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VIDEO, PHOTO UPDATE, PM: APRIL 1: Merrie Monarch Festival Hoʻolauleʻa

HAWAI'I ISLAND: 2018 Merrie Monarch Ho'olaule'a.More information here: http://bigislandnow.com/category/merrie-monarch/#BigIslandNow #MerrieMonarch

Posted by BigIslandNow.com on Sunday, April 1, 2018

HAWAI'I ISLAND: 2018 Merrie Monarch Ho'olaule'a.KSBE's Halau.More information here: http://bigislandnow.com/category/merrie-monarch/#BigIslandNow #MerrieMonarch

Posted by BigIslandNow.com on Sunday, April 1, 2018

Sunday, April 1, p.m.
Hoʻolauleʻa (celebration)
Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium
Free admission to watch performances by local hālau.

[slideshow]

TOMORROW, Monday, April 2

Merrie Monarch Free Mid-day Entertainment
Monday through Friday, April 2–6
Entertainment at the Grand Naniloa Hotel, noon
Entertainment at the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel, 1 p.m.

RELATED LINKS

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

2018 Merrie Monarch Festival Event Lineup
Merrie Monarch Festival 2018 Announces Judges
2018 Merrie Monarch Festival Participating Hālau
2018 Merrie Monarch Festival Announces Miss Aloha Hula Participants

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

Merrie Monarch Ho‘olaulea, April 1, 2018.

 

Senate Honors Hawaiian Language Leaders

The Hawai‘i Senate Majority announces that the Hawai‘i State Senate honored five Hawaiian language kumu for their leadership in reviving and teaching ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i in our schools statewide.  These ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i kumu are Dr. Larry Lindsey Kimura, Dr. Ku‘uipolani “Ipo” Kanahele Wong, Dr. Papaikanī‘au Kai‘anui, Kananinohea Kawai‘ae‘a Māka‘imoku and Lolena Nicholas.

Courtesy of Hawai‘i Senate Majority office.

Dr. Larry Lindsey Kimura is a pioneer of the ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i movement and he has worked tirelessly for its revitalization for almost 50 years. Dr. Kimura is an Associate Professor of Hawaiian language and Hawaiian Studies at Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College at UH Hilo.

Courtesy of Hawai‘i Senate Majority office.

Dr. Kimura founded the Ka Leo Hawai‘i Hawaiian language radio talk show in the 1970s and 80s, during which time he also co-founded ‘Aha Pūnana Leo and wrote curriculum for Papahana Kaiapuni Hawai‘i (the Hawaiian Immersion Program) in the public schools.  Here he developed the course material and trained teachers to teach their subjects in Hawaiian language statewide.  Dr. Kimura is also a well-known songwriter and ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i activist.

Dr. Ku‘uipolani “Ipo” Kanahele Wong is born and raised on Ni‘ihau and she was the mānaleo (native Hawaiian language speaker) resource kumu at the Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language at UH Mānoa.  She is the first person from Ni‘ihau to receive her doctorate degree in education and she currently serves as an Associate Professor at UH Mānoa and as the Director of Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language.

Lolena Nicholas is also a native speaker from Ni‘ihau.  She was a co-host for the radio talk show Ka Leo Hawai‘i, and she has also served as the mānaleo at Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language.  Known fondly as “Auty Lolena” to thousands of ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i students statewide, Kumu Nicholas is an icon in the Hawaiian language revitalization movement.  A film was produced in 2014 about her life’s work.

Courtesy of Hawai‘i Senate Majority office.

Dr. Papaikanī‘au Kai‘anui graduated with the first Hawaiian immersion class on Maui in 2001, and she is the first immersion student to complete a doctoral degree.  Today she is an instructor of Hawaiian at Maui College.

Kananinohea Kawai‘ae‘a Māka‘imoku is the first immersion graduate to return as a Hawaiian immersion teacher and she is now helping to prepare new immersion teachers across the state.  She also sits on the faculty of Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

Rock Opera Tells Story of Election Contest Between Kalākaua and Emma

Kamehameha Schools Hawaiʻi announces their upcoming hōʻike, Kū I Ka Mana, which will share the drama and political intrigue behind the election of 1874 between King David Kalākaua and Queen Emma Rooke, as the death of King William Charles Lunalilo left the Kingdom of Hawai‘i without an appointed successor to the throne.

Two shows are open to the public—Thursday and Friday, March 15 and 16, 2018, at 6 p.m. in Koaiʻa Gymnasium on the KS Hawaiʻi campus. Tickets are $5 and available for purchase online, at the door on the night of the performance, or at the high school office or Student Activities Center after school from 3 to 4 p.m. on school days.

Funds raised from hōʻike assist students with travel costs for participation in worldwide events, including performances at the 2019 Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Kū I Ka Mana dramatizes in music and dance the events leading up to the election of 1874 after the death of William Charles Lunalilo left the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi without an appointed successor to the throne.

