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Palace Event to Remember King Kamehameha

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 8 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Inside Hulihee Palace

Inside Hulihe’e Palace

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu; he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Palace Event Remembers the King

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, May 19 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late King Kamehameha IV. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i.

Daughters of Hawaii

Daughters of Hawaii

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho) was 21 when he inherited the throne in 1855. He agonized over the dwindling native population that was reduced from 300,000 in 1778 to 70,000 in 1855. “Hawaiians had no resistance to the diseases of foreigners and over 6,000 caught smallpox brought to the islands in 1853,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The king and his Queen Emma pushed for the building of a hospital so Hawaiians could get adequate medical care.”

Brought up by a physician, Emma shared her husband’s values on health. Liholiho married Emma Naea Rooke in 1856. She was the granddaughter of John Young, Kamehameha’s British advisor. As was the custom for children in Hawai‘i to be given to relatives for upbringing, Emma was the hanai (adopted) daughter of Dr. T. C. Rooke, an English physician practicing in Honolulu, and Emma’s aunt.

“Besides providing funds, the royal couple earnestly solicited donations from others,” explains Ballao. “In 1860, Kamehameha IV laid the cornerstone for the Queen’s Hospital, which he named to honor his wife.” Today, it is the prestigious Queen’s Medical Center in downtown Honolulu.

The king died when he was 29, a short time after his four-year-old Prince Albert became fatally ill. “Queen Emma became a candidate to the throne but lost a heavily contested election to Prince David Kalakaua,” says Ballao “Queen Emma died at the age of 49.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

May 19: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”

Jun 9: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”

Jul 21: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini

Aug 18: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”

Sep 15: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani

Oct 20: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani

Nov 17: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud” Dant

Dec 15: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

New Herb Kane Artwork Collection at King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel

The Kamakahonu National Historic Landmark is n...

Image via Wikipedia

Media Release:

King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel has yet another reason to be proud. Earlier this year, new life was infused into the hotel with the completion of a $35 million dollar renovation. Now, highly acclaimed Hawaiian Historian/Artist Herb Kawainui Kane brings Hawaiian history to life at the hotel via 40 signed and numbered limited-edition giclees, the largest single hotel collection of his work. The artwork is a sequence that depicts early Hawaiian lifestyles and legends, through modern day. Portraits of ali’i (royalty), gods and goddesses, voyages, entertainers and more share stories of Hawai’i’s vibrantly rich past, and present.

The giclees of paintings are prominently displayed throughout the lobby breezeway, between the main lobby and the west tower. The new collection joins an original by Kane that was restored during the renovation – an oil depicting Kamehameha I, his family, and advisors at Kamakahonu, the bay that fronts the hotel. A few other original pieces that have been a part of the lobby display for decades include a treasured feather cape or ahu’ula, feathered helmet or mahi’ole, feather lei, war weapons, and lei niho palaoa (lei of braided human hair and a whale or walrus tooth, usually worn only by royalty).

“We are so excited and honored to be able to showcase some of Herb Kane’s most brilliant pieces,” said Jak Hu, general manager of the hotel. “Walking through the display is like taking a journey back in time, one in which Herb Kane has been able to capture on canvas.”

Kane said it’s fitting that the collection dwells in Kona, in particular, the same area where Hawai’i’s most illustrious ruler, King Kamehameha the Great, last resided.

“Kamakahonu, the site of the King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel, is historically signficant. I couldn’t think of a better place to house this collection,” said Kane. “If my art can contribute to the comprehension and understanding of Hawai’i’s past, I have succeeded.”

Herb Kawainui Kane
Born in 1928, Kane was raised in Waipi’o Valley and Hilo, Hawai’i Island and in Wisconsin. Mr. Kane studied at the University of Chicago and at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he obtained a Masters Degree in 1953, and an honorary doctorate in 2008. A multi-faceted artist, Kane’s career includes advertising art, publishing art, architectural design, painting, writing, and sculpture. He has published several books, and is one of the founders of Polynesian Voyaging Society. He currently resides in rural South Kona. For more information, please visit www.herbkanestudio.com.

King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel sits adjacent to the National Historic Landmark Ahu’ena Heiau, Kamehameha I’s personal and final residence, and the center of political power in the Hawaiian Kingdom. Kamehameha used this site as a gathering place for his kāhuna (priests) and advisors to counsel and guide both he and his successor, Kamehameha II (Liholiho). For reservations or more information, visit www.konabeachhotel.com, or find us on Facebook®.

Mazie Hirono on King Kamehameha

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