• puako-general-store
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    October 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Jul    
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    2728293031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Hawaii Wildlife Center Recent Cases

The Hawaii Wildlife Center listed the following birds that had been cared for in their most recent Wildlife Hospital Update.
tiny bird
Recent Cases:

  • Ua‘u kani (Wedge-tailed Shearwater) from O‘ahu – Case notes: downed
  • Koa‘e ‘ula (Red-tailed Tropicbird) from O‘ahu – Case notes: downed
  • Pueo (Hawaiian Owl) from Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: Suspected rodenticide poisoning
  • Ae‘o (Hawaiian Stilt) from O‘ahu – Case notes: orphaned chick
  • ‘Ewa‘ewa (Sooty Tern) from O‘ahu – Case notes: found struggling in the water
  • Koa‘e ‘ula (Red-tailed Tropicbird) from Kona, Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: Found offshore and could not fly
  • Least Tern from Kona, Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: poor feather condition, required decontamination
  • 2 ‘Auku‘u (Black-crowned Night-Heron) from ‘Oahu – Case notes: Suspected siblings, orphaned
  • ‘Io (Hawaiian Hawk) from Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: Young chick with infected crop
  • ‘Alae ke‘oke‘o (Hawaiian Coot) from Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: Wing injury Pueo (Hawaiian Owl) from Hawai‘i Island – Case notes: Found downed
  • Pueo (Hawaiian Owl) from Maui – Case notes: Injured wing

Recent Releases

  • 2 ‘Auku‘u (Black-crowned Night-Heron) from O‘ahu
  • ‘Auku‘u (Black-crowned Night-Heron) from Hawai‘i Island
  • Least Tern from Hawai‘i Island
  • Pueo from Hawai‘i Island

Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach Program

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund is pleased to announce that it will begin its Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach “MDKEO” program on Hawaiʻi Island this Fall.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point.  Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

Handpainted keiki output from the HWF workshop at the “GEMS” (Girls Exploring Math & Science) program in Keauhou last year. Photo by M Lamson/HWF

This program will bring two marine science mentors into 20 different elementary schools (K – 5th grade classrooms) to introduce topics like ocean circulation, marine ecology, and human impacts (like marine debris).  Mentors will work with receptive Hawaiʻi Island teachers to coordinate relevant student activities that meet the math and science benchmarks and “Common Core” standards for the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Education for each grade level.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point.  Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point. Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

These in-class lectures will conclude with student presentations of potential solutions to reduce marine debris here in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere throughout the Pacific Basin.

The program will culminate with a family “Beach Cleanup Day” at local marine debris hubs like Kamilo Point (Kaʻū), Pololu (North Kohala), Kānekanaka Point (South Kohala), Cape Kumukahi (Puna), Kaipalaoa (Hilo), and Oʻoma (Kona).  This MDKEO program began with financial support from a HWF t-shirt fundraiser and will now be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program.

“Microplastics” photograph given with permission by HWF volunteer Sean P. King.

“Microplastics” photograph given with permission by HWF volunteer Sean P. King.

For more info about this marine debris prevention program or to sign up a classroom, please contact Catherine at spina.HWF@gmail.com; and for more info about volunteering for our next Kaʻū coastal cleanup event, contact Megan at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com  or 808/769-7629. Find additional resources and details about HWF’s ongoing conservation projects online at www.wildhawaii.org.

Hawai‘i Wildlife Center Receives Wildlife Rescue Vehicle

Native birds and bats throughout the state now have a vehicle just for them at the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center.  Thanks to a generous challenge grant by the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation and dozens of individuals who rallied together to answer the challenge, the new state-of-the-art native wildlife rehabilitation facility now has an official vehicle that provides wildlife transport to and from the Center.

HWC Founder, President and Center Director Linda Elliott with the new wildlife rescue vehicle

HWC Founder, President and Center Director Linda Elliott with the new wildlife rescue vehicle

The new wildlife rescue vehicle could not have come at a better time.  Since the official launch of wildlife care in September 2012, the HWC has received sick and injured animals from all main Hawaiian Islands, many of which have needed to be picked up from the airport or from the pier.  With activity continuing to increase, the new vehicle provides a peace of mind that there will always be a safe, reliable vehicle available for wildlife rescue missions.

Says HWC Founder, President and Center Director Linda Elliott, “this vehicle is extremely meaningful to us because it is a telling show of support from our statewide and national ‘ohana and our local community. We are thrilled to receive this critical resource and are excited about how it will increase our response capacity for the benefit of Hawai‘i’s native wildlife. Mahalo to everyone who made this happen!”

The vehicle has only been at the facility for two weeks, but has already been used to rescue a downed Newell’s Shearwater and to pick up supplies for the two Maui Nene and one O‘ahu ‘Auku‘u currently in care.

As the only facility of its kind in the State, HWC is continuously working on expanding its network of volunteer transporters to get sick and injured animals to the Center for care and healed, healthy animals to their appropriate release location, including back to their island of origin when necessary. If you would like to become a member of the HWC Wings for Wildlife air transport team or the Wheels for Wildlife ground transport team, please contact the Center at (808) 884-5000, info@hawaiiwildlifecenter.org. Individuals from all islands are welcomed to join.

Wings for Wildlife Air Transport Information: http://www.hawaiiwildlifecenter.org/wings-for-wildlife-air-rescue-team.html

Wheels for Wildlife Ground Transport Information: http://www.hawaiiwildlifecenter.org/wheels-for-wildlife-ground-transport-team.html

National Wildlife Federation Certifies New Wildlife Habitat at the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center in Kapa‘au, Hawai‘i

National Wildlife Federation (NWF) announces that the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center’s (HWC) native garden, located in Kapa‘au, Hawai‘i, is now recognized as an official Certified Wildlife Habitat site. The property attracts a variety of birds, butterflies and other local animals by providing a wildlife-friendly landscape.

The NWF certification sign now sits proudly in the main garden area at HWC.

The NWF certification sign now sits proudly in the main garden area at HWC.

The HWC focuses on the protection of Hawai‘i’s native species through hands-on care, research and education and recognizes the connection between the heritage and culture of all native species, plant or animal, to the land. The HWC native garden benefits many species of native insects and birds, plays an important role in uniting the cultural heritage with the mission of the HWC, brings community together to help native wildlife flourish and reawakens the connections to the customs and traditions of Hawai’i. The garden was planted by local community members of all ages, many of whom still dedicate their time to help maintain it.

NWF began the Certified Wildlife Habitat program in 1973, and has since certified almost 150,000 habitats nationwide. The majority of these sites represent the hard work and commitment of individuals and families providing habitat near their homes, but NWF has also certified more than 3000 schools and hundreds of business and community sites.

Any nature enthusiast can create a certified habitat and learn the rewards of gardening for wildlife.  NWF teaches the importance of environmental stewardship by providing guidelines for making landscapes more hospitable to wildlife.  In order to become certified, a property must provide the four basic elements that all wildlife need:  food, water, cover and places to raise young. In addition to providing for wildlife, certified habitats conserve our natural resources by reducing or eliminating the need for fertilizers, pesticides, and/or irrigation water, which ultimately protects the air, soil and water throughout our communities.

Habitats not only nurture year-round resident birds but also provide stopover sites for migratory birds traveling between their summer and winter ranges. Biologist Mark Hostetier of the University of Florida says that “urban environments are an important factor in the future conservation of many species. Not only has urban sprawl grown into the paths of stopover sites on bird flyways, but the sheer volume of human development has changed the amount of area available for nesting and overwintering.”

Creating habitats not only helps wildlife, it can help reduce global warming pollution and save energy costs as well.  Burning fossil fuels to heat and cool our homes and maintain our lawns releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, which is the main greenhouse gas responsible for global warming.  Replacing lawns with strategically located trees and other native vegetation can insulate our homes from heat, cold and wind, reducing our heating and cooling needs and thus our carbon dioxide emissions.  Unlike lawns, wildlife-friendly native plants don’t need constant maintenance from gas guzzling lawn mowers or fertilizers that require fossil fuels to manufacture.  An additional benefit is that plants actually absorb carbon dioxide, helping to further reduce the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.  All of this adds up to increased areas available for wildlife habitats, reductions in levels of carbon dioxide that cause global warming, and reduced energy costs.  More information about how gardeners can reduce the effects of global warming can be found at www.nwf.org/gardenersguide.

Continue reading

TODAY: Help the Hawaii Wildlife Center in the National Toyota Contest

Vote for the Hawaii Wildlife Center TODAY on the Toyota 100 Cars for Good Website, www.100carsforgood.com.

You can also visit the website and sign up for a reminder. Just search “Hawaii Wildlife Center” in the browse orgs tab.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/a0q-IQbpfLs]

If the Hawaii Wildlife Center gets the most votes that day, it will win a car that will be used for the transport of sick, injured or oiled native wildlife to the center so the animals can get treatment. Many of these species are threatened or endangered, so any animal that we can successfully rehabilitate and return to the wild is of tremendous value.

Hawaii Wildlife Center Grand Opening This Weekend

Following years of fundraising, grant writing, designing and permitting, and hundreds of hours of volunteer efforts, the Hawaii Wildlife Center will celebrate its grand opening on Saturday, November 19, 2011 from 10:30am until 12:30pm.

“It has indeed been a long and rewarding journey. There are far too many individuals, companies and organizations to thank but on behalf of our board of directors, we are enormously grateful and excited to finally be opening our doors and implementing our vision,” said Linda Elliott, Hawaii Wildlife Center President and Director. Elliott adds that the public is invited to attend the grand opening.

Linda Elliott

Kumu Hula Raylene Ha’alelea Kawaiaea will conduct the blessing and invited dignitaries will be given the opportunity to express their support of the Hawaii Wildlife Center.  Following the symbolic untying of a maile lei, Kohala Middle School students will provide tours of the facility for guests. There will be performances by haumana (students) of Kohala Hula Halau Kalaniumi Aliloa O Hawaii Nei and entertainment by Na Hoku Hanohano and Grammy award-winning slack key guitarist John Keawe.

Fundraising is ongoing for Hawaii Wildlife Center to ensure there are sufficient monies to operate, provide staffing and develop programs.

The HWC’s mission – to protect, conserve and aid in the recovery of Hawaii’s native wildlife through hands-on treatment, research, training, science education and cultural programs – will be achieved through the integrated operation of three related components: the wildlife treatment facility, an interpretive lanai and an education pavilion. The 4,500 square foot building includes rooms for wildlife intake, holding, washing, drying, food preparation, lab work, medical treatment and isolation. The HWC’s location on just over two acres of land provides sufficient space for an outdoor Recovery Yard. Public visitation is welcomed to enhance awareness of conservation issues and challenges. The Education pavilion will be used for training, public lectures and related projects including opportunities for collaboration with the Kohala School Complex for hands on learning programs in math, science and conservation both during and after school.

On November 19 the Hawaii Wildlife Center becomes the first state-of-the-art response facility in the Pacific islands exclusively for native wildlife. The HWC will provide for the best achievable medical and husbandry care for sick, injured, contaminated and orphaned native wildlife, including those affected by natural and man-made disasters and by returning those successfully treated animals back to the wild.

Visit www.HawaiiWildlifeCenter.org to learn more or to make a donation.

Hawaii Wildlife Center Reaches Major Milestone

Media Release:

Linda Elliott, Hawaii Wildlife Center President and Director announced recently that the Hawaii Wildlife Center in Kapaau has reached a major milestone. Following a tour of the facility and a briefing of the organization’s goal to help preserve Hawaii’s native wildlife, a generous donor provided  funds needed  to complete construction of the building’s interior.

“I cannot express how grateful I am that this caring  individual really understood what we’re trying to accomplish here,” said Elliott. “Our fundraising will never end since as a non-profit we still need money to operate,  provide staffing and develop programs, but this donation is huge in many ways and means our doors will finally open.”

The Hawaii Wildlife Center is planning a Grand Opening in November, allowing Tinguely Construction and other sub-contractors sufficient time to complete the build-out.

