• puako-general-store
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    November 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Jul    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Honolulu Harbor Water Quality Appears to Be Returning to Normal Visual Conditions

Divers completed a survey of Honolulu Harbor in the immediate vicinity of the initial release and found no visible evidence of molasses, Tuesday.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The dive survey covered an area on the bottom of the harbor of approximately 200 feet surrounding the source of the initial spill. The diver investigated the areas under the pier around the pilings and along the seabed out into the harbor.

“The seabed under the wharf and into the channel was observed to be in normal condition, with no pools or visual evidence of molasses,” Kevin Foster, U.S. Fish and Wildlife marine ecology specialist. “The consensus was that the molasses is no longer in the area.”

The dive included a live video feed to the surface where representatives from the Department of Land and Natural Resources and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service directed and observed the nearly two hour survey.

Water quality appears to be returning to normal visual conditions. Water sampling and testing continues in the harbor and Keehi Lagoon.

Federal Officials Conduct Water Sampling Tests on Molasses Spill in Honolulu Harbor

Representatives from the Coast Guard National Strike Force, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration conducted water sampling as part of a joint effort to analyze the effects of the molasses spill in Honolulu Harbor Sunday.

Crewmembers from the Coast Guard National Strike Force head to their first location to use a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Crewmembers from the Coast Guard National Strike Force head to their first location to use a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The combined team departed Coast Guard Station Honolulu Sunday morning aboard a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium. The National Strike Force crewmembers from the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Strike Teams used a water quality instrument to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels at various locations around the harbor that were affected by the spill.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The National Strike Force provides highly trained, experienced personnel and specialized equipment to Coast Guard and other federal agencies to facilitate preparedness for and response to oil and hazardous substance pollution incidents in order to protect public health and the environment. The National Strike Force’s area of responsibility covers all Coast Guard Districts and Federal Response Regions.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, handles a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, handles a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The National Strike Force team members arrived in Honolulu Saturday after Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received an official request from the Hawaii Department of Health to assist with the response to the molasses spill in Honolulu Harbor, Friday.

The Coast Guard began supporting the response Monday morning when investigators from Sector Honolulu responded to a report of discolored water in the harbor. Since then, the Coast Guard has held daily meetings with the lead State agency, Hawaii Department of Health. Crews from Station Honolulu have conducted daily patrols in the affected area since Monday.

Crewmembers from the Coast Guard National Strike Force discuss data from a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels with a member of the state of Hawaii Department of Health in Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Crewmembers from the Coast Guard National Strike Force discuss data from a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels with a member of the state of Hawaii Department of Health in Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The request for federal assistance allows the Coast Guard to support the lead agency with a wide variety of resources to include specialized response personnel, boats and equipment from the Coast Guard and other Federal Agencies.

For more information contact the Sector Honolulu public affairs officer, Lt. Kevin Cooper at (808) 286-4675 or the Department of Health Public Information Officer, Janice Okubo at (808) 586-4442.

Governor Abercrombie Responds to Molasses Spill in Honolulu Harbor – Matson Accepts Responsibility

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today released the following statement about the state’s response to the Honolulu Harbor molasses spill:

abercrombieheader
“The emergency response programs of the Department of Health, the aquatic resources division of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, and the Department of Transportation Harbors staff are working as a team to respond to this spill, reduce its impact and protect the health of our people. The affected area is limited to a portion of the Honolulu Harbor channel and Keehi Lagoon.

“Matson accepts responsibility for the spill and is working directly with the state and federal agencies to respond to this unprecedented event.

“My administration will do everything needed to restore harbor channel waters to the highest quality and take all appropriate action to ensure that such a spill will not reoccur.”

Department of Emergency Management – “Stay Out of Honolulu Harbor and Keehi Lagoon… Increased Sightings of Dead Fish”

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) reminds the public to stay out of the water at Honolulu Harbor and Keehi Lagoon, and not to collect or consume any fish or marine life from the area. The dark water plume caused by a large spill of molasses into Honolulu Harbor on Sept. 9 persists today.

