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10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival at Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden

Hawai‘i Forest and Trail Presents A Grow Hawaiian Weekend

The 10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Weekend on Friday and Saturday,  February 21 and 22, is a celebration of Hawaiian cultural and natural history at Amy Greenwell Garden in Captain Cook.  Admission to the Garden will be free on those two days, and all of the activities are free.

Kai'uhane Morton

Ka’uhane Morton demonstrates how to make nose flutes

On Friday, February 21, between 1 p.m. and 4 pm., the public is invited to the Garden Visitor Center to join Greenwell Garden staff, taro experts Jerry Konanui and Keahi Tomas, and local school children in ku‘i kalo—poi pounding.  Boards and stones and cooked taro will be available for everyone from beginners to experts to try their hand at this traditional culinary art.  Also on Friday at 1 p.m., the Guided Hawaiian Plant Walk is a docent led tour of the Garden landscape of the plants of Hawai‘i in the 1600s.

The Grow Hawaiian festival takes place at the Garden on Saturday, February 22 from 9:00-2:30 pm.  Speakers will make presentations on taro cultivation, conservation, horticulture, and lauhala weaving, and artisans will demonstrate ipu gourd decorating, kapa making, weaving, woodworking, lei making, taro cultivation, and Hawaiian dyes.  There will be hands-on activities for the keiki and adults, plant and insect identification booths, displays, live entertainment, Hawaiian food, and much more!

Visitors can learn about the movement to provision Hawaiian voyaging canoes by using food grown in Hawai‘i so that the crews of the long distant canoes can eat healthy, sustainable, traditional foods as they travel across the Pacific and around the world.  There will also be a presentation on olonā cordage.  The bark of olonā has strong, durable fiber that was made into fishing line, nets, and other items for traditional life.

Some of the foremost experts in native plants and Hawaiian ethnobotany will lead tours of the Garden, and authors will be on hand to sign their books.  A silent auction will be held where visitors will have a chance to bid on poi boards, poi stones, and other traditional objects.

For more information call 323-3318, visit www.bishopmuseum.org/greenwell,  or email agg@bishopmuseum.org.  Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden is Bishop Museum’s native plant arboretum, located 12 miles south of Kailua-Kona on Highway 11, just south of mile marker 110.

The 10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival is, presented by Hawai‘i Forest and Trail.   Support for this event  is also provided by Kūki‘o,  and Kealakekua Ranch, Ltd.  An award from the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development and the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority funds the Guided Native Plant Walks.  Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or a modification of policies and procedures to participate in the Hawaiian Plant Walks should contact Peter Van Dyke at 808-323-3318 at least two weeks before their planned visit.

Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas Seeking Original Recipes

The Breadfruit Cooking Contest at Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas calls for original recipes that feature breadfruit as the main ingredient—a new twist this year also challenges cooks to combine breadfruit and banana into one unique dish.

The ‘Ulu Tart by Chef Ann Sutherland won Best of Show in the 2011 Breadfruit Cooking Contest. Photo Credit: Sonia R. Martinez

Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas will take place on Saturday, September 29th, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona. The festival is free and open to the public. In addition to celebrating the cultural and culinary aspects of breadfruit (‘ulu), this year’s festival will also highlight breadfruit’s forest companion—banana (mai‘a).

The public is invited to compete for prizes by entering the Breadfruit Cooking Contest with their own original recipes. Prizes will be awarded in the categories of: Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée (includes Soups or Salads served as a Main Dish), Dessert, Going Bananas (combining breadfruit & bananas in one dish), Youth (ages 12 to 18), Best of Show and Healthiest Choice. Each dish will be judged based on: best use of breadfruit, taste, appearance/presentation, originality and healthy ingredients. The Breadfruit Cooking Contest will be judged by a panel of local chefs and foodies—Edwin Goto owner of the “slow food” restaurant Village Burger; award winning private chef and “Conscious Hawaiian Cuisine” inventor Ōlelo pa‘a Ogawa; freelance food writer and former Honolulu Advertiser food editor Joan Namkoong; Chef Devin Lowder of Makali‘i Catering; food writer and cookbook author Sonia R. Martinez; and “Auntie Aloha”  Peneku Kihoi.

