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Hulihe’e Palace Remembers Kamehameha Schools Founder

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11 to remember the late Princess Bernice Pauahi. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

huliheePrincess Bernice Pauahi is most well known as the benefactress of Kamehameha Schools. A great-granddaughter of Kamehameha I, she came of age during the Victorian Era. She was well liked and very private. When her cousin, Kamehameha V, chose her as his successor in 1872, she declined. Her refusal ended the Kamehameha Dynasty.

During her lifetime, the princess witnessed the physical and social decline of Hawaiians. Some foreigners brought disease—the native population dwindled from 400,000 in 1778 to fewer than 45,000 a century later—and controlled most commerce. Missionaries introduced a new value system.

“Distressed by the plight of her people, Princess Pauahi created a will in 1883 as an instrument of change,” says Jolee Chip, Hulihe‘e Palace docent coordinator. “She believed education could be the answer to help her people.”

The document established a charitable land trust overseen by trustees to improve the well being of Hawaiians. It operates as Kamehameha Schools today, one of the largest, private trusts in the nation.

“The will was the princess’s way to malama ka ‘aina—practice the ethical, prudent and culturally appropriate stewardship of land and resources,” adds Chip.

Pauahi married Charles Reed Bishop in 1850. She and Bishop shared a love for traveling, teaching and entertaining and the couple became astute property managers. When her favorite cousin, Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani died, Pauahi received her entire estate (including Hulihe‘e Palace) and this inheritance comprised the major portion of Pauahi’s landholdings. The princess died a year later in 1884. To honor his wife, Charles founded the Bishop Museum in 1889 to house the royal family heirlooms and her extensive collection of Hawaiian artifacts.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.

Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday- Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Event Marks 40th Anniversary of Palace Band, Glee Club

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 12 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

The performance marks the 40th anniversary of the Hulihe’e Palace Band and the Merrie Monarchs glee club. The two organizations were founded in 1976 by the late bandmaster Bud Dant and the late palace curator and performer, Aunty Lei Collins.

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu then he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Jolee Chip, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.

Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday- Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Palace Event Remembers Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka’ahumanu

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe’e on Sunday, Mar. 15. The 4 p.m. event on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace remembers the late Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.  Photo by Fern Gavalek

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 15 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Photo by Fern Gavalek

The event presents the Merrie Monarchs, the Hulihe‘e Palace West Hawai‘i County Band and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Known as the Citizen Prince, Kuhio was born on Kaua‘i and raised by his aunt and uncle, Queen Kapiolani and King Kalakaua, to become successor to the royal throne. After Hawai‘i became a U.S. territory, the Republican Party persuaded Kuhio to enter politics.

Kuhio was named Hawai‘i’s second delegate to the U.S. Congress in 1902 and served the post 10 times. Honored today as the father of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kuhio secured an area of Hawai‘i Island’s Kilauea Volcano in 1916 for public enjoyment. He was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission.

Queen Ka‘ahumanu, who hailed from Hana, Maui, was the favorite wife of Kamehameha the Great.  Though much younger than her husband, Ka‘ahumanu was charismatic, intelligent and politically shrewd. Kamehameha granted her the title of kuhina nui (queen regent) upon his death in 1819. Tired of the Hawaiian laws of kapu that forbade women from certain activities, she convinced the throne’s successor, Liholiho, to overturn the kapu system.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2015 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace West Hawai‘i County Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Palace Event to Remember King Kamehameha

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 8 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Inside Hulihee Palace

Inside Hulihe’e Palace

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu; he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe’e Event Rembembers King Kamehameha IV

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, May 18 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late King Kamehameha IV. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i.

Kamehameha IV, King of Hawaii, 1834-1863. Hawaii State Archives

Kamehameha IV, King of Hawaii, 1834-1863. Hawaii State Archives

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho) was 21 when he inherited the throne in 1855. He agonized over the dwindling native population that was reduced from 300,000 in 1778 to 70,000 in 1855. “Hawaiians had no resistance to the diseases of foreigners and over 6,000 caught smallpox brought to the islands in 1853,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The king and his Queen Emma pushed for the building of a hospital so Hawaiians could get adequate medical care.”

Brought up by a physician, Emma shared her husband’s values on health. Liholiho married Emma Naea Rooke in 1856. She was the granddaughter of John Young, Kamehameha’s British advisor. As was the custom for children in Hawai‘i to be given to relatives for upbringing, Emma was the hanai (adopted) daughter of Dr. T. C. Rooke, an English physician practicing in Honolulu, and Emma’s aunt.