Mollasses Fish

DOH has tripled the size of the clean up crew in response to reports of increased sightings of dead fish; there are now three (3) boat crews working during daylight hours removing dead fish from the waters of Honolulu Harbor and Keehi Lagoon. As of yesterday, hundreds of dead fish have been collected. It is expected that thousands of dead fish will be collected and many more killed by the contaminated water. Fish collected are documented and are being kept on ice for possible testing. Water monitoring samples are collected daily to determine the location and concentration of the molasses contamination. This data will enable DOH to estimate the impact and duration of the contamination.
Mollasses Fish
It is anticipated that the plume may remain visible for weeks as the natural tides and currents slowly flush harbor waters into Keehi Lagoon and out to sea. Areas where the public normally has access to the lagoon and harbor have been posted with warning signs. DOH, the Departments of Land and Natural Resources and Transportation management staff and law enforcement officers are patrolling the affected area to regulate public access and ensure safety.

Matson has acknowledged their responsibility for the molasses spill and is working with state and federal agencies to assist with the spill response activities.

Coast Guard Rescues Dog Found Swimming in Middle of Honolulu Harbor

The Coast Guard rescued a dog who was found swimming in the middle of Honolulu Harbor, Saturday.

The Coast Guard rescued a dog who was found swimming by itself in the middle of Honolulu Harbor, Aug. 24, 2013. The dog was rescued by crewmembers at Coast Guard Station Honolulu and taken back to the station. U.S. Coast Guard photo

The Coast Guard rescued a dog who was found swimming by itself in the middle of Honolulu Harbor, Aug. 24, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo

The dog was initially spotted struggling to swim by a tug boat crew transiting the harbor. The harbormaster’s office relayed the information to watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu.

Sector Honolulu launched a 25-foot Response Boat – Small crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu. The dog was rescued by the crew at 11:30 a.m., and transported back to the station.

The Coast Guard rescued a dog who was found swimming by itself in the middle of Honolulu Harbor, Aug. 24, 2013. The dog was rescued by crewmembers at Coast Guard Station Honolulu and taken back to the station. U.S. Coast Guard photo

The dog was rescued by crewmembers at Coast Guard Station Honolulu and taken back to the station. U.S. Coast Guard photo

“The Coast Guard hopes we can reunite this dog with his family as soon as possible,” said Lt. Kevin Cooper, command duty officer at Sector Honolulu. “We understand that it’s tough for everyone when a dog goes missing, so we’re asking for the public’s help to get him home.”

Anyone with information about the dog is asked to contact Coast Guard Station Honolulu at (808) 842-2980.

 

Governor Abercrombie Releases $113 Million for Hawaii’s Airports and Harbors

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced the release of $113 million for various capital improvement projects (CIP) at airports and harbors throughout the State of Hawaii.

abercrombieheader

“These important projects will improve the airport experience across the state – from Hilo to Lihue – as well as the efficiency and capacity at our harbors,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “Funding for many of the Honolulu Harbor improvements are part of a larger New Day Work Project that will increase harbor shipping capacity.”

Allotment of funds for the following priority projects, identified by members of the state Legislature, has been approved by the Governor:

Airports

  • $50,000,000 – Kahului Airport, Maui – Construction for a multi-lane access road from Hana Highway to the Airport Loop Road; this segment of the Kahului Airport Access Road will connect with the state Highway Division’s segment starting on Hana Highway
  • $9,800,000 – Kona International Airport at Keahole, Hawaii Island – Construction for the re-roofing of the terminal building
  • $3,000,000 – Kahului Airport, Maui – Phase I construction for restroom renovations, including the addition of restroom air conditioning
  • $590,000 – Kona International Airport at Keahole, Hawaii Island – Construction for security improvements at security checkpoints and the Airport Operations Area fence
  • $400,000 – Honolulu International Airport, Oahu – Additional funds to complete the installation of a security access control system and video monitoring equipment; the  additional construction funds are to address unforeseen site conditions relating to the existing electrical conduits and fiber optic cable backbone
  • $378,000 – Pavement Management System, Phase 1, statewide – Evaluation of the pavement conditions at Honolulu International and Kahului Airports to produce program reports to fulfill Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements, plan future projects, and determine which areas need repairs or reconstruction
  • $198,716 – Molokai Airport, Molokai – Construction of a new box culvert to replace the existing trapezoidal ditch adjacent to the taxiway; this will bring the taxiway safety area into compliance with current FAA regulations
  • $160,000 – Car rental facilities, statewide – Additional plans to provide preparation of studies, project definition reports, surveys, appraisals, and conceptual plans for program management of car rental facilities at Honolulu International Airport, Kahului Airport, Lihue Airport, and Kona International Airport at Keahole
  • $152,000 – Pavement Management System, Phase 2, statewide – Evaluation of the pavement conditions at Kona International, Hilo International, and Lihue Airports to produce program reports to fulfill FAA requirements, plan future projects, and determine which areas need repairs or reconstruction

Harbors

  • $10,000,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Construction of new mooring structures and upgrades to existing utilities and infrastructure at Piers 12 and 15 to accommodate the relocation of the Clean Island Council and Marine Spill Response Corporation vessels from Pier 35
  • $9,500,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Construction of site improvements including utilities, pavement, and a new box culvert to support the relocation of the UH Marine Center from the Kapalama Military Reservation
  • $8,500,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Construction for renovation of the existing building and related utilities at Pier 35 to accommodate the relocation of the University of Hawaii School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (UH SOEST) from the proposed new Kapalama Container Terminal project site
  • $7,500,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Design for the new Kapalama Container Terminal project to support expanding maritime activities in the harbor, as part of the Harbors New Day Work Project; the design funds will be used for Phase 2 of the project to prepare plans, designs, specifications, and cost estimates to construct a new container yard, roadways and gates, buildings, security fencing, utility infrastructure improvements, and related activities
  • $6,000,000 – Hilo Harbor, Hawaii Island – Construction to widen Kumau Street at Hilo Harbor to accommodate container, cargo and vehicle movements between Pier 4 and Kalanianaole Avenue
  • $2,000,000 – Kalaeloa Barbers Point Harbor, Oahu – Plans to develop a dedicated fuel berth at the Piers P-3 and P-4 areas as well environmental documentation and preparation of a comprehensive master plan to guide future harbor development
  • $1,800,000 – Hilo Harbor, Hawaii – Construction management and inspections services for a new pier and related utilities at Pier 4 and to widen Kumau Street to accommodate cargo movement and vehicles
  • $1,450,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Construction management and inspection services for the rehabilitation of buildings and yard areas at Piers 34/35, improvements to the utility systems, pavement overlay, and construction of a new box culvert
  • $1,000,000 – Honolulu Harbor, Oahu – Construction management and inspection services for the construction of new mooring structures and upgrade of existing utilities and infrastructure at Piers 12 and 15 to accommodate the relocation of the Clean Island Council and Marine Spill Response Corporation vessels that will be relocated from Pier 35
  • $600,000 – Kahului Harbor, Maui – Design to relocate the Harbors Maui District Office and demolish the existing office and a store facility in accordance with the Kahului Harbor Development Plan

DLNR Statement on Yesterdays Whales in Honolulu Harbor

A pair of humpback whales, likely a mother and its yearling, entered Honolulu Harbor yesterday and spent time within the harbor near Pier 35, and later Pier 29, moved out of the harbor this afternoon and were headed out to sea by 1:45 p.m. yesterday. Earlier reports called these two animals a mother and calf.

Whales spotted in Honolulu Harbor Yesterday

DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) sent a patrol boat with two officers about 11 a.m. to Honolulu harbor to continue to maintain a safety zone around the whales. They relieved Coast Guard officials who had been monitoring the whales since the morning.

There were reports of four additional whales early in the morning near Pier 2, but these could not be confirmed.

DLNR reminds boaters that the months of November through May are humpback season in Hawaii, and reminds boaters to be alert and watch for whales in Hawaii waters to avoid whale strikes. Vessel operators and other ocean users are required to stay at least 100 yards away from them at all times. Humpback whales are an endangered species and are protected by State and Federal laws.

“We are grateful for the coordinated efforts of DOCARE, the Coast Guard, Honolulu Harbor Marine Traffic Control, and NOAA, who together ensured the safety of both the whales and boaters today,” said Elia Herman, State Co-Manager of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary. “We also appreciate the efforts of ocean users who first sighted and reported the animals in the Harbor.”

To report a marine mammal in trouble (injured, stranded, or entangled whale, dolphin or seal) please call the NOAA Marine Mammal Hotline: 1-888-256-9840 or the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) statewide hotline: 643-DLNR (3567).

Please report immediately and keep your distance, for your safety. Injured, sick or entangled animals can be unpredictable and dangerous.

The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, which is jointly managed by the State of Hawai‘i and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, lies within the shallow warm waters surrounding the main Hawaiian Islands and constitutes one of the world’s most important humpback whale habitats.