• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    November 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    252627282930  

Flash Flood Watch Issued For All Hawaiian Islands – Bring On Flossie!

Civildefense

FLASH FLOOD WATCH FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT…

.HEAVY RAIN ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FLOSSIE WILL BRING THE THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING ACROSS THE MAIN HAWAIIAN ISLANDS STARTING WEDNESDAY MORNING AND THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT.

..FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT…

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN HONOLULU HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR ALL HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

* FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT.

* HEAVY RAIN ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL CYCLONE FLOSSIE WILL BRING THE THREAT OF WIDESPREAD HEAVY RAIN THAT COULD RESULT IN FLASH FLOODING.

* THE RAIN WILL BE WIDESPREAD…WILL AFFECT BOTH THE UPPER AND LOWER ELEVATIONS. THE HEAVY RAIN WILL ALSO FALL OVER URBAN AREAS IN THE LOWER ELEVATIONS…WHICH WILL BE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO FLOODING PROBLEMS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS VERY DANGEROUS. REMEMBER THAT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE RAINING HEAVILY WHERE YOU ARE FOR FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR.

MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION IF FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ARE ISSUED.

Instructions:

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS VERY DANGEROUS. REMEMBER THAT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE RAINING HEAVILY WHERE YOU ARE FOR FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR. MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION IF FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ARE ISSUED.

 

Wordless Wednesday – Is Pele Awakening? Volcano Area Shaking for the Last 24 Hours

MAP 1.8 2012/02/23 01:58:37 19.419 -155.324 4.1 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.4 2012/02/23 01:39:27 19.417 -155.328 3.3 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.2 2012/02/22 19:08:07 19.422 -155.321 5.0 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.3 2012/02/22 18:07:46 19.137 -155.562 35.9 8 km ( 5 mi) NNE of Naalehu, HI
MAP 1.9 2012/02/22 17:16:28 19.426 -155.327 3.4 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.9 2012/02/22 17:00:57 19.421 -155.326 3.7 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.6 2012/02/22 16:59:01 19.419 -155.323 4.1 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 3.2 2012/02/22 16:55:34 19.430 -155.319 4.0 9 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.5 2012/02/22 16:35:48 19.422 -155.323 4.4 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.1 2012/02/22 15:53:09 19.424 -155.327 3.2 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.0 2012/02/22 15:33:36 19.424 -155.323 3.5 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.1 2012/02/22 15:17:18 19.431 -155.326 3.1 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.0 2012/02/22 15:14:09 19.428 -155.324 3.1 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.7 2012/02/22 14:29:50 19.415 -155.323 4.5 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 3.0 2012/02/22 13:57:33 19.425 -155.321 4.3 9 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.9 2012/02/22 13:42:13 19.408 -155.495 11.5 23 km ( 14 mi) N of Pahala, HI
MAP 1.8 2012/02/22 13:35:06 19.422 -155.326 3.6 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.6 2012/02/22 13:32:04 19.428 -155.324 0.0 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.1 2012/02/22 13:16:51 19.426 -155.323 3.6 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.7 2012/02/22 12:44:53 19.427 -155.329 2.8 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.7 2012/02/22 12:43:24 19.399 -155.274 1.0 7 km ( 4 mi) SW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.9 2012/02/22 12:31:39 19.428 -155.325 3.5 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.9 2012/02/22 12:23:37 19.426 -155.329 2.8 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.2 2012/02/22 11:56:43 19.422 -155.324 3.7 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 1.8 2012/02/22 11:29:53 19.426 -155.325 3.4 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI
MAP 2.2 2012/02/22 11:19:41 19.424 -155.324 3.4 10 km ( 6 mi) WSW of Volcano, HI

FREE Upcoming Community Emergency Response Training

Hawaii County Civil Defense Release:

Hawai`i County is ranked number one in the nation for potential hazards ~  earthquake, tsunami, flood, fire, hurricane, etc. The question isn’t if a disaster will strike, but when will a disaster strike … and will you be prepared? Will you be ready to care for yourself and your family?

