Lava Continues to Flow to Ocean Creating Dangerous Lava Deltas

Lava continues to flow into the ocean at Kamokuna, with two main entry areas, both forming lava deltas. The eastern lava delta is the larger of the two, and today, a broad span of small lava streams entering the sea was creating a wide ocean entry plume.

The smaller western entry was feeding a weaker plume.

The smaller western entry was feeding a weaker plume.

Another view of the ocean entries, with the eastern entry in the foreground.

For scale, a boat can be seen in the lower left portion of the image.

For scale, a boat can be seen in the lower left portion of the image.

A breakout from the base of the pali, which began last week, remained active today, with scattered pāhoehoe lobes near the eastern margin of the 61g lava flow.

Fume from the lava tubes on the pali can be seen in the upper left part of the image.

Fume from the lava tubes on the pali can be seen in the upper left part of the image.

Kīlauea’s summit lava lake remains at a high level

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The lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea remained at a high level today, about 18 m (60 ft) from the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at the time of this photo.

 

Wordless Wednesday – As The Lava Approaches My House

Lava Flow 910

Hawaii Volcanoes Lava Flow Update – Flow Remains Active

Kahaualeʻa 2 flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, which began just over a year ago, remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Activity on the flow seems to have diminished slightly over the past two weeks, following deflation at the summit. Today, the flow front (in the foreground) was at 8.8 km (5.5 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but the front had stalled with active breakouts present a short distance behind the flow front. The farthest active breakouts, at about 8.4 km (5.2 miles) northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, can be spotted by the small smoke plume just behind the flow front. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the distance in the left portion of the photograph.

On the left, a normal photograph shows the front of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow. On the right, a thermal image shows a similar angle but in the infrared. Warm, but inactive, portions of the flow are shown by the purple and red colors, while the white and yellow areas shows active breakouts. As the thermal image shows, the flow front was inactive today, with the farthest active breakouts (also visible by the smoke plume) present several hundred meters (yards) behind the flow front.
A closer view of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow front. The leading tip of the flow, inactive today, is in the upper right portion of the photograph. The small smoke plume is caused by active breakouts on the flow margin.

Top: Another look at the margin of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow. Small vegetation fires triggered by the active lava spread a short distance out from the flow margin. Bottom: A near-vertical look at the margin of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow. Numerous trees surrounded by the slowly moving pāhoehoe lava were burned through at their base, causing them to eventually fall over onto the flow itself. In many cases, by the time the tree falls over, the lava crust is no longer hot enough to ignite the wood, leaving a relatively intact tree resting on the flow surface. These fallen trees can make mapping the flow margin on foot very difficult.

A lone time-lapse camera, perched on a mound of solidified lava spatter, withstands thick volcanic fume and brutal weather to provide a record of lava pond activity in the northeast portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. This spot is also the vent area for the Kahaualeʻa 2 lava flow.

Lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater remains active

The lava lake remains active in the Overlook crater, which is nested within the larger Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. The Overlook crater today was filled with thick fume, making visual observations of the lava lake difficult.

Another view of the Overlook crater, comparing the visual photograph with a thermal image taken from a similar position. The thermal camera can “see” through thick fume, providing an unobstructed view of the crater and lava lake. The thermal image clearly shows the inner ledge along the south wall of the Overlook crater, with the active lake surface well below the level of the ledge.

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory Update

February 7, 2014 – Lava flows remain active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and a lava pond in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater

A wide view of activity from the east rift zone to the summit. In the foreground, Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater emits fume from numerous sources on the crater floor. One of these cones hosts a small lava pond, and can be seen at the far right edge of the photo, marked by a small bit of incandescence. Snow-covered Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea are in the distance (left and right sides of photo, respectively). In front of Mauna Loa, the plume from the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu crater can be seen drifting west.

Top: A closer view of the lava pond at the northeast spatter cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. The pond is about 10 m (about 30 ft) wide, and was undergoing cycles of gas pistoning. The lava level would slowly and quietly rise a meter (yard) or more over about five minutes, and vigorous spattering would commence. As the gas was released, the lava level would drop to its previous level and the cycle would begin again.  Bottom: Pāhoehoe breakouts were scattered at the far end of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow today, as far as 6.9 km (4.3 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. This photo shows some typical activity on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, with snow-covered Mauna Kea in the distance.

A close-up view of the lava pond in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. The lava surface was quietly rising when this photo was taken. When the lava reached a critical level, vigorous spattering would begin at the large area of incandescence seen here. The rim of the lava pond is covered in a thick coating of spatter from similar events.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Update – Lava Flow Still Advancing Through Forest Northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Kahaualeʻa 2 flow is still advancing through the forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Click Image to Enlarge

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, with the flow front this week consisting of a narrow finger that has reached 7.5 km (4.7 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flow front has cut a narrow swath through the forest, and is igniting numerous small fires. The smell of smoke can sometimes be detected when the winds carry the smoke into populated areas. The vent for the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, which can be seen in the upper left portion of the image.

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View of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southwest. The vent for the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow is on the near side of the crater, close to the center of the photograph (but obscured by white fume). The Kahaualeʻa 2 lava tube that is supplying lava to the flow front in the forest (see photo above) goes down the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, and is marked by a line of fume extending towards the lower right corner of the photo. The lava tube that supplied the Peace Day flow (now inactive) extends to the southeast (towards the lower left corner of the photo) and is marked by a line of faint fume sources.