend, Director of Sierra Club of Hawai‘i said, “People’s Congress provides a unique opportunity for us to work together with others of like-mind and mission. The Sierra Club’s mission is to protect both the natural and human environment. To achieve this mission we need a fair and open government committed to serving the interests of the people, not corporations. We need a system that respects and includes all of us equally. We need a community united in our collective best interest to overcome the oppression and fear that dictates so much of our decisionmaking today.”

“There are so many good people working on important issues, from protecting our natural resources for future generations, to issues of homelessness, wealth inequality, open government, education and equal rights,” said Anne Frederick, Executive Director of HAPA. “We believe that if we come together through the People’s Congress to identify the barriers we face in common and illuminate the root causes of injustice we all face, that we (and our work) can be more powerful and effective.”

United Nations Official to Address Global Refugee Crisis at UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo observes United Nations Day with a public lecture by Robert Skinner, director of the United Nations Information Centre in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, October 25 at 2 p.m. in UCB Room 100. Skinner’s talk, entitled “Global Refugee Crisis: Finding a Way Forward,” will focus on the current crisis and discuss UN efforts to mitigate such crises.

Robert Skinner

Robert Skinner

Skinner was appointed to his current position by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on November 9, 2015. He previously held leadership positions in the United Nations Foundation New York Office as executive director and the United States Department of State as deputy spokesperson at the United States Mission to the United Nations in New York. He was also a public affairs officer for the United States Embassy in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

The talk is sponsored by the UNA-USA Hawaiʻi Chapter, the UH Hilo Political Science Department, and the UH Hilo International Student Services & Intercultural Education program.

For more information, contact Dr. Su-Mi Lee at 932-7127 or email sumilee@hawaii.edu.

Free ‘Imiloa Membership for All UH Hilo Students

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has announced an exciting new benefit for its students. For the very first time, the University’s ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is offering a complimentary individual membership to every student with a valid I.D. who is registered for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Free Imiloa
“Very few universities can boast an on-campus resource like the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, which showcases Mauna Kea and its cultural and scientific value, especially way-finding and astronomy,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “We greatly appreciate this gesture and encourage all of our students to take advantage of the benefits ‘Imiloa has to offer throughout the academic year.”

‘Imiloa is located on the upper campus, and housed in a striking titanium-clad conical structure. The Center is open to the public six days a week (Tuesday-Sunday). Student members will be able to enjoy four free daily shows in the full-dome planetarium, full access to the interactive exhibit hall, plus discounts on special events and purchases at ‘Imiloa’s award-winning Sky Garden Restaurant and on-site store.

For Astronomy majors Shelby Wood and Micah English, an ‘Imiloa membership is something they’ll make extensive use of.

“I’m from New Mexico, and have never been to ‘Imiloa, so I appreciate the opportunity to check it out,” Wood said. “I think it’s really great that they are doing this, because I have been to the planetarium and it was really cool,” English added.

Hawaiian Studies Major Kehaulani Esteban sees ‘Imiloa as a valuable resource for learning more about the Hawaiian culture.

“I’m really looking forward to the Mauna Kea show because we get to learn about how the Hawaiian Islands were created,” Esteban said.

`Imiloa Executive Director Ka’iu Kimura sees the memberships as an effective avenue for advancing ‘Imiloa’s mission to inspire exploration through the sharing of Hawaiian culture and science.

“One of the goals ‘Imiloa has set for our second decade is to take our programming across the island, the state and beyond. At the same time, however, we are committed to amplifying our impact here at home,” Kimura said. “What better way to inspire the next generation than to deepen our ties to UH Hilo and the community of students at our doorstep?”

Students can activate their free membership by visiting: http://blog.imiloahawaii.org/general-information/free-imiloa-membership-for-all-uh-hilo-students/.

Governor Ige Community Connection Meeting Tomorrow in Hilo

Governor  David Ige will be having a Community Connection meeting tomorrow.  He will talk briefly about his Administration’s strategic initiatives and more importantly, to listen and engage in conversations about top-of-mind issues for the people of East Hawai’i.