Re-enactment during the 2009 Waimea Community Emergency Response Training

Maybe you’ve already assembled an emergency kit. Now learn the skills you need to help yourself, your family, and your neighbors respond to an emergency by attending the Community Emergency Response Team Training course (CERT). The 4-day CERT course is free and will be held on April 9, 16, 23, 30 at Waikoloa Elementary School from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.

Residents, businesses, and community groups are eligible to participate in this course presented by the Hawai`i County Civil Defense and Fire Department. To register, or for more information please contact Bill Hanson of the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031. http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/about.shtm

Councilman Hoffman on Tsunami Sirens and Effective Leadership

Commentary by Councilman Pete Hoffman:

There are times when one wonders whether anyone listens.  Part of the problem may be a lack of communication, or perhaps a lack of understanding of perhaps a lack of leadership.  You decide which of these applies in the recent tsunami siren debacle.

In December 2009, my office initiated discussions with County Civil Defense to address obvious shortfalls in tsunami siren coverage in our resort areas in West Hawaii, brought to my attention by a Puna resident.  A little research also noted that our County code had no requirements for such an early warning system.  The first “tsunami drill” of 26 Feb 2010 highlighted these deficiencies in an actual evacuation, and shortly thereafter, my office prepared a draft amendment to our code to address this issue.

The proposed legislation was referred to both the Planning Commissions, where last November and December, it was met with less than an enthusiastic reception.  The Planning Director criticized the draft proposal on several counts:  this effort shouldn’t be part of the plan approval process, State and County Civil Defense should administer the program, and maybe we shouldn’t inconvenience a developer with the associated costs of installing such a system. Both Planning Commissions gave my proposal a negative recommendation and sent it back to Council for further action.

Now I’ve been a Council member long enough to appreciate that there are many possibilities to address issues of this nature.  I have no difficulty if the Planning Director and the Commissions didn’t agree with my suggestions for resolving the issue, but someone please offer alternatives.  However, none were provided.  When the draft returned to the Council’s Planning Committee in January, I urged the administration to work on some viable options.  Several coastal communities were without an obvious public safety mechanism, our County code included no such requirements, and we already had one tsunami evacuation to prove that my concern was not science fiction.  My pleas fell on deaf ears.  I received ‘thunderous silence’ from the administration.  The only response noted was to suggest that the State should pay for the sirens, and that my proposal did not work with the Planning Department’s plan review process.

Personally, I really didn’t care who pays for the installation of the sirens.  The real questions remained: when will the sirens be installed and when will a requirement be established?  Surely I couldn’t be the only one who saw this issue.  Where was the administration’s initiative?  Where was effective leadership demonstrated?  And please, let’s stop the bureaucratic double-talk and concentrate on the shortfall.

In mid-February, after continuing to plead for the administration’s assistance in crafting a bill that would meet its criticisms, the Council’s Planning Committee, frustrated with the administration’s lack of action, approved my proposal sending it to full Council by a vote of 6-3.   Finally, we heard voices from the administration that the Council’s concerns would now be considered.

On 1 March, State Civil Defense went out on bid to install a number of new civil defense sirens on the Big Island not merely in tsunami evacuation zones.  These would include sirens in areas along the coast where none previously existed: among others, two at Mauna Lani, two in the Waikoloa resort area and one at Kona Village.   On 2 March, we were told that an alternative proposal would be drafted to address the deficiency in our code regarding siren requirements.  This flurry of activity did precede the second ‘tsunami drill’ on March 11, and generated a renewed urgency regarding this topic.  The new administration proposal has already been placed on both Planning Commission agendas in April and May, and it can be anticipated that the long-sought alternative will be brought to Council sometime in early June.

The route taken in the effort has been torturous. Would that all tsunamis react with the same ‘glacial speed’ as this legislative process, but at least it is moving forward.  We pride ourselves, with good reason, on the effectiveness of the County’s response to both of the tsunami evacuations and how all assisted.  However, the fact remains that we had thirteen hours and five and a half hours warning respectively.  Would we have been so fortunate if we only had one or two hours notice??  While this issue is finally being addressed and sirens will eventually be installed, after some 15 months of discussion the situation today is: there are significant shortfalls in siren coverage in our resort areas, and no requirement has yet been established for new developments in our code.  Let’s hope for better leadership and let’s pray we don’t have a “third tsunami drill” in which our reaction time would be dramatically reduced as it was in Japan.