“Besides providing funds, the royal couple earnestly solicited donations from others,” explains Ballao. “In 1860, Kamehameha IV laid the cornerstone for the Queen’s Hospital, which he named to honor his wife.” Today, it is the prestigious Queen’s Medical Center in downtown Honolulu.

The king died when he was 29, a short time after his four-year-old Prince Albert became fatally ill.  A crib used by the prince, during a visit to Kona, is on display at Hulihe‘e.

“Queen Emma became a candidate to the throne but lost a heavily contested election to Prince David Kalakaua,” says Ballao “Queen Emma died at the age of 49.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Crafts and Entertainment at Annual Spring Fundraiser at Hulihe’e Palace

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 29. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe'e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe’e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment.

New this year are cultural demonstrations including pa‘i ‘ai (poi pounding) and ‘upena (fish net making). Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured, including the chance to win a king-sized Hawaiian quilt for a $5 donation.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March: Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual state holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Wednesday, Mar. 26 in 2014.

Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Palace Event Remembers the ‘Peacock Princess’

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 to remember the late Princess Kaiulani. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani was the last heir to the Hawaiian throne. Born in 1875 to Princess Miriam Likelike, she was the niece of King Kalakaua.

“Her father was an Edinburgh Scot named Archibald Cleghorn, who was a governor of O‘ahu,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The young princess, who was especially fond of peacocks, lived in Waikiki at the garden estate of Ainahau. Today, it is the present location of the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.”

A fellow Scot, Robert Lewis Stevenson, became friends with Princess Kaiulani and he wrote numerous poems about his “fair maiden.” Known for her grace and hospitality, Kaiulani traveled abroad and studied in London as a teenager. Though a long way from Hawai‘i, she soon found herself in the fight to save the monarchy from American annexationists.

“Kaiulani went to Washington and visited President Grover Cleveland and his wife to plead her cause,” adds Ballao. “Enchanted by the young, beautiful and fashionable Kaiulani, President Cleveland sent a personal representative to Hawai‘i to report on the political situation.”

Kaiulani’s aunt, Queen Lili‘uokalani, and others suggested the princess choose a husband to help Hawai‘i’s political situation: the nephew of the Emperor of Japan or her Hawaiian cousin, Prince David Kawananakoa. Bitter and disillusioned, Kaiulani realized her chance at the throne was gone forever when Hawai‘i officially became part of the U.S. in August 1898.

A few months later, after attending a wedding at Parker Ranch, Kaiulani got caught in a cold and cutting “Waimea rain” and the princess became seriously ill. “Her father came to the Big Island with the family doctor and Kaiulani improved at Mana enough to be carried by litter to a ship bound for Honolulu,” explains Ballao. “Back at Ainahau, her illness persisted, worsened and she died in two months; Kaiulani was 23 years old.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Also, beginning October 18, the palace will be open 5-8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through the holiday season. Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Palace Event Remembers King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli”

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, August 18 to remember the late King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli.” The fun is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures.

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862. Keywords: Royalty Description: Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma. Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince. Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862.
Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma.
Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince.
Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. Donations are appreciated; kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

“Born in 1813, Kauikeaouli was the second surviving son of Kamehameha the Great and he became king when he was 11 years old,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “During his 30-year reign, he signed the Great Mahele, dividing land among his people; declared the right of religious freedom and instituted the kingdom’s first written constitution.”

In 1843, King Kamehameha III coined Hawai‘i’s motto that appears on the state seal and coat of arms: “`Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono-the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.” The monarch was born at Keauhou Bay and a plaque there marks the birth site.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

Hulihe’e Event Remembers Palace Builder John Adams Kuakini

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, July 21 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late John Adams Kuakini. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i.

 Kuakini, 1791-1844. Governor of Hawaii Island. Original sketch by Rev. William Ellis (Hawaii State Archives)

John Adams Kuakini, 1791-1844,  Governor of Hawaii Island.
Original sketch by Rev. William Ellis (Hawaii State Archives)

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly events that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Kuakini was a cousin to Kamehameha I and governor of Hawai’i Island. A Russian explorer, Captain Otto von Kotzebue, described Kuakini in 1816 as a “herculean figure.”

“Kuakini first built Moku‘aikaua Church, finishing in 1837,” details Casey Ballao, Hulihe‘e docent coordinator. “That same year, he started construction on Hulihe‘e, with the excavation of the cellar. Kuakini employed craftsman and laborers that had jumped sailing ships to build his grand home and it was completed in 1838. It was a great source of pride.”