Statewide engagement and collaboration with our Island communities are essential for creating positive and lasting changes within our State.  Representatives will also be present from the following departments:  Department of Land and Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, Department of Transportation and Governor’s Leadership on Homelessness:

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at University Classroom Building (UCB) 301, Room 100

As you enter the main entrance off of West Kawili Street, the flag poles will be straight ahead and the building will be on the left side.  The building name is UCB 301 and Room 100 is on the first floor.

As you enter the main entrance off of West Kawili Street, the flag poles will be straight ahead and the building will be on the left side. The building name is UCB 301 and Room 100 is on the first floor.

After the General Session, breakout sessions will provide you with an opportunity to focus on your area of interest.  The room assignments are as follows:

  • Department of Land and Natural Resources:  UCB 301, Room 100
  • Department of Agriculture/Department of Health:  Campus Center Building, Room 301
  • Department of Transportation:  UCB 301, Room 127
  • Governor’s Leadership on Homelessness:  Campus Center Building, Room 306

If you have time in your schedule, we hope you can attend the Governor’s Community Connection meeting.

For additional information, please contact the Governor’s East Hawai`i office at 974-6262.

 

UH Hilo’s Lam Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award

Carolina Lam, director of global education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Center for Global Education and Exchange, has received a prestigious Fulbright International Education Administrators (IEA) Award to visit South Korea.

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

The purpose of the program is to provide international education administrators an opportunity to learn about the host country’s educational system and network with Korean and U.S. cohort colleagues. Lam will spend two weeks in June traveling throughout South Korea, meeting with representatives from the country’s universities, along with selected government and private sector agencies.

“I am honored to have been selected to participate in this program,” Lam said. “I look forward to learning more about South Korea’s culture and educational system, and visiting with at least four of our 11 partner universities that are located there.”

The IEA award is part of the Fulbright Scholar program, which sends approximately 1,100 U.S. faculty and professionals abroad each year. Fulbright programs are international education exchanges that are sponsored by the U.S. government and designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

For more information, visit http://www.cies.org.

UH Hilo Announces 2015-16 Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Awards

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Campus Center Leadership Program recently presented Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Recognition awards and certificates to individuals and student organizations for their contributions to UH Hilo and the community during the 2015-2016 school year.
UHHilo

The Ka Lama Ku Umeke Awards and a Ka Lama Ku Award Plaque were presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate of Leadership: Destiny Rodriguez
• ˋIke Pāpālua Certificate of Leadership To Have the Gift of Vision: Mya Yee Nandar
• Laulima Award – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: Rose Hart
• Mālama Award – Taking Care of Others & Community: Serena Massrey
• Mālama ˋOhana Award – Taking Care of Our Families: Lauryn P. Mow
• Ka Lama Ku Recognition Plaque: Matthew Groulx

The Ka Lama Ku Leadership Plaque recognized student organizations for contributions to UH Hilo and Hawai’i Island communities:

• Alakai Award Plaque: The Pacific Youth Empowerment Day Team (Theresa Kimnoy Aten, Sinforsa Suzie Lippwe, Sione Lam Yuen Jr., Felicia Andrew, Axel Defngin, Bill Kennedy Yang, Lashay Masami, Jacob Kom, Elaine Chugen and Cheryll Ligohr

• ˋIke Pāpālua Award Plaque – To Have the Gift of Vision.: The Pacific Students Media Team (Calvin Myazoe ( Marshallese), Erbiland Mandira (Marshallese) Kathleen Gikbay (Yapese), Axel Defngin (Yapese), Bill Kennedy Yang (Kosraen/Pohnpeian), Vester Robester (Yapese/Pohnpeian) and Peter P Ramofolo (Solomon Islander)

• Kuleana Award Plaque – We are Accountable & Responsible: The Psychology and Kinesiology & Exercise Science Peer Advising Team (Alia Alvarez, Salamasina Aumua, Henry Blake, Bree Kalima, Keirsa Pakani-Tsukiyama, Nicole Rascon, Bailey Rodriguez, Keian Shon, Bennjamin Siemers and Ashley Winslow)

• Mālama Award Plaque – Taking Care of Others and Community: The Kanilehua Living Learning Community Peer Mentors/Tutors ( Bronson Palupe, Austin Awana, Abcde Zoller and Ashlen Kinilau)

The Certificate of Leadership was presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate – Leadership: Kailey Lapenia
• Kuleana Certificate – We are Accountable & Responsible: Bree Kalima
• Laulima Certificate – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: The UH Hilo Graduate Student Council (Heather Kimball, Deborah Michiko Fried, Samuel Kamu Plunkett and Summer Danner)
• Mālama ‘Āina Certificate – Taking Care of the Land and Environment: Kiana Soloria
• Mālama ‘Ohana Certificate – Taking Care of our Families: Koa Rodrigues

The Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Program is sponsored by the UH Hilo Campus Center Fee Board, the Student Advisory Council, and Student Activities Council.

2016 UH Hilo Awards and Recognition Celebration Awardees

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo honored several members of the University community at its 2016 Awards and Recognition Celebration held on Thursday, May 5.
UH Hilo Moniker
Mathematics Professor Dr. Mitch Anderson was presented with the Excellence in Service Award, given to a faculty or professional staff for service-related professional skills to UH Hilo and the community.

Anderson is one of the most active professors in the UH Hilo Faculty Congress and the go-to faculty member for program review, assessment and accreditation, one nominator noted. He was a key author of the new Program Review Handbook that went into effect two years ago, and also spearheaded one of the nation’s biggest mathematical curricular redesigns by working with the State Department of Education to align its mathematics curriculum to state Common Core Standards (CCSS). His efforts have helped make Hawai’i a model for curricular alignment to CCSS.

Kaliko Trapp, lecturer, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, received the Distinguished Service Award for Improving Student Life for making outstanding contributions beyond the boundaries of his official responsibilities.

His student nominator, Vanessa Winchester-Sai, who is largely confined to a wheelchair, credits Trapp with helping her get the most out of her educational experience. In addition to being an instructor, he provided the technical accommodations necessary for Winchester-Sai to participate in her other classes as well. She said Trapp has made a profound difference in her life, for which she is eternally grateful.

The Pūlama ʻIke Award, which recognizes a significant contribution to developing and promoting the spirit and mission of the University, was presented to Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim vice chancellor for student affairs.

As a member of UH President David Lassner’s Hawai’i Papa O Ke Ao task force to indigenize each campus, she has spearheaded activities to increase student success, faculty and staff development, and institutional and extramural funding. Makuakāne-Lundin has led the Kupa ʻĀina Summer Bridge program with Kamehameha Schools, which provides incoming students with a six-week residential experience focused on cultivating academic learning, personal development and professional skill sets. Her U.S. Department of Education grant-funded Ho’okahua initiative provided $1 million in improvements and renovations to the Hale Kanilehua dormitory while funding a Scholars-in-Residence program that included Dr. Manulani Meyer and Keali’i Reichel among its participants.

Dr. Mahavir Chougule, associate professor, department of pharmaceutical sciences, was awarded the Koichi and Taniyo Taniguchi Award for Excellence and Innovation, which recognizes creativity in teaching, scholarship and artistic production at UH Hilo.

Chougule has contributed to UH Hilo’s training and research mission with innovative nanotechnology research, focusing on targeted delivery to improve the therapeutic outcomes of diseases such as cancer and asthma that resulted in filing a provisional application for a patent. His research has led to establishment of the first nanotechnology-based extramural funded lung cancer and asthma program in the State of Hawaiʻi, bringing national recognition to the University in the form of the American Association of Cancer Research Minority-Serving Institution Faculty Scholar in Cancer Research Award.

The Excellence in Building & Grounds Maintenance Award was presented to Kevin Hand, the University’s electrician.

Hand is currently UH Hilo’s only electrician, who is currently working on a campus-wide lighting conversion. The replacement of old fluorescent light fixtures with modern LED fixtures is enabling the University to maintain existing light levels with half as many lights, while saving an estimated 60 percent on electricity for lighting. He has also helped beautify the grounds and buildings by installing new conduits inside and underneath buildings.

Jamie Ouye, Housing’s senior resident student assistant, was named Student Employee of the Year.

Selected for a strong work ethic and attention to detail, Ouye plans and implements engaging training and staff outreach, and has coordinated various informational outreach and awareness programs, such as suicidal ideation, the effects of bullying, stress management, and the importance of community service. Ouye was also credited for going the extra mile for her co-workers by covering shifts during breaks and holidays to allow them to travel home to visit family.

The event also recognized retired employees and those receiving various years of service awards.