Hulihee Palace – Tsunami Update

Upcoming outdoor events are on at Hulihe’e Palace, landmark remains closed

Media Release:

Hulihe‘e Palace remains closed pending a structural assessment of the landmark this week. Two upcoming outdoor events on the palace grounds are still happening as scheduled.

First, this Sunday’s 4 p.m. band concert is confirmed. Also, the annual palace fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, is on for 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., March 26.

Kuakini Building lanai

“We want to thank the community for helping us during the massive cleanup,” says Au Hoy. “We lost numerous items stored in the basement and would greatly appreciate monetary donations to help fund replacement costs.”

Palace caretakers, the volunteer Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins, have been working non-stop since Friday to dry out the basement and any salvageable contents. Treasured artifacts, which were hastily removed from the palace’s first and second floors prior to the tsunami, are being re-installed into the museum’s extensive collection. Partial electricity has been restored.

Pumping water out of palace basement

The main floors of Hulihe‘e Palace were spared the wrath of Friday’s tsunami, which inundated Ali‘i Drive in historic Kailua Village. While the basement of the palace was flooded, there was no water damage to the first floor of the seaside historic landmark.

The palace’s newly renovated caretaker cottage didn’t fare so well. It is off its foundation and the adjacent Ki‘ope Pond, which was used in ancient times by Hawaiian royalty for aquaculture, suffered damage to its walls.

Damaged wall at Ki‘ope pond next to caretaker's cottage; the cottage got knocked off its foundation

“It looks like water came into the pond, surged, and then washed under the cottage,” details Fanny Au Hoy, long-time palace administrator.

The next-door Kuakini Building, which houses the palace’s kitchen and gift shop, suffered interior water damage. The palace’s gift shop, which needs a new floor, will remain closed until further notice.

Gift shop

The top of the seawall along the oceanside lawn of the palace was also damaged, as well as large swaths of sod.

Palace grounds damage

Donations are greatly appreciated and can be mailed to Hulihe‘e Palace, 75-5718 Ali‘i Drive, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740. For information, phone 329-1877.

Hulihe‘e Palace reopened in September 2009 after receiving a $1.5 million renovation to repair damage suffered in the October 2006 earthquake.

HULIHE’E PALACE CARETAKERS—Founded in 1903, the Daughters of Hawai‘i opens its membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in their efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all, 329-1877, www.daughtersofhawaii.org.

Hawaii County Crews Reopen Roads, Assess Damage to Homes, Businesses and Public Facilities in the Wake of the Tsunami

From the Mayors Office:

County of Hawai‘i Public Works crews worked quickly today to clear and reopen Kona roads to allow for detailed assessments of damage, and to clear the way for the public to return to most areas that were closed early this morning as a damaging tsunami approached the Hawaiian Islands.

Hawai‘i County Civil Defense Administrator Quince Mento predicted the damage from the tsunami to homes, businesses, roads and other infrastructure in the County of Hawai‘i will total millions of dollars.

Mayor Billy Kenoi thanked residents for their cooperation and calm as the tsunami approached, noting that the evacuation and preparations for the arrival of the tsunami were executed quickly and safely.

The tsunami resulted in no deaths in the County of Hawai‘i, although there was one injury. A County Department of Public Works Highways Division employee was found unconscious early Friday morning with a head injury, and was taken to Kona Community Hospital for observation.

“I am proud of the way our community pulled together to answer this threat, and I am proud of the efficient, rapid response to this event by our state, federal and county employees, “ Mayor Kenoi said. “Our community knew what to do, and our residents did what was necessary without hesitation, and without complaint.

“I am very concerned about the preliminary damage reports that are coming in, but we all recognize that this could have been much worse. We were very lucky,” Mayor Kenoi said.