Hawaii Wildlife Center exterior is completed. Recent funding provides for interior build out with grand opening soon thereafter.

Hawaii Wildlife Center exterior is completed. Recent funding provides for interior build out with grand opening soon thereafter.

The Center’s objectives – to protect, conserve and aid in the recovery of Hawaii’s native wildlife through hands-on treatment, research, training, science education and cultural programs – will be achieved through the integrated operation of three related components: the wildlife treatment facility, an interpretive lanai and an education pavilion. The 4,500 square foot building includes rooms for wildlife intake, holding, washing, drying, food preparation, lab work, medical treatment and isolation. The Center’s location on just over two acres of land provides sufficient space for an outdoor Recovery Yard. Public visitation will be encouraged to enhance awareness of conservation issues and challenges. The Education pavilion will be used for training, public lectures and related projects including opportunities for collaboration with the Kohala School Complex for hands on learning programs in math, science and conservation both during and after school.

Joining the anonymous donor in helping Hawaii Wildlife Center reach this final construction phase milestone are a combination of many individual donors, in-kind donations, and grants from The
Thomas J. Long Foundation, Cooke Foundation, Ltd., Hawaii Electric Light Co., Cleo Foundation, The Pettus Foundation, Kaulaunani Urban Forestry Cost-Share Grant, Change Happens Foundation and Patagonia Environmental Grants.

The Hawaii Wildlife Center was acknowledged recently by Scenic Hawaii, Inc. with an Award of Honor in the Community Gardens category presented during the 2011 Betty Crocker Landscape Awards dinner on Oahu. The awards are held annually to recognize the many people who work every day to make Hawaii a more beautiful place. Landscape Architect Jason Umemoto of Umemoto Cassandro Design Corporation generously donated time and expertise when hundreds of volunteers planted Loulu Lelo, Ho’awa, Ae’Ae, Uki’Uki, Palapalai fern, Naio Papa, Pohinahina, Akia and many native plants at the Hawaii Wildlife Center and this award validates their efforts.

About Hawaii Wildlife Center
The Hawaii Wildlife Center will become the first state-of-the-art response facility in the Pacific islands exclusively for native wildlife. The HWC will provide for the best achievable medical and husbandry care for sick, injured, contaminated and orphaned native wildlife, including those affected by natural and man-made disasters and by returning those successfully treated animals back to the wild.  Visit www.HawaiiWildlifeCenter.org to learn more or to make a donation.

Hawaii Wildlife Center Update

Media Release:

Construction at the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center (HWC) is progressing along with continued fundraising efforts to insure project completion.

Cement truck and progress

The Center’s foundation was recently poured following installation of plumbing and wastewater systems. Framing begins next and will be followed by roofing and siding, all planned for completion before the end of 2009.

“We can see excitement building as the community follows our progress,” said Hawaii Wildlife Center President and Director Linda Elliott. “We are now working hard to raise the last 24% of construction monies by the targeted February 2010 completion of the exterior of the Center. This next phase of building funds, estimated at $800,000, will include the completion of the interior and education facilities of the HWC.

“We are grateful to our supporters and the design/construction team that have gotten us to this point,” Elliott enthused. “We are also pleased to report that due to material donations and discounted services from participating suppliers and sub-contractors we are coming in under budget for the exterior phase of construction.”

Even as the holiday season approaches and the Hawaii Wildlife Center celebrates this latest construction and fundraising benchmark, help is still needed to complete all phases of construction by summer 2010.  Tax deductible donations of any amount are accepted and each one is considered critical in making this wildlife conservation and response resource a reality.

Foundation

The HWC will be the first native wildlife emergency response center in Hawaii. The Center’s goal is to save, rehabilitate and release threatened Hawaiian wildlife back into the wild. The HWC will also train volunteers and agency staff to respond to oil spills and other catastrophic events.

Donations may be mailed to the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center , PO Box 551752 , Kapaau , HI 96755 or may be made securely online through HWC’s web site, www.HawaiiWildlifeCenter.org.