In the running are Queen Emma, beloved by the people, and the charismatic David Kalākaua. In this telling, Bernice Pauahi Bishop also considers being part of the election, having second thoughts about having refused the crown when offered to her by Lot (Kamehameha V) before his death. The results of the election would have lasting repercussions on the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, setting the stage for many of the events that have shaped the history of the state.

Kū I Ka Mana will be presented as a rock opera in two acts with libretto by theater Kumu Eric Stack and music by Choir Director Herb Mahelona. The entire production is designed around a Steampunk theme in keeping with the genre of music. The production will be presented in English and Hawaiian.

Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i High School presents its hōʻike annually in the spring as an all-school event. All high school students participate in the production as actors, dancers, musicians or crew. This year, the production will also feature the KSH Elementary School Keiki Choir and the Mamalahoe Chapter of the Kamehameha Alumni Chorus.

All hōʻike productions focus on some aspect of Hawaiian history or culture presented to the public with the goal to educate our haumāna and to share with the community. It is a unique opportunity to celebrate Hawaiian culture, history and language and to instill pride and appreciation for things Hawaiian.

‘Hōkūleʻa’ Makes Historic First Sail into Pearl Harbor

For the first time in Hōkūleʻa’s 42-year history, the legendary canoe sailed into the waters of Pearl Harbor this morning, Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, and was welcomed by the Puʻuloa community, elected officials and the US Navy at Rainbow Bay Marina.

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

Entering the mouth of Pearl Harbor at approximately 8 a.m., the arrival began with a greeting, or rendering honors, between Hōkūleʻa and three Navy ships: the USS Hopper, USS Chafee, and the USS Chung Hoon. Sailors saluted from the decks of the three ships and blew a ceremonial whistle to honor the canoe’s arrival and Hōkūleʻa’s crew responded by blowing a pū (conch shell).

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

The sail into Pearl Harbor continued with Hōkūleʻa sailing and paying respects by blowing the pu and scattering plumeria flowers at cultural and historical sites throughout the harbor including Halealoha Halemau (Fort Kamehameha Reburial Platform), USS Nevada, Arizona Memorial, Battleship Missouri, Ford Island, USS Utah and Loko Paʻaiau Fishpond.

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

During the brief stop at Loko Paʻaiau Fishpond, a hoʻokupu of fresh fish was handed to a canoe paddler who delivered the special offering to the sacred side. Loko Paʻaiau fishpond is located at McGrew Point Navy housing and is one of only three fishponds out of an original 22 in the Pu’uloa area which are still relatively intact. In September 2014, the Navy invited members of the local Hawaiian civic clubs and ʻAiea community members to begin work on restoring the historic fishpond.

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

As Hōkūleʻa approached and docked at Rainbow Bay Marina, the crew was welcomed with traditional Hawaiian protocol including chants and a hula performance by ʻAiea High School. Welcome remarks were made by Rear Adm. Brian Fort, commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific; Representative Aaron Johanson; Councilmember Brandon Elefante; and Winston Lum of the Aliʻi Pauahi Hawaiian Civic Club.

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

Hōkūleʻa’s visit to Puʻuloa fills our hearts with profound gratitude and love,” said Winston Kalina Lum, Sr., Aliʻi Pauahi Hawaiian Civic Club board member and genealogical descendant of the early inhabitants of ʻAiea, Kalauao and Keʻehi. “It has been hundreds of years since a voyaging canoe last landed on our shores. As our community works together to preserve our cultural sites and educate our children, the canoe’s presence reminds us that we, too, can bring peace and Aloha to the planet,” he added.

“You honor us by sharing your insights and your wisdom gained during your Mālama Honua Voyage,” said commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific Rear Adm. Brian Fort. “I am a firm believer that the values that unite us are far greater than any distractions that divide us. We are truly inspired by the brave but humble navigators of Hōkūleʻa and the values you cherish and represent. If you ask any of our Navy sailors here about our Navy core values, he or she will tell you honor, courage and commitment. I know that you share these values.”

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

“The statements made here today are very important: what happens next week, what happens next year, what happens a decade from now,” said president of PVS Nainoa Thompson. “I hope this is another day that we take one step at a time towards coming together as a community, and working towards renewal together.”

Hōkūleʻa Courtesy Photo

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to be docked at Rainbow Bay Marina until Saturday, Feb. 17. The week-long engagement will include school visits, public dockside tours and a crew talk story event. As part of the Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail, the purpose of Hōkūleʻa’s visit is to bring the canoe to more of Hawaiʻi’s children, honor Pearl Harbor’s ancient culture and history, and to learn about the efforts to restore the area’s cultural sites including Loko Paʻaiau Fishpond. More than 1,000 school children are scheduled to visit Hōkūleʻa and participate in educational activities during her stop at Puʻuloa.

Native Hawaiian Law Center Names New Director

D. Kapuaala Sproat. Courtesy UH Manoa.

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa announces that Associate Professor D. Kapua‘ala Sproat has been named director of the Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Associate Faculty Specialist Susan K. Serrano will become associate director.

Sproat’s main areas of expertise focus on Native Hawaiian law, indigenous rights and natural resource protection and management. She is an authority on Hawai‘i water rights and has played a major role at the law school in the Environmental Law Program, as well as in Ka Huli Ao. In 2014 she received a Board of Regents’ Excellence in Teaching Award recognizing her exceptional teaching record and many contributions to UH and the community.

Sproat succeeds Ka Huli Ao founder Professor Melody MacKenzie, who will be working on an update to her 1,400-page treatise, Native Hawaiian Law: A Treatise, as well as several other projects along with teaching duties. The treatise, edited and written by MacKenzie in collaboration with Sproat and Serrano, took 15 years to complete and offers a comprehensive overview as well as historical background for Native Hawaiian law as it relates to U.S. and international law.

Susan K. Serrano. Courtesy UH Manoa

Sproat was born and raised on Kaua‘i’s North Shore in Kalihiwai, and is a member of the Akana and Sproat ʻohana on Kaua‘i and Kohala on Hawai‘i Island.

Serrano, in addition to teaching legal practice and Second Year Seminar, oversees several Ka Huli Ao projects, including its research and scholarship program; Post-JD Research Fellowship Program; and communications, including the center’s e-newsletter. Before joining the UH law school, Serrano was a special projects attorney at the Asian Law Caucus in San Francisco.

Applications Open for 2018-2019 Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship

The Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program (NHHSP), a program of Papa Ola Lōkahi (POL), is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications from students in health care and allied health professions for the 2018-2019 academic year. The deadline to apply online is March 18, 2018.

Awards are provided to students enrolled or enrolling full-time in an accredited college in Hawai‘i or the continental U.S. Benefits include tuition, other school related expenses, and a monthly stipend. Upon completion of the degree and required training and licensure, the recipient shall serve two to four years of full-time employment in designated medically underserved sites in Hawai‘i.

“Our applicants all demonstrate that they are exceptional college students,” asserts NHHSP director Keaulana Holt. “The ideal applicant will also understand the needs of their communities and be willing to apply their training and skills to improve the well-being back home.”

Applications are being accepted from students in clinical psychology, dentistry, dental hygiene, dietetics, marriage & family therapy, nursing, medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician’s assistant, public health and social work.

Last years recipients

Nine scholarships were awarded earlier this year. More than 275 scholarship awards have been made in almost 20 different health and behavioral health disciplines since 1991.

“The success of this grow-your-own program is that the scholars and alumni all contribute to improving the health of the lāhui.” POL executive director Dr. Sheri-Ann Daniels says proudly. “Even better, they are becoming the leaders in our lāhui. We’re nurturing Hawaiians to serve Hawaiians.”

The entire application process is online. For more information about the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program visit our website at www.nhhsp.org.

Kona Job Fair Set for Displaced Island Air Employees

Island Air photo.

In addition to the upcoming Nov. 18 Honolulu Open House for former Island Air employees announced last week, Hawaiian Airlines has confirmed additional job fairs in Kona, Kahului and Līhu‘e.

These sessions are reserved for displaced Island Air workers.

Kona (KOA) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Friday, Nov. 17, 2017
8:20 a.m.–12:40 p.m. (20-minute interviews)
KOA HA Offices – Check-in at HA ticket counter
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/kona

Līhu‘e (LIH) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017
8:20 a.m.–noon (20-minute interviews)
LIH State of Hawaii Mezzanine Conference Room
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/lihue

Kahului (OGG) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017
8:20 a.m.–2:40 p.m. (20-minute interviews)
OGG WP Offices – check in at the WP ticket counter
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/kahului

Name of Mauna Kea Changed to “Maunakea”

From the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy:

Why have we changed the spelling of Mauna Kea to Maunakea? While the name Mauna Kea (white mountain) is simply descriptive, “Maunakea” is a name that in Native Hawaiian tradition is short for “Mauna a Wākea,” the mountain of Wākea, one of the progenitors of the Hawaiian people. Maunakea is believed to connect the land to the heavens.

By Vadim Kurland – originally posted to Flickr as IMG_2673.JPG, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10580597

The UH Hilo School of Hawaiian Language recommends the one-word spelling, and recently the Office of Maunakea Management started using the one-word spelling (but their abbreviation remains OMKM). According to Stephanie Nagata, director of OMKM, the name Maunakea has been accepted by the official Hawai‘i Board on Geographic Names, and the federal government has also accepted the name change, so new maps will now use the one-word name.

Kamehameha Fall Musical: ‘Once On This Island’

The Kamehameha High School Hawaiʻi Island campus will hold it’s annual fall musical Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 16 through 18, 2017.

This year’s musical is Once On This Island, based on the novel My Love, My Love by Rosa Guy.

The musical portrays how a peasant girl from Haiti falls in love with a wealthy French boy from the other side of the island, but comes to the realization that love, just like life, can be complicated.

The shows will be held in William Charles Lunalilo Center and will begin at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $5 and will be available for purchase starting on Monday, Nov. 13, at the high school office from 3 to 4 p.m. or at the door right before each show.

The William Charles Lunalilo Center is located on the campus grounds located at 16-714 Volcano Road in Keaʻau.

For more information, call Eric Stack at (808) 982-0713.

Centennial Observance of Passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani

The public is invited to attend the centennial observance of the passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani on Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, at the Hawaiʻi State Capitol at 8 a.m.

Centennial Observance for Lili‘uokalani, Nov. 11

The public is invited to gather with Royal Orders and societies, cultural practitioners, kānaka, leaders of Ali‘i Trusts and dignitaries at the Queen’s promenade and statue on the grounds of the Hawai‘i State Capitol on Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. for Aloha Lili‘u, a centennial observance of the life and legacy of Queen Lili‘uokalani.

Over 100 churches across the state will toll their church bells at 8:30 a.m. in honor of the last reigning monarch in Hawai‘i, replicating the moment of her passing on November 11, 1917. In addition to the bells, there will be 100 conch shell blowers (pū), as well as hula dancers (‘ōlapa), drums (pahu), and chanters (mea oli) from across the islands to pay homage to the Queen.

The program that morning will include pieces written by Queen Lili‘uokalani, performed by Hawaiian musicians Marlene Sai, Manu Boyd, Owana Salazar and the Aloha Lili‘u Choir led by Nola Nahulu.

“A century after her passing, she is still beloved by her people, many of whom have benefitted from her legacy,” said State Senator Kai Kahele, co-organizer of Aloha Lili‘u. “We hope through this observance, we can all be reminded of and emulate her spirit and character of grace, courage, strength and compassion.”

“More than just marking a milestone in history, this event is intended to provide an historical admonition for us today to act with intention which benefits the greater good and encourages the best in all of us,” said Senator Brickwood Galuteria, Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Hawaiian Affairs and co-organizer of Aloha Lili‘u. “This also begins a year of discussion and reflection on how the Queen’s legacy continues to impact our lives today and how as a State, we can continue to improve the lives of the people of Hawai‘i.”

For more information on Aloha Lili‘u, please visit www.alohaliliu.org.

Governor Ige Celebrates Re-dedication of the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building

Gov. David Ige, cabinet members, state employees and representatives from the royal societies celebrated today the re-dedication of the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building on the 179th anniversary of the princess’ birth.

“I made it a priority to move our public servants back into this state-owned facility to improve efficiency, enhance collaboration and increase cost savings. I’m pleased that the state will see a lease cost savings of $2.2 million going forward” said Gov. Ige.

Employees of the departments of health and human services occupy the building. For the first time in decades, three of the four Department of Human Services’ division administrative offices are housed in one central location. Additionally, the attached agency, the Office of Youth Services (OYS) also moved to the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building.

“Having three of our four divisions and one attached agency in one building will help us achieve our collective department goals. I believe that our move into Kamāmalu building is a win-win – it brings the department closer as an ‘ohana so we can serve Hawai‘i more efficiently and effectively,” said DHS Director Pankaj Bhanot.

“I’m delighted to have our staff work in this historic building which is conveniently located near the Capitol, providing better access to the public, said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “Our Early Intervention Services, Disability and Communication Access Board, and State Council on Developmental Disabilities are excited to serve the public in their new location.”

Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building Facts

  • The total cost to rehab the building was $27,203,900.
  • Lease cost savings to the state are approximately $2.2 million per year.
  • The contractor was Ralph Inouye Co. Ltd.
  • The project began in March 2015 and was accepted by the state on Feb. 28, 2017.
  • The building has nine floors, and there are offices in the basement.
  • Three divisions of the department of human services occupy floors 2-7:
    • Social Services Administrative Offices for Child Welfare Services and Adult Protective and Community Services
    • Benefit, Employment and Support Services for SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program) and related aid to families, Child Care Program, and Homeless Program
    • Vocational Rehabilitation
    • Office of Youth Services (an attached agency)
  • The department of health occupies floors 8-9, and the Disability Communication Access Board is in the basement.

Hundreds Attend Annual Wayfinding Festival

Hundreds of people came out to ʻImiloa’s 10th Annual Wayfinding Festival held on Sunday, Oct. 29, at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai’i.

This year’s theme was “Bringing Home Lessons” of the Worldwide Voyage and featured a panel discussion with crewmembers from the recently completed Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, along with wa‘a (canoe) activities themed around Hawai‘i’s iconic double-hulled sailing canoe, Hōkūleʻa.

Tools used in Wayfinding made by Kona resident Gary Eoff.

“‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding Festival is our way of honoring our deep sea voyaging ancestors who sailed across the open ocean using the light of the stars to guide them to new lands,” said ‘Imiloa’s Executive Director Ka‘iu Kimura, “And at the same time it is a chance to celebrate our modern day navigators who are transmitting celestial navigation skills into the next generation.”

Attendees learned about the historic 3-year journey of Hōkūleʻa, which traveled 42,000 nautical miles, visiting 150 ports in more than 20 countries, while training a new generation of navigators, educators, scientists and community stewards.

Voyaging Canoe “Kiakahi” out of Keaukaha, Hawaiʻi Island.

This year, the festival also reprised the popular Waʻa Iron Chef Contest. In addition to keiki activities, special wayfinding planetarium programming were held in the theaters and planetarium. The public also had full free access to ʻImiloa’s interactive exhibit hall.

The 10th Annual Wayfinding Festival is sponsored by the Ama OluKai Foundation.

Hawaiian Immersion Schools Mural Project

A statewide campaign to commemorate a landmark anniversary for Hawaiian language education continued over the weekend by The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

Students helped design and create ten Living Legacy Murals, inspired by the mo‘olelo (story) of Kalapana.

“The Ke Kanakolu (The 30th) project was created by 808 Urban’s Living Legacy Series to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Ka Papahana Kaiapuni – the Hawaiian Immersion Schools in Hawaiʻi,” said Kamalani Johnson, lecturer, KHʻUOK and the project’s Hawaiian Language Director. “The project’s goal is to use art as a medium to invigorate Native Hawaiian identity and perpetuate Hawaiian values, language and culture, while raising awareness of the 23 Hawaiian Language Immersion and Charter schools that form Ka Papahana Kaiapuni.”

Led by graffiti artist John Prime Hina, ʻĀuna Pāheona, a group of art-centric individuals, have been traveling the state since August. The group is engaging local artists and Hawaiian Immersion schools to design and create the murals, which are being painted one-by-one, culminating on May 25, 2018 in Hanapēpē, Kauaʻi.

The story of Kalapana involves his mother, Halepākī from Kauaʻi and his father, Kānepōiki from Kona, who dies when he loses a hoʻopāpā (battle of wits) challenge from Kaua‘i chief, Kalanialiʻiloa. When he matures, Kalapana travels to Kaua‘i and avenges Kānepōiki’s death by winning his hoʻopāpā challenge through his knowledge of the winds, rains, plants, songs, and ʻai (tools) that are unknown to Kalanialiʻiloa.

“This mo‘olelo was selected for the tenacity and drive of the protagonist,” Johnson said. “The strife Kalapana experiences with the loss of Kānepōiki, that leads to avenging the will of his father is comparable to Hawaiian language revitalization efforts.”

ʻĀuna Pāheona worked with Ke Kula ʻo ʻEhunuikaimalino to complete the first mural in Keauhou, Kona. They are now nearing completion of the second painting in Nānākuli on Oʻahu, working with Ke Kula Kaiapuni o Nānākuli. The first two installments focus on Kalapana learning hoʻopāpā with his mother, Halepākī, and aunt, Kalaoa.

The Hilo mural, located at 51 Makaʻala Street, will depict Kalapana unofficially putting his hoʻopāpā skills into play after completing his schooling with Kalaoa, then going to Kauaʻi where he encounters a local of the area.

Painting participants will include teachers, students and ʻohana from Ka ʻUmeke Kāʻeo, along with Hawaiian language students from KHʻUOK and the Hawaiian medium laboratory school Ke Kula ʻo Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu.

The Ka Papahana Kaiapuni celebration coincides with the 20th anniversary of KHʻUOK. Director Keiki Kawaiʻaeʻa says the murals commemorate the progress and revitalization efforts of the Hawaiian language through its Hawaiian medium-immersion educational pathway as Hawaiʻi prepares to mark next year’s 40th anniversary of ʻōlelo (language) Hawaiʻi as a state official language.

“KHʻUOK continues to support the renormalization of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi through various initiatives, including new Hawaiian lexicon, an on-line dictionary at wehewehe.org and Hawaiian medium curriculum for grades K-12 supported by the college’s Hale Kuamoʻo Hawaiian Language Center. Additional contributions include the preparation of Hawaiian medium-immersion teachers through the Kahuawaiola Indigenous Teacher Education program and Hawaiian medium laboratory schools such as Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu in Keaʻau,” Kawaiʻaeʻa said. “Through strong collaboration of P-12 and tertiary education working together with schools, families, government and community, Hawaiian language is showing a shift towards recovery of this precious cultural resource.”

Hawai‘i Ranks Third in Nation in U.S. News’ Best States for Aging Ranking

The State of Hawai‘i ranks third in the country when it comes to states that are best at serving their older population. U.S. News and World Report based its rankings on the cost of care, nursing home quality, primary care and life expectancy.The publication says that Hawai‘i’s residents have the longest life expectancy in the U.S., with its 65-and-older population expected to live 20 years longer than in other states. U.S. News has also found that Hawai‘i has the best nursing home quality in the country.

“It’s part of our culture in Hawai‘i to respect and honor our kupuna or elders. Our programs reflect these values and aim to keep our older population active and contributing members of society,” said Gov. David Ige.

Colorado ranked first, with one of the healthiest and most physically active older populations in the country. Maine is second, where a fifth of the population consists of residents 65 and older, a higher percentage than in any other state.

Rounding out the top 10 are: Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Vermont, New Hampshire and Florida.

In 2016, Americans 65 and older accounted for 15.2 percent of the total population, an increase of 2.8 percent from 2000. Not only are baby boomers aging, but advances in medicine and technology are resulting in a longer life expectancy.

The U.S. Census Bureau predicts that one in five Americans will be 65 years and older by 2030.

Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association Anniversary Celebration Set For Oct. 28-29

Since 1997, the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) has worked to promote Hawaiian culture, values and traditions in the visitor industry and beyond through consultation and workforce education, and to provide opportunities for the Hawaiian community to shape the future of tourism. Now in its 20th year, join NaHHA in celebrating two decades of service to Hawai‘i with two events in Waikīkī, October 28 and 29.

On Saturday, October 28 from 5 – 9 p.m., the community is invited to a free ‘Aha Mele: an evening of Hawaiian music at the Royal Hawaiian Center’s Royal Grove in the heart of Waikīkī. Presented by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority in partnership with Hawaiian 105 KINE and NaHHA, this event will feature the Sons of Waikīkī, Hālau ‘O Kaululaua‘e, The Pandanus Club featuring Waikīkī legends Danny Kaleikini and Marlene Sai, and Amy Hānaiali‘i.

On the evening of Sunday, October 29, NaHHA celebrates two decades of service with an Anniversary Gala at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. The gala will feature cuisine from the chefs at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a silent auction, mo‘olelo (stories) from people involved with NaHHA and the visitor industry over the years, and a performance by Amy Hānaiali‘i sure to wow the crowd.

The gala will celebrate the vision and contributions of NaHHA’s founders, the late George Kanahele, Ph.D, and the late Senator Kenneth Brown. NaHHA will also honor the memebrs of its founding Board of Directors: Muriel Anderson, Peter Apo, Cy Bridges, Doug Chang, John DeFries, Albert Kanahele, Noelani Mahoe, Jace McQuivey, and Lori Sablas.

“This celebration will honor the rich history of the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association and the many hands who have ensured our success in the years to come. We hope you can join us in celebrating the contributions and vision of our founders, and the mission we work toward every day,” said Pohai Ryan, Executive Director of NaHHA.

Individual seats and tables are available for the gala. To reserve your seat at the gala, visit nahha20gala.eventbrite.com or call NaHHA at (808) 628-6374. Individual seats and tables are available.

About the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA)

In designating 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, the United Nations General Assembly noted “the importance of international tourism in fostering better understanding among peoples everywhere, in leading to a greater awareness of the rich heritage of various civilizations, thereby contributing to the strengthening of peace in the world.” Twenty years ago, George Hu‘eu Sanford Kanahele, Ph.D. and Senator Kenneth Francis Kamu‘ookalani Brown had reached similar conclusions as those being expressed today by the United Nations.

Inspired by a shared vision of Hawai‘i where Hawaiian culture and the visitor industry can strengthen and enrich one another, Kanahele and Brown co-founded the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association to shape the future of Hawai‘i tourism by utilizing Hawaiian cultural values as the foundation for business development and leadership. Intuitively, they knew that Hawai‘i’s rare gift to the world is the Aloha Spirit and by sharing this gift, the world would become a better place and the spiritual essence of Hawai‘i’s people would be recognized and respected globally.

Today, NaHHA fulfills the vision of its founders by delivering Hawaiian cultural training and consultation to the visitor industry workforce, as well as businesses and organizations that support the visitor industry. Learn more about NaHHA’s offerings at NaHHA.com.

Hawaiian Monk Seal “Kaimana” to go up for “Adoption,” Benefit to Support Marine Mammal Response and Rescue in Hawai‘i

For weeks, thousands flocked to Kaimana beach to get a glimpse of the Hawaiian monk seal “Rocky” and her new pup, “Kaimana.” The new pup, the first born in Waikīkī in decades, captured the hearts of millions across Hawai‘i and the world. Now, some lucky individual will have the opportunity to “adopt” the pup at an upcoming fundraiser for marine mammal conservation.

Photo by Jason O’Rourke

Kaimana and three other monk seal pups born this year will be up for “adoption” at the event. The “adoption” includes a large individual framed photo of the pup, a certificate of “adoption,” and an opportunity to visit your “adopted” pup with a monk seal volunteer team (conditions apply).

All of this and more will be part of an event Dolphin Quest Oahu and The Kahala Hotel & Resort are hosting to raise funds for Hawai’i Marine Animal Response and their extraordinary network of volunteers who help to preserve Hawaii’s protected marine species. The event takes place on Friday, October 20, 2017 at The Kahala Hotel & Resort (5000 Kahala Ave, Honolulu, HI) from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

The event will feature live Hawaiian music from five-time Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award winners Waipuna, delectable food and drinks from The Kahala, and a silent auction featuring local fashion and art.

Individual tickets are available for $125.00 and can be purchased at bit.ly/alohaformonkseals

Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response (HMAR) is Hawaii’s largest non-profit marine species conservation and response organization. HMAR covers approximately 300 miles of coastline on the islands of Oʻahu and Molokaʻi with a support staff of volunteers, interns and employees. Members of this staff are deployed to the field in response to sightings and to perform surveys, outreach activity, and interventions nearly 9 times per day, on average. Their past annual activity includes over 2,400 protected marine species sightings, over 2,700 occasions of team members engaged in shoreline responses and surveys, and over 50 Hawaiian monk seal and sea turtle related escalations or emergency responses.

Proceeds from the event will go to much needed supplies and equipment for the organization. “We are a small organization with some mighty big responsibilities on our hands, but we have a team of passionate volunteers and staff who dedicate thousands of hours of their time caring for the animals they love. This event is both an opportunity to thank them and to raise money for our nonprofit,” explains Jon Gelman, founder of HMAR.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS:

E Ho‘onui i ke Aloha no ke Kai Ola (To increase our aloha for the living sea) is a benefit for Hawai‘i Marine Animal Response (HMAR) and their network of staff and volunteers who help to preserve Hawaii’s protected marine species every day. This public event will be held at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, and it is sponsored by Dolphin Quest Oahu.

The anticipated high point of the benefit will be the auction, which will feature art, photos, and crafts from throughout Hawai‘i. Also up for auction will be the symbolic “adoption” of each of the four Hawaiian monk seal pups born on Oahu this year, including Wailea, the monk seal born off Ka‘ōhao (Lanikai) and Kaimana, the now-famed pup born in Waikīkī. The symbolic “Adoption” will include:

• A large framed photo of the seal
• A certificate of adoption
• A unique opportunity to visit the seal with the volunteer network (conditions apply)

HMAR also conducts public outreach and education for schools, the public and Hawai’i organizations. Earlier this year, Dolphin Quest was recognized by HMAR as a Hawaii Marine Animal Steward in partnership with Hawai’i Tourism Authority.

Dolphin Quest provides ongoing support and hands-on training for Hawai’i’s stranding network volunteers. In May of this year, Dolphin Quest hosted veterinarians from multiple Hawaiian islands providing valuable experience with healthy dolphins to aid their wild stranding response efforts.

Tickets to the event are available for purchase online for $125 per person as well as premium sponsorship packages for $1000. Availability is limited and the organizers are urging the public to secure tickets as soon as possible to attend this evening of music, food, festivities and marine animal conservation.

Tickets include a gift, heavy gourmet pūpū, and signature non-alcoholic drinks. $1000 Sponsorships include five tickets to the event and promotion of a business or organization in the program and leading up to the event.

Hawaii Tourism Authority Awarding $3.5 Million to Support 124 Hawaiian Culture, Natural Resources and Community Programs in 2018

In keeping with its commitment to foster sustainable tourism in the Hawaiian Islands, the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) is providing funding of more than $3.5 million to 124 programs that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture, protecting natural resources and showcasing community events in 2018.Recipients of the funding are nonprofit groups, community organizations and individuals statewide who have demonstrated through proposals submitted to HTA their dedication to strengthen the enduring qualities of Hawaii’s legacy that distinguish the islands as a place to live and visit.

“Sustainable tourism starts at the community level and that’s the focus of our support for initiatives by groups and individuals who have pledged to make Hawaii a better place for future generations,” said George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO. “Collectively, these community-based programs will help manage tourism’s impacts by preserving the quality of life we treasure as residents through culture, the environment and the sharing of festivals and events ingrained in the traditions of Hawaii’s people.”

Funding is being provided to recipients on all islands for usage in 2018 as part of three HTA program categories: Kukulu Ola, Aloha Aina and Community Enrichment. HTA issued a request for proposals on June 21 with submittals from qualified applicants received by August 4.

  • A total of $1,240,000 is being awarded to 33 recipients that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture through HTA’s Kukulu Ola program. Awardees include community groups, practitioners, craftsmen, musicians and artists committed to strengthening a broader understanding and appreciation of Hawaiian culture through place-based activity engagement. Founded on the value of ma ka hana ka ike (in working one learns), the Kukulu Ola program assists recipients steeped in ike Hawaii to share within communities the Hawaiian values inherent in each respective practice.
  • A total of $1,150,000 is being awarded to 26 recipients that are helping to protect Hawaii’s natural resources through HTA’s Aloha Aina program. Focused on the lasting value of stewardship by responsible community-based entities that emphasize aina-kanaka relationships and knowledge, the Aloha Aina program supports efforts to manage, conserve and revitalize Hawaii’s natural resources and environment.
  • A total of $1,153,300 is being awarded to 65 recipients through HTA’s Community Enrichment program, which supports quality experiences created by communities to be shared with residents and visitors for their enjoyment. The Community Enrichment program invests in a diverse array of festivals, events and year-round programs in support of culture, education, health and wellness, nature, agriculture, sports, technology and voluntourism.

Click here for the listing of awardees receiving funding from HTA.

Open Access for Broken Trust Book

Thanks to support from University of Hawaii Press and Kamehameha Schools, the public now has free access to the bestselling book Broken Trust: Greed, Mismanagement & Political Manipulation at America’s Largest Charitable Trust.

Broken Trust chronicles scandal at Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate during the late 1990s, which involved all three branches of Hawaii’s government and attracted front-page coverage in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. CBS’s 60 Minutes called it, “the biggest story in Hawaii since Pearl Harbor.”

Local and national publications praised Broken Trust; Hawaii Book Publishers Association named it Book of the Year; and numerous high schools, colleges, and law schools have used Broken Trust in courses such as Modern Hawaiian History, Participation in Democracy, Trusts & Estates, Nonprofit Organizations, Federal Taxation, Fiduciary Administration, and Professional Responsibility.

The book’s surviving co-author, Randall Roth, explains in the open-access introduction that he and Judge Samuel P. King wrote Broken Trust to help protect the legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. They assigned all royalties to local charities and donated thousands of copies to libraries and high schools. Source documents, legal issues, discussion questions, and lesson plans are available at www.BrokenTrustBook.com.

Roth added: “Judge King, would be delighted, as am I, that the current Kamehameha Schools trustees are supporting this open-access edition of Broken Trust.”

In Broken Trust’s open-access introduction, the Kamehameha Schools trustees express a desire to recognize and honor members of the Kamehameha Schools ohana who courageously stood up for the trust during the years of controversy. They also express pleasure that Broken Trust will be “openly available to students, today and in the future, so that the lessons learned might continue to make us healthier as an organization and as a community.”

The open-access introduction also includes this quote from the late Winona Beamer: “In Hawai‘i, we tend not to speak up, even when we know that something is wrong. Especially in the Hawaiian community, the common practice has long been to avoid confrontation at almost any cost. This approach does not serve us well in today’s world. We must learn to be good stewards of all that we have been given, and this sometimes requires that we take a stand. The way the Kamehameha ‘ohana rallied and worked together as a family to defend Princess Pauahi’s legacy says much about how to live effectively and righteously in a fast-changing world. It demonstrates the power of informed people unified by moral conviction, and should always be a source of pride and inspiration.”

Links to Broken Trust on popular platforms, and to download:

Amazon/Kindle: http://a.co/0tFjGaH
GooglePlay and GoogleBooks: https://books.google.com/books?id=z6Y2DwAAQBAJ
ScholarSpace PDF files: https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/48548

“What makes Broken Trust so fascinating is that it works on multiple levels. It’s a well-researched book about Hawaii’s history and culture; a dramatic story of judicial, political, and corporate corruption; and a cautionary tale for acting or future charitable trust board members on everything you shouldn’t do if you want to respect your organization’s mission and ensure the public’s trust. The players in Broken Trust jump off the page.” —Christopher Quay, Exempt Organization Tax Review

“Broken Trust is rich in anthropological detail and spiced with characters and quotations that would comfortably populate a John Grisham novel. The authors are fearless and uncomplimentary when documenting the role and ethical quandaries of lawyers and judges.” —James Daw, Estates, Trusts & Pensions Journal

“Broken Trust reads like a political thriller with a whole assortment of characters straight out of a Tom Clancy novel and plot twists that are always unexpected. It was hard to put down. A great read!” —W. Scott Simon, author of The Prudent Investor

“I loved this book! It was like reading a thriller; I could not wait to find out what would happen next. Who would have thought that a book about a charitable trust could be so exciting? Some of the characters are truly unforgettable. I am still shaking my head at the fiduciary breaches and the conflicts of interest.”
—Professor Mary LaFrance, University of Nevada School of Law

Governor Ige’s Statement on Approval of TMT Permit

The Board’s decision today is the latest milestone in what has been a complex journey. I believe Hawai‘i can host a new telescope in the right way, with respect for the values, traditions and culture of the first Hawaiians, and that our island state can be Earth’s eyes into the universe to prepare for a brighter future.
— Governor David Ige