Kuakini didn’t enjoy his mansion for long; he died at the age of 54 in 1844. His obituary stated he was “the sole survivor of the iron-hearted chiefs that constituted the household of Kamehameha I.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihee Palace Debuts Monthly Oceanside Tea

With a setting and menu befitting of royalty, Hulihe‘e Palace offers a monthly Wilhelmina’s Tea. Served on fine china on the palace’s picturesque oceanside lanai, the 10 a.m. tea includes a hearty array of ribbon sandwiches, scones and tasty tidbits, plus a 45-minute guided tour of Hulihe’e Palace.

Huli Tea

Presented by the Daughters of Hawaii and the Calabash Cousins, the new activity raises funds to purchase Apple iPads for use by visiting students. The two-hour tea is priced at $35 and includes a take-home, mini chocolate Bundt cake favor.

Dates for Wilhelmina’s Tea in 2013 are June 10, July 22, August 19, September 16, October 21, November 18 and December 16. Teas are held the Monday following Afternoon at Hulihe’e during the monthly Kokua Kailua Village Stroll.

Holualoa resident Faye Daniel came up with the idea for the tea as a tribute to her grandmother, an accomplished horsewoman and the first pa’u rider to represent the Territory of Hawai‘i at the California Floral Parade, the precursor to the Tournament of Roses Parade,

“My grandmother Wilhelmina would take me to tea on Sunday at the Wai‘ahole Tea Room on O’ahu,” recalls Daniel, a Daughter of Hawai‘i member. “This tea is a tribute to the memory of a remarkable woman and a true Daughter of Hawai‘i.”

While Daughters and Cousins create the lavish tea fare, Daniel’s brothers provide the delicious shortbread cookies—a family recipe—and the favors. Adding an island twist, homemade lilikoi jam is served with the scones, rather than the traditional clotted cream.

Daniel’s polished Grand Baroque silver tea pot is used to serve the Constant Comment tea and attendees enjoy tea service on an eclectic mix of pretty cups and dishes, all donated by Daughters and Cousins—each contributor’s name appears on the reverse side.

Other palace volunteers who organize the tea and serve guests are Lolly Davis, Sally Inkster, Denise Rosso and Shan Quinn.

“We’re all retired teachers and do this to raise funds so visiting students can have the use of iPads,” details Daniel. “When they’re looking at an artifact here, they can pull it up on Goggle for more info. That’s how you teach kids now.”

The Daughters mentor middle school students, teaching them about Hulihe‘e Palace, the Hawaiian monarchy and culture.

Wilhelmina’s Tea is limited to 20 guests and non-refundable reservations are required; phone 808-329-9555.

Hulihe‘e Palace: Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village Stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

 

 

Hulihe‘e Palace Announces New Museum Hours and Fees

Hulihe‘e Palace is expanding its museum hours to be open on most Mondays, with hours of operation from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. The only exception is on the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll, when the palace is closed in the morning and open 1-4 p.m.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Beginning May 1, admission fees for adult, kama‘aina, military and seniors increase by $2. The new fee schedule follows:

General Admission:

  • Adult:  $8.00 (non-guided tour) $10.00 (guided tour)
  • Kama`aina:  $6.00 (non-guided tour) $8.00 (guided tour)
  • Military:  $6.00 (non-guided tour) $8.00 (guided tour)
  • Seniors: (65)  $6.00 (non-guided tour) $8.00 (guided Tour)
  • Children:  $1.00 (18 years and under)

Visitors can choose from a 45-minute docent-guided tour, a self-guided tour (detailed brochure provided), or can use a personal mobile telephone to access a free “On Cell” audio tour (regular mobile air me fees may apply).

Built in 1838, the two-story Hulihe‘e Palace houses a collection of ancient Hawaiian (pre-Western contact) artifacts and personal memorabilia of 19th century Hawaiian royalty. The palace structure has been painstakingly restored to circa 1885, a period known in Hawaiian history as the Kalakaua Era. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hulihee Palace

Standout furnishings include King Kalakaua’s magnificent armoire that won a silver medal in the 1889 International Exhibition in Paris, a 70-inch table top made from a single piece of koa wood, an ornate steamer trunk used by QueenKapi‘olani to carry belongings to Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, King Kamehameha the Great’s stone exercise ball weighing a whopping 180 pounds and exquisite bed mats made from the endemic makaloa sedge.

Gift shop hours are 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

Hulihe‘e Event Remembers Boy Prince

The Daughters of Hawai‘i present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, April 21 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late Prince Albert. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. The halau is fresh from dancing at the recent Merrie Monarch Festival.

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe'e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe’e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

 “Albert was the only royal Kamehameha of his generation,” notes Casey Ballao, palace docent coordinator. “The baby was named after Queen Victoria’s prince consort, and the British royals agreed to serve as his godparents.”

