• puako-general-store
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    December 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Jul    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Kalapana Bee Buddy Festival

Join us in celebrating the first Bee Buddy Festival in Kalapana at Uncle Robert’s Kava Club, September 15, 2012 from noon to 4pm. Learn how to be a Bee Buddy and keep the honey flowing.

Living on Hawaii Island, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and farthest away from landfall, the honeybees, major pollinators of our food supply are vitally important to us.

We are facing a difficult time with many bees dying from various assaults, including virroa mites, small hive beetle, GMO plants and toxic substances on our aina and shortage of good bee food. As well, honeybees have been mysteriously disappearing across the planet, literally vanishing from their hives.

Known as Colony Collapse Disorder, this phenomenon has brought beekeepers to crisis in an industry responsible for producing apples, coffee, mac nuts, mangos, broccoli, watermelon, onions, cherries and a hundred other fruits and vegetables. Commercial honeybee operations pollinate crops that make up one out of every three bites of food on our tables.

Bee Buddy’s was created to provide information and solutions so everyone from keiki to kupuna can have a part to play in helping bring our honeybees back and making our local environment more conducive to their wellbeing. Plus, it helps us continue to enjoy the foods they so generously pollinate to keep us well fed.

Alison Yahna of Artemis Smiles will preview her trailer “Temple for the Divine Honeybee”. Alison says, “Artemis Smiles Honeybee Sanctuary is dedicated to restoring a reverent, loving and mutually beneficial relationship between bees and humans.  We practice spirit-centered beekeeping and direct communication with the Honeybees.  The bees have helped us understand why they are “vanishing” and what they need for their health and protection.”

[youtube=http://youtu.be/3giFDIRZIgE]

We will be featuring bee products, bee movies (The Vanishing of the Bees), Talk story sessions with bee keepers, apiary technician Lauren Rusert from the State Apiary program, theme song, information handouts, seed give-aways, plus entertainment featuring Diana Aki, Princess Keli’iho’omalu, and a proclamation from Mayor Kenoi in support of Bee Buddies.

We will be introducing our new website: www.beebuddieshawaii.com.

Email us at: beebuddieshawaii@yahoo.com or call Star at 896 8658 for more information. If you’d like to participate we are asking people to come share their favorite uses of honey and bee products. ‘What are you doing with your honey’ is a new addition to our Bee Buddy project.

Star is available for interviews and to set up local Bee Buddy gatherings in your neighborhood.

Highly Contagious Honey Bee Virus Transmitted by Mites

Researchers in Hawaii and the UK report that the parasitic ‘Varroa’ mite has caused the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) to proliferate in honey bee colonies. This association is now thought to contribute to the world-wide spread and probable death of millions of honey bee colonies. The current monetary value of honey bees as commercial pollinators in the United States alone is estimated at about $15-$20 billion annually.

Bees with varroa mite

The research conducted in Hawaii by researchers at Sheffield University, the Marine Biological Association, FERA and University of Hawaii, and reported in the journal Science (8 June 2012), showed how Varroa caused DWV – a known viral pathogen – to increase its frequency among honey bee colonies from 10% to 100%. This change was accompanied by a million-fold increase in the number of virus particles infecting each honey bee and a massive reduction in viral strain diversity leading to the emergence of a single ‘virulent’ DWV strain. As the mite and new virulent strain of virus becomes established across the Hawaiian islands the new emerging viral landscape will mirror that found across the rest of the world where Varroa is now established.

This ability of a mite to permanently alter the honey bee viral landscape may by a key factor in the recent colony collapse disorder (CCD) and over-wintering colony losses (OCL) as the virulent pathogen strain remains even after the mites are removed.

Honey bee populations can experience spectacular crashes. The most recent being the well publicized colony collapse disorder (CCD), but its cause remains a mystery.

Varroa is a large mite (~1.5mm x1mm) that lives on the surface of honeybees, feeding off their blood and reproducing on their developing brood.

The arrival and spread of Varroa across the Hawaiian Islands offered a unique opportunity during 2009 and 2010 to track the evolutionary change in the honey bee virus landscape.

The mite facilitates the spread of viruses by acting as a viral reservoir and incubator, although four bee viruses often associated with CCD (Kashmir bee, Slow paralysis, Acute bee paralysis and Israeli acute paralysis virus) were not influenced by Varroa in Hawaii.

One bee virus, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), has been implicated in colony losses, for example over wintering colony losses (OCL), as it appears to become ubiquitous wherever Varroa occurs.

DWV is naturally transmitted between bees via feeding or during mating. However, the mites introduce DWV directly into the bee’s blood while feeding so creating a new viral transmission route that bypasses many of the bees’ natural defensive barriers.

DWV is a tiny virus similar in structure to polio or foot and mouth virus and has only 9 genes.

DWV infected bees may display the classic wing deformity, but the vast majority of infected bees do not show any morphological signs of infection.

The dominant strain found on Oahu and now Big Island is identical to that found in other areas of the world indicating that the situation on Hawaii is a mirror to what has happened right across the globe.

Based on comparisons between the 2009 and 2010 the changes in viral diversity associated with Varroa appear stable and persist even after the parasite levels are reduced via mite treatments.

 

Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us?

Media Release:

The Kohala Center invites you to “Queen of the Sun: What are the bees telling us?playing November 9 -11 at 7 pm at Honoka’a People’s Theatre. Queen of the Sun is a profound, alternative look at the global honeybee crisis from Taggart Siegel, award-winning director of The Real Dirt on Farmer John (showing in Honoka’a @ 5 pm on Nov 9 & 11). Special event night on Wednesday, November 10th with local beekeepers.