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Volunteers Sought to Restore Hawaiian Rainforest

Help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest at the summit of Kīlauea volcano and volunteer for “Stewardship at the Summit” programs in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, January through March 2017.

Stewardship at the Summit begins at 9 a.m. and ends at noon. The dates January through March are: January 6, 14, 21 and 27; February 3, 11, 18 and 20 (Presidents Day and fee-free); and March 3, 10, 18, 25 and 31.

A volunteer frees a native pa‘iniu (Astelia menziesiana), a member of the lily family, from a patch of invasive ginger.
NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Volunteers help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.

Volunteers have dedicated more than 7,500 hours of their time, and have restored more than 61 acres of native rainforest within the national park since 2012. Countless Himalayan ginger, faya, Australian tree fern, strawberry guava, and other invasive, non-native plants that threaten the native understory near the summit of Kīlauea volcano have been removed. In their place, once-shaded ‘ōhi‘a trees, ‘ama‘u and hāpu‘u tree ferns have re-emerged, and pa‘iniu, kāwa‘u, and other important native plants are returning to the stewardship plots.

“Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has entered its 100th year of stewarding this fragile ecosystem, and we need everyone’s help in making sure the Hawaiian rainforest remains intact beyond the next 100 years,” said volunteer and project leader, Paul Field. “We invite the community and visitors to join us. In addition to giving back to the land, you’ll learn to identify native and invasive plants, how to safely control invasive species, and how to avoid spreading other pest species, including Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death,” he said.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park provides numerous ways for visitors to connect with and appreciate Hawaiian culture, active volcanoes, and native plants and animals. It is a designated World Heritage Site (1987) and International Biosphere Reserve (1980).

Volunteers Sought for Stewardship at the Summit

Help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest at the summit of Kīlauea volcano for the next 100 years and volunteer for “Stewardship at the Summit” programs in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, now through September 2016.

"Many hands." Park volunteers and staff work to remove invasive plant species near Devastation Trail.   NPS Photo

“Many hands.” Park volunteers and staff work to remove invasive plant species near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo

Stewardship at the Summit begins at 9 a.m. and ends at noon. The dates July through September are: July 9, 13, 23, and 29; August 5, 13, and 19; and September 2, 10, 14, 24 (National Public Lands Day) and 30.

Volunteers help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 9 a.m. on any of the above dates. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply.

Park entrance will be free on National Public Lands Day, Sept. 24, 2016, and volunteers on this day will receive a pass to return and enjoy the park fee-free on another day of their choosing.

“Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park enters its second century this year, and we encourage everyone to lend a hand to protect the park’s native ecosystems to ensure their survival, and for future generations to enjoy,” said project leader and volunteer Paul Field. “It’s fun and fairly easy work. We have volunteers who range in age from eight to over 80 helping out,” he said.

Volunteers have dedicated more than 5,000 hours of their time, and have restored more than 35 acres of native rainforest within the national park since 2012. Countless Himalayan ginger, faya, strawberry guava, and other invasive, non-native plants that threaten the native understory near the summit of Kīlauea volcano have been removed. In their place, once-shaded ‘ama‘u and hāpu‘u tree ferns have re-emerged, and pa‘iniu, kāwa‘u, and other important native plants are returning to the stewardship plots.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th birthday in 2016. The park provides numerous ways for visitors to connect with and appreciate Hawaiian culture, active volcanoes, and native plants and animals. It is a designated World Heritage Site (1987) and International Biosphere Reserve (1980).

Volunteers Sought for Stewardship at the Summit

Resolve to protect Hawai‘i’s fragile ecosystem from invasive, non-native species by volunteering for “Stewardship at the Summit” programs throughout 2014.

Park volunteer and Stewardship at the Summit project leader Paul Field shows an endemic kōlea plant freed from a thicket of invasive ginger. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Park volunteer and Stewardship at the Summit project leader Paul Field shows an endemic kōlea plant freed from a thicket of invasive ginger. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Stewardship at the Summit begins at 9 a.m. and ends at noon. The dates from January through March are: Jan. 3, 10, 20, 18, and 24; Feb. 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28; and March 7, 14, 22, and 26.

Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 9 a.m. on any of the above dates. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, garden gloves, day pack, snacks and water. Tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply.

There is no entrance fee on Mon., Jan. 20. The park honors Martin Luther King Day by participating in the National Day of Service with a special Stewardship at the Summit program,
9 a.m. to noon.

Park volunteers have restored more than five acres of native Hawaiian rainforest since re-invigorating the program last year, said volunteer Paul Field. Countless Himalayan ginger, faya, strawberry guava, and other invasive, non-native plants that threaten the native understory near the summit of Kīlauea volcano have been removed. In their place, once-shaded ‘ama‘u and hāpu‘u tree ferns have re-emerged, and pa‘iniu, kāwa‘u, and other vital, native plants are starting to return to these stewardship plots.

“There is no way we could be making these gains against the invasives without our community,” said Kūpono McDaniel, volunteer coordinator at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. “It is so fun to see everyone out there having a good time meeting new friends and making a very noticeable difference on the ground.  These amazing philanthropists understand that time spent serving their public lands is a service to all,” McDaniel said.