King Liholiho and his young family enjoyed traveling to the neighbor islands and visited Hulihe‘e Palace several times, favoring the seaside royal residence for vacations from Honolulu’s busy pace. “We have a crib used by the baby prince on display in the palace’s north bedroom,” adds Ballao.

 The north Kauai community of Princeville is named after Prince Albert in honor of his family’s visit there in 1860. Tragically, the prince died at the young age of 4, shortly after he was declared Ka Haku o Hawai‘i (His Royal Highness the Prince of Hawai‘i.)

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  •  Apr 21: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert
  • May 19: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 9: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 21: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 18: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 15: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 20: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 17: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud” Dant
  • Dec 15: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Hulihe‘e Palace Honors Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs accompanied by the Hulihe‘e Palace Band. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.  Photo by Fern Gavalek

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Photo by Fern Gavalek

Known as the Citizen Prince, Kuhio was born on Kaua‘i and raised by his aunt and uncle, Queen Kapiolani and King Kalakaua, to become successor to the royal throne. After Hawai‘i became a U.S. territory, the Republican Party persuaded Kuhio to enter politics

Kuhio was named Hawai‘i’s second delegate to the U.S. Congress in 1902 and served the post 10 times. Honored today as the father of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kuhio secured an area of Hawai‘i Island’s Kilauea Volcano in 1916 for public enjoyment. He was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission.

Queen Ka‘ahumanu, who hailed from Hana, Maui, was the favorite wife of Kamehameha the Great.  Though much younger than her husband, Ka‘ahumanu was charismatic, intelligent and politically shrewd. Kamehameha granted her the title of kuhina nui (queen regent) upon his death in 1819. Tired of the Hawaiian laws of kapu that forbade women from certain activities, she convinced the throne’s successor, Liholiho, to overturn the kapu system.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

 

Crafts, Entertainment at Day at Hulihe’e – Annual Fundraiser Benefits Palace

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 30. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Huli Hula

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment. Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March: Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual statewide holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Tuesday, Mar. 26 in 2013.

Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

 

 

Annual Fundraiser Day at Hulihe‘e Palace

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 30,  2013. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe’e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavelek)

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment. Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March: Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual statewide holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Tuesday, Mar. 26 in 2013.

Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe’e Palace Honors Princess Kaiulani

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21 to remember the late Princess Kaiulani. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani was the last heir to the Hawaiian throne. Born in 1875 to Princess Miriam Likelike, she was the niece of King Kalakaua.

“Her father was an Edinburgh Scot named Archibald Cleghorn, who was a governor of O‘ahu,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The young princess, who was especially fond of peacocks, lived in Waikiki at the garden estate of Ainahau. Today, it is the present location of the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.”

A fellow Scot, Robert Lewis Stevenson, became friends with Princess Kaiulani and he wrote numerous poems about his “fair maiden.” Known for her grace and hospitality, Kaiulani traveled abroad and studied in London as a teenager. Though a long way from Hawai‘i, she soon found herself in the fight to save the monarchy from American annexationists.

Hulihe’e Palace

“Kaiulani went to Washington and visited President Grover Cleveland and his wife to plead her cause,” adds Ballao. “Enchanted by the young, beautiful and fashionable Kaiulani, President Cleveland sent a personal representative to Hawai‘i to report on the political situation.”

Kaiulani’s aunt, Queen Lili‘uokalani, and others suggested the princess choose a husband to help Hawai‘i’s political situation: the nephew of the Emperor of Japan or her Hawaiian cousin, Prince David Kawananakoa. Bitter and disillusioned, Kaiulani realized her chance at the throne was gone forever when Hawai‘i officially became part of the U.S. in August 1898.

A few months later, after attending a wedding at Parker Ranch, Kaiulani got caught in a cold and cutting “Waimea rain” and the princess became seriously ill. “Her father came to the Big Island with the family doctor and Kaiulani improved at Mana enough to be carried by litter to a ship bound for Honolulu,” explains Ballao. “Back at Ainahau, her illness persisted, worsened and she died in two months; Kaiulani was 23 years old.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturdays. Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  • Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

 

 

Hulihe’e Palace Event Remembers Queen Lili‘uokalani

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 to remember Hawai‘i’s most accomplished royal musician and composer, Queen Lili‘uokalani (1838-1917). Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

The sister of King Kalakaua, Lili‘uokalani Kamaka‘eha attended the Royal School and was educated with four other rulers of Hawai‘i. She was given the Christian name Lydia.

“Lydia could read music at an early age and it is thought she had perfect pitch,” notes Casey Ballao, palace administrator. “She played piano, ‘ukulele and the organ—but the zither, which was in vogue in the U.S. and Europe—was her favorite. She also composed music.”