Winners of the two top prizes Best of Show and Healthiest Choice will each receive a $300 cash prize donated by Kamehameha Investment Corporation.  1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners in the categories of Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée, Dessert and Going Bananas will receive prizes donated by Sheraton Keauhou Bay Resort & Spa, Kamehameha Beach Hotel, Fair Winds Cruises, Roy’s, Huggo’s, Kona Brewing Company, Hawai‘i Volcano Sea Salt, Volcano Island Honey Company, Sunshine Nursery, Big Island Brewhaus, Greenwell Farms, Mauna Kea Tea, Coffee Shack, Big Island Bees, Ocean Sports, Kona Coffeehouse & Café and the Keauhou Shopping Center. Winners in the newly added Youth category are competing for a Body Glove Cruise for two and $125 in movie tickets.

The winners of the Breadfruit Cooking Contest will be announced at the festival at 12:00 pm by celebrity chef Sam Choy, who will be demonstrating some of his favorite ways to cook with ‘ulu from 10 am – 12 pm.  Other experts will demonstrate how to cook with breadfruit and banana and Chef Betty Saiki and the West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program will serve a locally sourced buffet luncheon featuring breadfruit.

Pre-registration for the Breadfruit Cooking Contest is encouraged, but not required. Rules, Instructions and Entry Forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.

Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas is presented by Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. The festival is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Doc Buyers Fund at Hawaii Community Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, Kamehameha Investment Corporation, Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program, Ke Ola Magazine, and Big Island Resource Conservation and Development.

 

Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas – Looking for Artists

Artists are invited to submit original 2D media artwork to the Breadfruit Fine Art Contest, a part of Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas being held at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 29, 2012 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm.

The Gift of Kū by Caren Loebel-Fried, winner of the 2011 Breadfruit Fine Art Contest.

The Breadfruit Fine Art Contest is part of the educational outreach associated with the festival, celebrating the beauty of the tree and fruit as well as the rich cultural heritage and future role of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i. Recognizing ‘ulu’s traditional role in mixed agroforestry, this year’s festival will also highlight ‘ulu’s Pacific-wide companion, mai’a (banana). Artwork can incorporate ‘ulu and mai‘a, but ‘ulu must be dominant in the piece.

Artists must register for the Breadfruit Fine Art Contest at www.breadfruit.info by September 14th in order to be able to submit work, which must be dropped off at the Donkey Mill Art Center September 18-21 from 10am to 4pm. Artwork that is not pre registered by September 14th will not be accepted. All artwork will be displayed at Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas on September 29th. One winning piece will be selected and the winner will receive a gift certificate for a stay at a local luxury resort.

Young artists are invited to enter a Youth Art Contest, but they must submit through a school or community group. For the Youth Art Contest— 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners in each age category will win cash prizes ($75, $50 and $25, respectively) donated by Kamehameha Investment Corporation and a gift bag donated by Starbucks Hawai‘i.  The top winner overall will receive a Dolphin Quest Dolphin Encounter for two.

The Breadfruit Fine Art and Youth Art Contest guidelines and submission forms can be found at breadfruit.info. Questions can be directed to Andrea Dean at 960-3727 or andrea@andreadean.com.

The Fine Art Contest is organized by: Donkey Mill Art Center, Hawaii Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas is presented by Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. The festival is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Doc Buyers Fund at Hawaii Community Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, Kamehameha Investment Corporation, Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program, Ke Ola Magazine, and Big Island Resource Conservation and Development.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info or calling (808) 756-9437.

 

Four Seasons and Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods Planting 500,000 Koa “Legacy” Trees

Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Ka‘upulehu, the first and only AAA Five-Diamond and Forbes Five-Star resort on Hawai‘i Island, has partnered with Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods in planting up to 500,000 “legacy” koa trees in the native Hawaiian forest. This initiative is part of global effort of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts to plant 10 million trees around the world, in recognition of the company’s 50th birthday.

Hawaii Legacy Hardwoods

These trees, to be planted over the next few years, will significantly contribute to the reforestation of this depleted species. As ‘legacy’ trees, they will not be harvested, and will live out their natural life in the forest. Located 34 miles north of Hilo above historic Umikoa Village, this 2,700 acre sustainable forest was once home to the koa forest of King Kamehameha I, marking a historic and sacred place on the Island.

“This important initiative shows our continued commitment to doing the right thing,” says Robert Whitfield, general manager of Four Seasons Resort Hualalai. “Our partnership will allow our employees, our guests and clients to be a part of this effort in bettering our environment and Island in particular, whether by planting one tree, or a forest of trees.”

Interested guests can visit the on-property learning kiosk, adjacent to the Resort’s cultural center, during their stay to meet with a representative of Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods, to learn the details of the program and plant their seedling into a small tray. Guests will receive a certificate with a unique code, allowing them to follow their tree via GPS signal, once it is planted in the forest.

Participation fee is $40 per tree, which goes toward the planting and care of their koa seedling through the partnership with Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods, who supports The Nature Conservancy with a $1 contribution per tree sponsorship to support global reforestation.

The Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i, as well as the Boy Scouts Aloha Council and various government agencies, are involved in this important and valuable environmental initiative. “Hawaii has lost over half of its native forests since human contact,” says John Henshaw, The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii. “This partnership between Four Seasons Resort Hualalai and Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods is a step in the right direction to return the Hawaiian Forest to its former abundance.”

For more information and reservations, please call (888) 340-5662 or visit www.fourseasons.com/hualalai.

The Hawaii Breadfruit Festival Coming Up Next Month

Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden are presenting the Breadfruit Festival

Breadfruit Festival

Dr. Diane Ragone of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden will be one of the expert speakers at the Breadfruit Festival. Photo credit: Jim Wiseman

Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. The Breadfruit Festival celebrates the rich culture of breadfruit (‘ulu) in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, raises awareness about the importance of breadfruit for food security and gives the people an opportunity to taste many delicious ways that breadfruit can be prepared. On the day of the Festival, the Garden will also be dedicating its new visitor center at 12:00 noon. The Festival and dedication are free and open to the public.

Breadfruit-inspired food will highlight the festivities. Chefs Olelo pa‘a Faith Ogawa of Glow Hawaii and Scott Lutey, Executive Chef of the Eddie Aikau Restaurant and Museum will be demonstrating how to make various delicious breadfruit dishes and giving out samples to taste. A local food buffet featuring breadfruit will be presented by Chef Betty Saiki and the West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program. Members of the public are invited to enter the Breadfruit Cooking Contest with their own favorite recipes. Open to all Hawai‘i Island residents, Cooking Contest prizes will be awarded in the categories of Appetizer, Soup/Salad/Side Dish, Main Dish/Entrée, Dessert, Best of Show and Healthiest Choice. Celebrity Chefs Mark Tsuchiyama of Hualalai Resort, Jacqueline Lau of Roy’s Restaurants, and Olelo pa‘a Faith Ogawa will be joined by food writer Sonia R. Martinez and KITV weekend anchor Pamela Young to judge the Cooking Contest.

Jerry Konanui pound breadfruit into "breadfruit poi"

Mahi‘ai and educator Jerry Konanui pounds ‘ulu poi at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. ‘Ulumaika, woodworking, quilting, tapa making, 'ulu poi and talks by Hawaiian cultural experts will be some of the cultural activities at the Breadfruit Festival. Photo credit: Craig Elevitch

The Breadfruit Festival will feature many Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultural activities, including: Mahi‘ai and educator Jerry Konanui will lead a hands-on workshop in the art of preparing ‘ulu poi. Hawaiian cultural expert Wesley Sen will be demonstrating how to make tapa from ‘ulu bark. ‘Ohana of the late Micronesian navigator Mau Piailug will share ‘ulu preparation techniques from their home island of Satawal. Master artisan Keoni Turalde will be carving a Hawaiian pahu (drum) from ‘ulu wood. Cultural experts Ryan McCormack of Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School and others will be giving talks on the culture, history and mythology of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i. Other cultural activities include ‘ulumaika, lei making, and quilting featuring ‘ulu motifs.

Workshops on breadfruit propagation, tree care and maintenance, economic opportunities and other topics will be given by experts Dr. Diane Ragone and Ian Cole of the Breadfruit Institute. An art exhibit will feature breadfruit-inspired works from the Festival fine art and youth art contests. ‘Ma‘afala’ (Samoan) and Hawaiian varieties of breadfruit trees will be available for sale.

Dr. Diane Ragone

Learning to cook breadfruit will be one of the Breadfruit Festival activities. Olelo Pa'a Faith Ogawa and other celebrity chefs will be demonstrating how to make gourmet dishes from breadfruit. The public can compete in the Breadfruit Cooking Contest to win prizes. Photo credit: Angela Tillson, Courtesy of the Breadfruit Institute

In the week leading up to the Breadfruit Festival, the Keauhou Resort will celebrate the “Taste of ‘Ulu” by featuring gourmet dishes in its resort restaurants and at the Keauhou Farmers Market.

The Breadfruit Festival is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program. Other sponsors include Kamehameha Schools, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Keauhou Resort, Ke Ola Magazine, Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program, Big Island Resource Conservation and Development, Glow Hawai‘i, Kona ‘Ulu, Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Growers, Sonia R. Martinez, ‘Āpono Hawai‘i and dozens of individual “Breadfruit—Traditional Roots and Modern Fruits” campaign supporters.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info.

The Breadfruit Festival is a program of Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu—Revitalizing Breadfruit, a project of Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden to revitalize ‘ulu as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food that addresses Hawai‘i’s food security issues.

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Breadfruit Festival and Art Contest Coming Up

Media Release:

Hawaii Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, are presenting the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. The Garden will also be holding a dedication for its new visitor center at 12:00 noon on the Festival day. The Festival and dedication are free and open to the public.

The Breadfruit Festival celebrates the rich culture of breadfruit (‘ulu) in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, raises awareness about the importance of breadfruit for food security and teaches about the many delicious ways to prepare breadfruit.

A highlight of the day will be cooking demonstrations by local celebrity chefs, food booths featuring breadfruit and other local favorites prepared by Hawai‘i Island’s finest chefs, and the “I Love Breadfruit” Cook-Off Contest where anyone may enter their favorite breadfruit dish to compete for prizes.

The Breadfruit Festival will also feature Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultural activities including ‘Ulumaika (breadfruit bowling), talks on the culture and history of breadfruit, ‘Ōlelo No‘eau, woodworking, quilting demonstrations, tapa making, ‘ulu poi making and more.

Workshops on breadfruit propagation, tree care and maintenance, economic opportunities, the Hunger Initiative and other topics will be given by experts Dr. Diane Ragone and Ian Cole of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

An art exhibit will feature the finalists in a fine art contest which focuses on the beauty of breadfruit, and a youth poster contest. Breadfruit trees will be available for sale on festival day, but supplies are limited and advance purchase for pick up at the festival is encouraged by contacting hooulu@hawaiihomegrown.net.

In addition to the September 24th Breadfruit Festival in South Kona, an East Side festival spearheaded by project partners Ho‘oulu Lahui and Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School will be held March 2-3, 2012.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info.

ART CONTEST CELEBRATES THE CULTURE AND BEAUTY OF BREADFRUIT

The Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu – Revitalizing Breadfruit in Hawai‘i Art Contest. The art contest is part of the educational outreach associated with the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu which will be held at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011. The contests celebrates the beauty of the breadfruit tree and fruit as well as the rich cultural heritage and future role of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

In a mauka region of Kona there was once a band of ‘ulu trees ½ mile wide and 18 miles long called kalū ‘ulu that produced as much as 36,000 tons of ‘ulu fruit per year. Today, few of these trees remain. Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project to revitalize ‘ulu (breadfruit) as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food which addresses Hawai‘i’s food security issues. The art contest will help raise awareness about the importance of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

All Hawai‘i Island artists are invited to submit original 2D media artwork to the art contest. Electronic submissions are due on July 25th for initial judging and semi-finalists will be asked to bring original work to the Donkey Mill Art Center on Thursday, August 11th for an artist’s reception and final judging. The artwork of finalists will be displayed at the Breadfruit Festival. One winning piece will be selected to be reproduced into a collectable poster commemorating the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project, which will be sold at the Breadfruit Festival and beyond as a fundraiser for the festival and project. Prizes will be awarded for best artwork.

Additional information and submission forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.

Avocado Festival Next Weekend

Media Release:

Marking its fifth anniversary, the Hawai‘i Avocado Festival celebrates five years of fun with a pre-event dinner Friday, Feb. 18 at the Keauhou Beach Resort. Open to the public, the dinner is the eve before the day-long festival and offers a unique avocado-themed menu, art show and auction. Tickets are $55.

The Hawai’i Avocado Festival is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19.  The free community, Zero Waste event is at the Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden on Hwy. 11 in Captain Cook and offers a wealth of activities for attendees of all ages.

“The dinner is a fundraiser so we can continue to keep the Hawai‘i Avocado Festival free,” says event founder Randyl Rupar. “The silent auction will also benefit the Kona Pacific Public Charter School.”

Dubbed, an Avocado-Inspired Deliciously Local Dinner, the menu was custom-created by Keauhou Beach Executive Chef Cy Yamamoto, a grad of Hawai‘i Community College-West Hawai‘i. Award-winning recipes from past Avocado Festivals will be included in the feast. Attendees will enjoy nine-different dishes, including gazpacho with avocado relish, seared ahi and avocado parfait, avocado and cherry couscous, Cajun mahimahi with avocado cream, crab and avocado macaroni and cheese plus avocado cheesecake.

The dinner is 5-9 p.m. and diners will be serenaded by live music. The art show will feature works created by past festival poster artists—Stephanie Bolton in 2009 and Shirley Pu Wills in 2010—plus 2011 artist Francene Hart.

Dinner tickets can be purchased starting February 1 at Divine Goods, the Kona Pacific Public Charter School and brownpaperticket.com.

The free Avocado Festival Saturday offers demonstrations on fruit tree grafting and growing, an avocado recipe contest, free guacamole sampling, farmer’s market, arts and crafts, a variety of healing arts, an eco fashion show and a full lineup of performing arts.

Also on tap will be a panel discussion titled “Bringing the Culture Back to Agriculture” with Dr. Ted Radovich, University of Hawai‘i; Ken Love, president of the statewide Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers Association; Colehour Bondera, Slow Food Hawaii delegate to Italy’s Terre Madre 2010; and Melanie Bondera of Kanalani Farm. Dessert master Hector Wong of Honolulu, who is known for his elaborate cakes, will wow foodies with a demonstration on making Hawaiian Avocado/Potato Pie while using 90 percent Hawaii-sourced ingredients.

Avocado/Potato Pie

Also on display will be original festival art by Francene Hart, “Golden Spiral Avocados.” The art will be sold on organic cotton T-shirts and Hart will be available to sign the official commemorative festival poster that will be available for purchase.

Last year’s all-day event attracted 3,000 attendees. For information, contact Randyl Rupar at 808-936-5233 or visit www.manakeasanctuary.org.

The 2011 Hawai‘i Avocado Festival is sponsored by Sanctuary of Mana Ke‘a Gardens, Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Growers-West Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Health Guide, ACF Kona Kohala Chefs Association, recyclehawaii.org, Zero Waste, Divine Goods, Island Naturals and Kona Business Center.

Greenwell Garden Grows Hawaiian at Annual Festival

Media Release:

Gardening, biology, and Hawaiian culture come together at the Seventh Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival presented by Hawai‘i Forest and Trail at the Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Captain Cook on Saturday, February 26, 2011, from 9:00 am to 2:30 pm. Hawaiian cultural practitioners, biologists, conservationists, and horticulturists celebrate their shared passion for the plants and insects of Hawai‘i at this annual festival. The event is free and everybody is invited.

The Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival has something for everyone at any age. There are presentations on botanical gardens, native ferns, storytelling sessions, and demonstrations of ipu gourd decorating, kapa making, lauhala weaving, woodworking, lei making, taro cultivation, and Hawaiian dyes. There will be hands-on activities for the keiki (children) and adults, plant and insect identification booths, displays, live entertainment, Hawaiian food, and much more.

The Seventh Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival is supported in part by a grant from the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority (HTA), in partnership with the County of Hawai‘i through the County Product Enrichment Program (CPEP). It is one of the HTA’s Festivals of Hawai‘i, celebrating diversity and aloha throughout Hawai‘i. Support for this program is also provided by K’ ki‘o, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and Hawai‘i Electric Light Company.

About the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden
Located in Captain Cook, 12 miles south of Kailua-Kona, the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden is part of the Bishop Museum, a private non-profit dedicated to inspiring people to experience and embrace the Pacific and its various cultures. The garden itself seeks to support the Hawaiian traditions of land and plant use, and conserve the plant resources of traditional cultural activities. The garden features more than 200 species of endemic, indigenous, and Polynesian introduced flora, as well as five acres of archeological remains of the ancient Hawaiian agricultural system, known as the Kona Field System. For more information please call (808) 323-3318 or visit http://www.bishopmuseum.org/exhibits/greenwell/greenwell.html .

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or a modification of policies/procedures to participate in the Grow Hawaiian Festival, should contact Peter Van Dyke at (808)323-3318 by February 21, 2011. This festival is funded under the Native Hawaiian Culture and Arts Program and an initiative under the Office of Innovation and Improvement of the US Department of Education. Education through Cultural & Historical Organizations (ECHO) provides educational enrichment to Native and non-Native children and lifelong learners.