Oahu Residents to Disembark Cruise Ship at Honolulu Harbor

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) Harbors Division notifies the public the Pacific Princess cruise ship is scheduled to arrive at Honolulu Harbor on April 13, 2020. The ship was last at port in Melbourne, Australia on March 28; however, no passengers or crew disembarked. It does not have any confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 associated with the vessel. When the ship arrives in Honolulu it will have been at sea longer than the 14 day incubation period. Ship leadership is required to report any health concerns prior to entering Honolulu Harbor.

Pacific Princess

The Pacific Princess does not have enough fuel to reach its final destination in California. It will refuel and take on provisions before it is tentatively scheduled to depart on the same day it arrives.

Four Oahu residents (two couples) on the ship will be allowed to disembark in Honolulu. They will be medically vetted on the ship prior to disembarkation. They will also be subject to medical and temperature screening by AMR paramedics upon leaving the ship. They will be shuttled directly from the harbor to their homes where they will immediately begin their mandatory 14 day quarantine inside their residences.

The remaining 111 passengers and all crewmembers will not be allowed to leave the ship while in Hawaii by order of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HIEMA) Director.

Seabourn Sojourn 

The Seabourn Sojourn is scheduled to arrive at Honolulu Harbor on April 18, 2020. The ship was last at port for fuel and provisions in Melbourne, Australia on March 29. No one left the vessel while at port. There are no confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 associated with the vessel. Even though there are no passengers onboard and no one will be allowed to leave the ship in Hawaii, the captain is required to report health concerns prior to entering Honolulu Harbor.

 Seabourn Sojourn

The Seabourn Sojourn ship is tentatively scheduled to depart Honolulu for California the same day it arrives.

By order of the State of Hawaii proclamation and by order of the Director of HIEMA all passenger cruise ship reservations to Hawaii have been canceled through April 30. Exceptions are considered on a case by case basis.

Hawaiian Airlines March & First Quarter Traffic Statistics Reflect Effects of COVID-19

Hawaiian Airlines saw sharp declines in its system-wide traffic statistics in March 2020 as government mandated restrictions on travel in response to the COVID-19 pandemic became more numerous.

Demand declines that began with U.S. government restrictions on Chinese arrivals in late January accelerated in mid-March, when governments in Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, American Samoa and Hawai’i instituted requirements of self-isolation or quarantine for incoming arrivals. Hawaiian Airlines has responded to the diminishing demand by reducing its scheduled service systemwide by 95% through April 2020.

The table below summarizes March and year-to-date statistics compared to the respective prior-year periods. In light of Hawaiian’s substantially reduced schedule in April and likelihood of similar reductions in May, Hawaiian emphasized that the results shown below should not be construed as indicative of future results.

1Includes the operations of contract carriers under capacity purchase agreements.

PAX – Passengers transported

RPMs – Revenue Passenger Mile; one paying passenger transported one mile

ASMs – Available Seat Mile; one seat transported one mile

LF – Load Factor; percentage of seating capacity filled

Hawaii Passenger Arrivals by Air

Yesterday, 513 people arrived in Hawaii including 133 visitors and 182 residents. In comparison, during this same time last year, nearly 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

The state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine started on March 26th for all passengers arriving in Hawaii from out of state. The order was expanded on April 1st to include interisland travelers.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state yesterday and does not include interisland travel.

Hawaii Air Passenger Arrivals by Air

Yesterday, 583 people arrived in Hawaii including 126 visitors and 233 residents. In comparison, during this same time last year, nearly 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

The state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine started on March 26th for all passengers arriving in Hawaii from out of state. The order was expanded on April 1st to include interisland travelers.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state yesterday and does not include interisland travel.

Passenger Arrivals by Air Continues to Drop

The number of passengers arriving in Hawaii by air continues to drop.

Yesterday, 543 people arrived in Hawaii, and of that amount, 89 were visitors. Most of the passengers were returning residents. In comparison, during this same time last year, nearly 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

The state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine started last week Thursday, March 26th, for all passengers arriving in Hawaii from out of state. The order was expanded on April 1st to include interisland travelers.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state yesterday and does not include interisland travel.

Passenger Arrivals Continue to Dwindle

Today marks one week since the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine started for all passengers arriving in Hawaii from out of state.

The order was expanded yesterday to include interisland travelers as well.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state yesterday and does not include interisland travel.

Yesterday, 664 people arrived in Hawaii, and of that number, 120 people were visitors. Most of the passengers were returning residents.

In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

First Hawaii COVID-19 Death Possibly Travel-Related, Minor Tests Positive

The first death from COVID-19 has been confirmed as an older adult O‘ahu resident who had recently traveled from Las Vegas. DOH reports 34 new COVID-19 cases today — one is a minor and 33 are adults. The majority of cases are residents (26), one (1) is a visitor and seven (7) are unknown and pending investigation. There are now a total of 258 presumptive or confirmed cases in the state.

Community Surveillance testing has conducted roughly 380 tests to date on representative samples from every island with one (1) positive result on O‘ahu, reinforcing there is limited and localized community spread on O‘ahu.

Today, President Trump granted a Major Disaster Declaration for the State of Hawai‘i triggering the release of Federal funds to help communities recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. The declaration is in effect from Jan. 20, 2020 and is continuing. 

The disaster declaration provides assistance to individuals and households and for emergency work and repair or replacement of disaster-damaged facilities. The measure provides direct federal assistance of 75% of the total cost.

Hawaii Arrivals By Air Down to 906

Today is the first day of the state’s expanded 14-day mandatory self-quarantine, which now includes interisland travelers.

Up until yesterday, March 31st, that order only applied to those arriving from out of state.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state yesterday and does not include interisland travel.


Yesterday was the sixth day since the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine started.

Yesterday, 906 people arrived in Hawaii, and of that number, 161 people were visitors. Most of the passengers were either returning residents or crew members.

In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

Letter to Trump: Stop Non-Essential Travel to Hawaii

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell is asking other Hawaii county mayors as well as Governor Ige to sign a letter to President Trump asking to stop all non-essential travel into Hawaii until the end of April.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority reports that the number of passengers flying into Hawaii continues to drop.

Yesterday, 681 people arrived in Hawaii on the fifth day of the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine for all incoming passengers. Of that number, 121 people were visitors.

Most of the passengers were either returning residents or crew members. In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air from out of state on March 30th.

Hawaii Visitor Statistics Released for February 2020

In February 2020, flight cancellations to the Hawaiian Islands began due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. The China market had the greatest impact during February with direct air service suspended on February 3 due to a travel ban on Chinese citizens to the U.S. However, overall visitor spending was up.

Total spending by visitors in the Hawaiian Islands increased to $1.46 billion (+4.6%) in February 2020, according to preliminary statistics released today by the Hawaii Tourism Authority. This represented an average of $50.3 million per day, an increase of 1.0 percent compared to February 2019. The average daily census1 showed 250,052 total visitors in Hawaii on any given day in February, which was slightly higher (+0.5%) compared to a year ago. Most visitors arrived by air service (+0.4%, 247,493 visitors per day) and some traveled by cruise ships (+9.3%, 2,558 visitors per day).

For visitors arriving by air, U.S. West spending (+9.7% to $19.8 million per day) and the average daily census (+7.7% to 105,233 visitors per day) increased in February, compared to a year ago. U.S. East visitor spending (+8.6% to $14.4 million per day) and the average daily census (+4.3% to 65,827 visitors per day) also rose in February year-over-year.

Japan visitor spending (-2.9% to $5.7 million per day) and the average daily census declined (-4.1% to 23,395 visitors per day) in February, versus a year ago. Canada visitor spending (-7.3% to $5.0 million per day) and the average daily census (-7.0% to 27,223 visitors per day) also declined. Combined spending by visitors from All Other markets (-26.2% to $5.3 million per day) and the average daily census (-19.3% to 25,815 visitors per day) decreased as well.

Total air seats to the Hawaiian Islands increased in February (+9.5% to 1,107,405), with the daily average also up (+5.8% to 38,186 seats per day) compared to a year ago. Growth in average daily scheduled air seats from U.S. East (+18.9% 3,739 seats per day) and U.S. West (+11.4%, 23,536 seats per day) offset decreases from Other Asia (-30.1% to 1,095 seats per day), Oceania (-13.3% to 1,070 seats per day), Canada (-9.3% to 2,126 seats per day) and Japan (-1.2% to 5,581 seats per day).

Other Highlights:

U.S. West: In February, visitor arrivals from the Pacific and Mountain regions increased, with the mix of visitors (Pacific region 79.9%, and Mountain region 20.1% of total U.S. West) similar to a year ago.
Through the first two months of 2020, visitor arrivals grew from both the Pacific and Mountain regions. Year-to-date, per person per day visitor spending increased to $187 (+2.6%). Lodging, shopping, and food and beverage expenses were higher, while transportation, and entertainment and recreation expenses were about the same compared to the first two months of 2019.

U.S. East: All U.S. East regions in February showed growth in visitor arrivals compared to a year ago. The mix of visitors was also consistent with February 2019. The two largest regions continued to be East North Central (23.9% of U.S. East) and South Atlantic (19% of U.S. East).
Through the first two months of 2020, every region recorded increased visitor arrivals. Per person per day visitor spending of $223 was up (+3.7%) compared to a year ago. Lodging and transportation expenses increased, while shopping, and food and beverage expenses were slightly lower. Entertainment and recreation expenses were similar to a year ago.

Japan: For the first two months of 2020, per person per day visitor spending was up slightly (+1.0% to $241) compared to a year ago. Lodging, food and beverage, transportation, and entertainment and recreation expenses increased, while spending on shopping declined.

Canada: For the first two months of 2020, per person per day visitor spending rose to $179 (+1.1%). Food and beverage, entertainment and recreation, and shopping expenses increased, while lodging and transportation expenses were similar to a year ago.

Number of Passengers Flying Into Hawaii Continues to Tank

The number of passengers flying into Hawaii continues to drop.

Yesterday, 826 people arrived in Hawaii on the fourth day of the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine for all incoming passengers. Of that number, 167 people were visitors. Most of the passengers were either returning residents or crew members.

In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air on March 29th. 

Passengers Flying Into Hawaii Continues to Drop

The number of passengers flying into Hawaii continues to drop.

Yesterday, 1,207 people arrived in Hawaii on the third day of the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine for all incoming passengers. Of that number, 151 people were visitors, and most of the passengers were either returning residents or crew members.

In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

This table shows the number of people who arrived by air on March 28th. 

Passenger Arrivals By Air Continues to Drop

The number of passengers flying into Hawaii continues to drop.

Yesterday, 1,221 people arrived in Hawaii on the second day of the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine for all incoming passengers. Of that number, 180 people were visitors, and most of the passengers were either returning residents or crew members. In comparison, during this same time last year, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

This table details the number of people who arrived by air on March 27th.

Passenger Arrivals By Air Tank On First Day of Quarantine

On Thursday, March 26, 2020, 1,589 passengers arrived in Hawaii on the first day of the state’s 14-day mandatory self-quarantine for all incoming passengers.

Of that number, 268 people were visitors, and most of them were either crew members or returning residents.

In comparison, last year at the end of March, more than 30,000 passengers arrived in Hawaii daily, including residents and visitors.

This table details the number of people who arrived by air on March 26th:

* HNL (Honolulu, Oahu), OGG (Kahului, Maui), KOA (Kona, Hawaii Island), LIH (Lihue, Kauai)

Hawaii Passenger Arrivals By Air Tanks

The number of people – both residents and visitors – arriving in Hawaii daily by air has significantly dropped over the past week.

Last week Tuesday, March 17th, Governor David Ige strongly encouraged our visitors to postpone their vacations for at least the next 30 days to help with the State’s efforts to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

Governor Ige followed up with an order for a 14-day mandatory quarantine for all incoming passengers to Hawaii and a stay at home order.

The Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism publishes a daily passenger count during the weekdays: http://dbedt.hawaii.gov/visitor/daily-passenger-counts/

Below you will find the amount of people – both residents and visitors – who arrived by air, broken down by island. This includes passengers from the U.S. mainland and international locations, but not interisland travel. *We have included the drop in percentage compared to the same time a year ago.

Click to enlarge

Note: The daily average amount of residents arriving during March 2019 was 4,268. Also, the passenger count does not include flights from Canada.

HVNP Closed to Visitors Until Further Notice

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, in response to the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) and actions outlined by the Governor of the State of Hawai‘i, is announcing additional modifications to operations to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

As of Sunday, March 22, 2020, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will close to all park visitors until further notice. The park will offer no services except those that support visitor or resource protection. 

At Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the following services and operations will be suspended on Sunday, March 22, 2020 in order to comply with the State of Hawai‘i action until further notice: 

  • All public areas, including trails, roads, campgrounds, the backcountry, and public restrooms are closed to visitors. 
  • All commercial tours and special use permits are suspended. 
  • The Kahuku Unit is closed. 

The health and safety of our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is our number one priority. The National Park Service (NPS) is working with federal, state, and local authorities to closely monitor COVID-19. We will notify the public when we resume full operations and provide updates on our website, www.nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes, and social media channels.  
The NPS encourages people to take advantage of the many digital tools already available to explore Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, including our social media channels, Facebook,Instagram and Twitter, and U.S. Geological Survey webcams: https://www.nps.gov/havo/learn/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.
In addition, our education team has created curriculum resources for families at home with children in kindergarten through high school that highlight the geology, biology and Hawaiian culture that define the park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/learn/education/curriculummaterials.htm.
Updates about NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus

Hawaiian Consolidating Check-in Operations at HNL

Hawaiian Airlines is temporarily centralizing its entire check-in operations at Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL) to Lobbies 2 and 3 in Terminal 1 beginning March 20.

Effective tomorrow, guests checking in for Hawaiian’s international flights will use Lobby 3, while guests on North America and Neighbor Island flights will check-in at Lobby 2.

The airline, which has been using Lobby 4 at Terminal 2 to check-in travelers to Japan, is temporarily vacating that space as it adjusts operations in response to declining travel demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We appreciate our guests’ patience and understanding as we navigate this extremely dynamic situation,” said Jeff Helfrick, vice president of airport operations at Hawaiian Airlines. “Consolidating our check-in operations allows us to continue offering the best guest experience to our guests while we adjust our network in the near term.”

Road signage reflecting the changes will be in place Friday morning.   

To ensure the health and safety of employees and guests, hand sanitizers have been made more broadly available throughout Hawaiian’s airport lobbies and offices. Self-service check-in kiosks and check-in counters are frequently cleaned and disinfected, and Hawaiian has partnered with the Hawaii State Department of Transportation to ensure hand sanitizers are readily available to travelers throughout HNL and at its airports statewide. Please visit https://www.hawaiianairlines.com/coronavirus to learn more.

Global Level 4 Health Advisory: DO NOT TRAVEL

This is a U.S. Department of State Advisory

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.  In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.  U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel. 

Many countries are experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks and implementing travel restrictions and mandatory quarantines, closing borders, and prohibiting non-citizens from entry with little advance notice.  Airlines have cancelled many international flights and several cruise operators have suspended operations or cancelled trips.  If you choose to travel internationally, your travel plans may be severely disrupted, and you may be forced to remain outside of the United States for an indefinite timeframe.

On March 14, the Department of State authorized the departure of U.S. personnel and family members from any diplomatic or consular post in the world who have determined they are at higher risk of a poor outcome if exposed to COVID-19 or who have requested departure based on a commensurate justification.  These departures may limit the ability of U.S. Embassies and consulates to provide services to U.S. citizens.

For the latest information regarding COVID-19, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website.

You are encouraged to visit travel.state.gov to view individual Travel Advisories for the most urgent threats to safety and security. Please also visit the website of the relevant U.S. embassy or consulate to see information on entry restrictions, foreign quarantine policies, and urgent health information provided by local governments.

Travelers are urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. The Department uses these Alerts to convey information about terrorist threats, security incidents, planned demonstrations, natural disasters, etc. In an emergency, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate or call the following numbers: 1(888) 407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1 (202) 501-4444 from other countries or jurisdictions.

If you decide to travel abroad or are already outside the United States:

HVNP Modifying Operations

PC: HVNP Janice Wei

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park remains open, but is modifying operations to implement the latest guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), and local and state authorities to promote social distancing. As of Tuesday, March 17, all special events and guided programs, including hikes, walks and talks, are canceled until further notice. 

Kīlauea Visitor Center is also closed, but park rangers and volunteers will be available to answer general questions about the park on the visitor center’s outdoor lānai daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Kahuku Unit is also open Wednesday through Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

All previously open trails and overlooks are open for healthy outdoor recreational opportunities. 

In addition, a community talk-story event scheduled for Thursday, March 19 in Pāhala to discuss potential future uses of Kīlauea volcano’s Great Crack area is postponed until further notice. In the meantime, the public is encouraged to submit comments via email to havo_planning@nps.gov, or in writing to Superintendent, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718. 

The health and safety of our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is our number one priority. The National Park Service (NPS) is working with the federal, state, and local authorities to closely monitor the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) situation.

We will notify the public when we resume full operations and provide updates on our website and social media channels.  

The NPS urges visitors to do their part when visiting a park and to follow CDC guidance to prevent the spread of infectious diseases by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups; washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth; covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; and most importantly, staying home if you feel sick.  

For high-risk populations, such as the elderly and people with underlying conditions, we ask that they take extra caution and follow CDC guidance for those at higher risk of serious illness.  

Updates about NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus. Please check with individual parks for specific details about park operations.

Hawaiian Airlines Suspending Sapporo Service

Hawaiian Airlines today announced it will suspend thrice-weekly nonstop service between Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL) and Sapporo’s New Chitose Airport (CTS) from April 2 through July 18. Hawaiian, which has served Sapporo since 2012, is adjusting its global network in response to declining travel demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“As we make temporary schedule adjustments in a rapidly evolving and challenging environment, we remain committed to supporting guests traveling between Japan and Hawai‘i,” said Theo Panagiotoulias, senior vice president for global sales and alliances at Hawaiian Airlines. “Sapporo is a critical city in our Japan network and we look forward to resuming service in the summer.”

Hawaiian will pause Sapporo operations after its flight from CTS to HNL on April 1. Service is scheduled to resume July 21 from HNL to CTS, and July 22 from CTS to HNL. The airline is assisting guests impacted by its network revisions by offering re-accommodations on alternative flights or providing refunds.

In addition to Sapporo, Hawaiian offers nonstop flights between Honolulu and Tokyo (Haneda and Narita airports), and Osaka’s Kansai International Airport and Fukuoka Airport.

As Hawaiian balances its network, it continues to offer guests booking flexibility and the ability to change travel plans without fees. The airline has also enhanced sanitation procedures across its business to keep aircraft and airport spaces safe and clean.