It was on a visit in 1878 to a Windward O‘ahu ranch that Lydia received the imagery and inspiration to pen the song that became the first Hawaiian “hit” outside of the kingdom, “Aloha ‘Oe.” Although Lydia wrote the words as a love song, the chorus and first verse were normally sung and the song became a popular island farewell song.

In 1862, Lydia married John Dominis, who later became the governor of O‘ahu. She acted as regent when Queen Kapiolani traveled abroad to attend the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887.  She took the name Lili‘uokalani in 1891 when it was agreed she would be heir to the throne. Her reign was a tragic one as the monarchy was overthrown in 1893 by American annexationists; the queen peacefully gave up her throne under protest. After an unsuccessful counterrevolution, the queen was imprisoned in ‘Iolani Palace for eight months.

Hulihe‘e Palace

After Lili‘uokalani’s imprisonment, she returned to Washington Place and wrote “Hawai‘i’s Story by Hawai‘i’s Queen.” “In 1909 she set up a fund to help Hawaiian children and today the Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center helps over 2,000 children annually,” added Ballao.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturdays. Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18.

Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Palace

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  • Jan 15: Band appearance remembering King Charles “Lunalilo” and Aunty I‘olani Luahine
  • Feb 19: Event remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 18: Band appearance remembering Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 15: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert
  • May 20: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 10: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 15: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 26: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 16: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Hulihe’e Event Remembers Palace Builder John Adams Kuakini

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, July 15 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late John Adams Kuakini. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i.

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly events that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Kuakini was a cousin to Kamehameha I and governor of Hawai’i Island. A Russian explorer, Captain Otto von Kotzebue, described Kuakini in 1816 as a “herculean figure.”

“Kuakini first built Moku‘aikaua Church, finishing in 1837,” details Casey Ballao, Hulihe‘e docent coordinator. “That same year, he started construction on Hulihe‘e, with the excavation of the cellar. Kuakini employed craftsman and laborers that had jumped sailing ships to build his grand home and it was completed in 1838. It was a great source of pride.”

Kuakini didn’t enjoy his mansion for long; he died at the age of 54 in 1844. His obituary stated he was “the sole survivor of the iron-hearted chiefs that constituted the household of Kamehameha I.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission includes a self-guided tour brochure and remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  • Jan 15: Band appearance remembering King Charles “Lunalilo” and Aunty I‘olani Luahine
  • Feb 19: Event remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 18: Band appearance remembering Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 15: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert
  • May 20: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 10: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 15: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 26: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 16: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Hulihe’e Palace Annual Spring Fundraiser – Day at Hulihe‘e

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 24. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Debuting at the fundraiser is the new cookbook, “Just Like Tutu Made With Love,” which features recipes from palace volunteers and supporters. The handy resource contains instructions for main dishes, salads, pupu, tropical beverages and desserts. It also has helpful everyday hints “for living happily” sprinkled among the pages. It will be available for $9.38 including tax.

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment. Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March, Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual statewide holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Monday, Mar. 26 in 2012. Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Hulihe’e Palace Schedule of Events

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present their first free monthly Afternoon at Hulihe’e for 2012 on Sunday, Jan. 15. The 4 p.m. event on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace remembers the late King Lunalilo and past palace curator, I‘olani Luahine.

The event presents the Hulihe’e Palace Band, the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Charles Lunalilo (1835-1874) was known as the “people’s king” as he was popular with all his subjects. During his abbreviated, 390-day reign, Lunalilo advocated the legislature to remove property qualifications for the right to vote and asked for the separation of the legislature into two houses.  He also thought the kingdom should give Pearl Harbor to the U.S. in exchange for duty-free Hawaiian sugar into California.

“During Lunalilo’s short reign, he tried to make the kingdom’s government more democratic,” notes Casey Ballao, palace docent coordinator. “His efforts were cut short by tuberculosis.”

I‘olani Luahine (1915-1978) served as curator of Hulihe‘e Palace from 1973 to 1978.  She was born Harriet Lanihau Makekau in Napo‘opo‘o, but was renamed I‘olani, after the Hawaiian hawk. Luahine was a master of hula and named a “Living Treasure” in 1972; she was invited three times to perform at the National Folk Festival in Washington D.C.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Jan 15: Band appearance remembering King Charles “Lunalilo” and Aunty I‘olani Luahine

Feb 19: Event remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani

Mar 18: Band appearance remembering Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Prince Kuhio

Apr 15: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert

May 20: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”

Jun 10: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”

Jul 15: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini

Aug 26: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”

Sep 16: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani

Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani

Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant

Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop