DOH Update on New Kauai COVID-19 Cases

As a result of contact tracing of a new case yesterday, Department of Health investigators have identified seven additional positive cases on Kaua‘i who are household members with the previous case. The new cases were already placed in quarantine when they were tested yesterday. Kaua‘i District Health Office is continuing their contact tracing of the household cluster this weekend and identification of additional contacts and testing is ongoing.

Kaua‘i had no cases for ten weeks and this raises the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases on the island to 29, since March. There are six (6) new cases on O‘ahu and one (1) on Maui for a total of 14 new cases confirmed in the past 24-hours, and a statewide case total of 803.  

Health Director Dr. Bruce Anderson said, “We have investigated every case with positive test results and identified several household clusters over the last few days. The identification of these clusters and subsequent investigations resulted in the isolation and quarantine of cases and close contacts. These clusters reinforce the importance of maintaining safe practices, especially wearing masks and physically distancing when meeting with people outside your immediate ohana.” One of the new cases reported on O‘ahu was associated with a previously confirmed case, where both people had attended a house party.”

State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park said, “It’s important to maintain physical distancing from those who don’t live in your household, but as this and other clusters demonstrate, coronavirus can be spread among people in the same household. We strongly urge people to take care and physically distance, no matter the setting…indoors or out, or at least wear a mask when around others outside your household.”

Health experts believe much of the spike in COVID-19 cases reported over the past few days is due to Hawai‘i residents relaxing safe practices, such as physical distancing, wearing of face masks and frequent hand washing.

“All of the people in the household cluster on Kaua‘i were isolated or quarantined promptly, said Dr. Janet Berreman, Kaua‘i District Health Officer. The decision to isolate or quarantine at home or in a facility is made jointly with the cases and contacts and the Department of Health. The option chosen is the one that works best for all. Household contacts were tested yesterday, and their results reported today. Testing of additional contacts will begin this weekend.” 

Hawai‘i COVID-19 Counts as of 12:00 noon, June 20, 2020

Island of DiagnosisNew CasesReported since2/28/2020(including new cases)Total Released from Isolation*
O‘ahu6557430
Hawai‘i08381
Maui1120111
Kaua‘i72920
Moloka‘i022
Lana‘i000
Residents Diagnosed outside HI012 
Unknown00 
Total14803 
Total released from isolation  644
Deaths017 

* Includes cases that meet isolation release criteria. 

Laboratory* Testing Data

There were 1,126 additional COVID-19 tests reported via electronic laboratory reporting.

Total Number of Individuals Testedby Clinical and State LaboratoriesPositiveNegative
67,860**80267,044

*Electronic Laboratory Reporting  **14 test results were inconclusive

15 People Cited at Kalalau on Sunday for Closed Area Violation

A team of eight law enforcement officers from the Kaua‘i Police Department (KPD), and the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) wrote 15 citations yesterday to people in the Kalalau Section of the Nā Pali Coast State Wilderness Park on Kaua‘i.

DOCARE began getting reports of people at Kalalau beginning last Wednesday. Kalalau, which lies at the end of the world-famous hike on the Nāpali Coast, remains closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Officers report that as many as 25-30 people were in the area from the middle to the end of last week. When KPD and DOCARE officers arrived, they say many people ran and prior to their arrival two large vessels had already transported people out of the area. Commercial ocean activity is always prohibited in the wilderness park.

DOCARE Chief Jason Redulla said, “We deeply appreciate the help of the Kaua‘i Police Dept., and the three officers who assisted our officers. They were notified at the last minute and quickly stepped forward to help.”

When open, the Kalalau section requires an overnight permit from the DLNR Division of State Parks. Currently the Kalalau Trail is open to Hanakāpīʻai Stream, the first two-miles of the trail and an additional two-miles to Hanakāpīʻai Falls.

The names of the people cited are not immediately available.

Shark Bites Swimmer Off Kauai Beach

Ocean Safety officials have closed Davidsons Beach in Kekaha to swimming until further notice due to an apparent shark bite that occurred approximately 8:30 a.m. on Monday.

A male resident had been surfing in waters off Kekaha at a spot commonly known as “Davidsons,” when he was bit by what appeared to be a tiger shark.

The man sustained injuries to his right hand and was transported by private vehicle to Kaua‘i Veterans Memorial Hospital.

Ocean Safety Bureau personnel have posted “Shark Sighted” and “No Swimming” signs at Davidsons Beach and are roving the shoreline to warn surfers and beachgoers to stay out of the water until further notice.

Per standard protocol, the state Department of Land and Natural Resources was notified of the incident.

OSB personnel will reassess the water Tuesday morning to determine if it is safe for swimming.

For updates on beach conditions, speak to a county lifeguard or call the Ocean Safety Bureau at 241-4984.

Seasick Boater Rescued Off Kauai

The Coast Guard and Kauai Fire Department assisted a 70-year-old boater who was suffering symptoms of severe seasickness onboard the 32-foot recreational sailing vessel Isis 18 miles northwest of Hanalei Bay, Thursday.

A Station Kauai 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew puts the sailing vessel Isis in side tow while entering Hanalei Bay, Hawaii, May 7, 2020. The crew was assisting the vessels master who was suffering from symptoms of severe sea sickness. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Hogan/Released)

A Station Kauai 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew assisted the boater, towing the vessel to Hanalei Bay. Kauai Fire Department first responders came aboard and assessed the patient upon arrival. He was transferred in stable condition.

Kauai Fire Department first responders board the sailing vessel Isis to assist a 70-year-old boater who was suffering from symptoms of severe sea sickness, Hanalei Bay, Hawaii, May, 2020. A Coast Guard Station Kauai 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew has assisted the boater and towed his vessel 18 miles back to Kauai and waiting emergency services. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Hogan/Released)

“The boater made the right decision when he notified us of his condition,” said Fireman Johanna Thompson, a Coast Guard Sector Honolulu watchstander. “At the time, he did not require assistance, but it is always best to err on the side of caution and tell someone if you believe you may be in trouble so we can properly monitor the situation and act if necessary.”

At 10 p.m., Wednesday, the boater notified Sector Honolulu watchstanders of his condition, which he stated were not severe but wanted to let someone know his situation. He intended to get some sleep and reassess in the morning. 

A Station Kauai 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew member stands tow watch as they tow the sailing vessel Isis back to Kauai, Hawaii, May 7, 2020. The crew was assisting a 70-year-old male boater who was suffering symptoms of severe sea sickness. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Hogan/Released)

Sector Honolulu watchstanders asked pertinent COVID-19 questions and consulted the duty flight surgeon who agreed with their plan to establish a communication schedule and contact the boater in the morning. The boater was not displaying symptoms of COVID-19. 

At 5 a.m., Thursday, Sector Honolulu watchstanders made contact again with the boater who stated his condition was unchanged. Throughout the night, the vessel drifted the northwest, and watchstanders launched the RB-M crew to assist. 

A Station Kauai 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew tows the sailing vessel Isis back to Hanalei Bay, Hawaii, May 7, 2020. The crew was assisting a boater who was suffering symptoms of severe seasickness. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Hogan/Released)

The RB-M crew arrived on the scene, about 16 miles from the previous position, and found the boater in the vessel’s cabin. He was conscious but unable to leave his rack. RB-M personnel remained aboard the sailing vessel and put it in tow back to Kauai. The boater’s condition improved when they reached calmer water. 

The weather at the time of the medevac was reportedly winds of 20 mph and seas up to 6 feet.

Kaua‘i District Health Office to Conduct Survey to Assess COVID-19 Impact

 The Hawai‘i Department of Health’s (DOH) Kaua‘i District Health Office (KDHO) will conduct a Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response, known as a CASPER survey to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Kaua‘i households.

Survey teams will go door-to-door, April 22-24, to 30 census tracts that are weighted towards more populated areas within the county. Seven houses within each tract will be systematically selected and surveyed. Survey teams are comprised of DOH staff with support from the Kaua‘i Emergency Management Agency, Kaua‘i Medical Reserve Corps, and the American Red Cross. Teams will be wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) and social distancing will be observed. Participating households can complete the survey over the phone, if preferred.

“We greatly appreciate the participation of Kaua‘i residents in this effort to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and immediate needs of our community,” said Kaua‘i District Health Officer Dr. Janet Berreman.

Selected households will be asked about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to COVID-19, as well as the financial and mental health impacts on people in their households. Team members will have on vests identifying themselves as part of the DOH-CASPER survey team and will carry identification cards. All survey responses are confidential, and names and addresses won’t be collected.

The CASPER survey methodology was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a way to rapidly assess the health and other resource needs of a community after a disaster. The data gathered will help the County of Kaua‘i and Department of Health meet the immediate needs of Kaua‘i families.

If you have questions about the CASPER survey, please call:

Lauren Guest

Hawai‘i State Department of Health

Public Health Preparedness Planner

Kaua‘i District Health Office

(808) 241-3496

Hypersonic Weapon Tested Off Kauai

The Department of Defense successfully tested a hypersonic glide body in a flight experiment conducted from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii, March 19 at approximately 10:30 p.m. local time (HST).

KAUAI, Hawaii (March 19, 2020) A common hypersonic glide body (C-HGB) launches from Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii, at approximately 10:30 p.m. local time, March 19, 2020, during a Department of Defense flight experiment. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Army jointly executed the launch of the C-HGB, which flew at hypersonic speed to a designated impact point. Concurrently, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) monitored and gathered tracking data from the flight experiment that will inform its ongoing development of systems designed to defend against adversary hypersonic weapons. Information gathered from this and future experiments will further inform DOD’s hypersonic technology development. The department is working in collaboration with industry and academia to field hypersonic warfighting capabilities in the early- to mid-2020s. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

The U.S. Navy and U.S. Army jointly executed the launch of a common hypersonic glide body (C-HGB), which flew at hypersonic speed to a designated impact point.

Concurrently, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) monitored and gathered tracking data from the flight experiment that will inform its ongoing development of systems designed to defend against adversary hypersonic weapons.

Information gathered from this and future experiments will further inform DOD’s hypersonic technology development, and this event is a major milestone towards the department’s goal of fielding hypersonic warfighting capabilities in the early- to mid-2020s.

”This test builds on the success we had with Flight Experiment 1 in October 2017, in which our C-HGB achieved sustained hypersonic glide at our target distances,” said Vice Adm. Johnny R. Wolfe, Director, Navy’s Strategic Systems Programs, which is the lead designer for the C-HGB. ”In this test we put additional stresses on the system and it was able to handle them all, due to the phenomenal expertise of our top notch team of individuals from across government, industry and academia. Today we validated our design and are now ready to move to the next phase towards fielding a hypersonic strike capability.”

Hypersonic weapons, capable of flying at speeds greater than five times the speed of sound (Mach 5), are highly maneuverable and operate at varying altitudes. This provides the warfighter with an ability to strike targets hundreds and even thousands of miles away, in a matter of minutes, to defeat a wide range of high-value targets. Delivering hypersonic weapons is one of the department’s highest technical research and engineering priorities.

”This test was a critical step in rapidly delivering operational hypersonic capabilities to our warfighters in support of the National Defense Strategy,” said U.S. Army LTG L. Neil Thurgood, Director of Hypersonics, Directed Energy, Space and Rapid Acquisition, whose office is leading the Army’s Long Range Hypersonic Weapon program and joint C-HGB production. “We successfully executed a mission consistent with how we can apply this capability in the future. The joint team did a tremendous job in executing this test, and we will continue to move aggressively to get prototypes to the field.”

The C-HGB – when fully fielded – will comprise the weapon’s conventional warhead, guidance system, cabling, and thermal protection shield. The Navy and Army are working closely with industry to develop the C-HGB with Navy as the lead designer, and Army as the lead for production. Each service will use the C-HGB, while developing individual weapon systems and launchers tailored for launch from sea or land.

The similarities in hypersonic weapon design for sea and land variants provide economies of scale for future production as we build the U.S. hypersonics industrial base.

“Hypersonic systems deliver transformational warfighting capability,” said Mr. Mike White, Assistant Director, Hypersonics, OUSD Research and Engineering (Modernization). “The glide body tested today is now ready for transition to Army and Navy weapon system development efforts and is one of several applications of hypersonic technology underway across the Department. These capabilities help ensure that our warfighters will maintain the battlefield dominance necessary to deter, and if necessary, defeat any future adversary.”

Additionally, MDA is working closely with Army and Navy in sharing data that will inform their development of enhanced capabilities for a layered hypersonic defense to support warfighter need and outpace the adversary threat. 

Meet Barack Obama the Whale Shark

A whale shark spotted off the Island of Kauai on Feb. 14, 2020, has been given the name of Barack Obama by the Cascadia Research Collective.

Barack Obama PC: Cascadia Research Collective

The collective posted the following on their Facebook Page:

“During our February 2020 Kaua’i field project we spotted a whale shark and submitted photos to the Hawaii Uncharted Research Collective for their whale shark photo-ID catalog. Our individual was new to their catalog, so we had the privilege to name the shark – we chose Barack Obama, in recognition of the first Hawaiian-born president of the United States.”

For more information on the Kaua’i field project click here.

Counties Roll Out Plans to Mitigate the Spread of COVID-19

Following the State of Hawai‘i’s plan for “15-Days to Slow the Spread” of COVID-19, Hawai‘i’s mayors have recently implemented county plans that are geared to their island residents. Department of Health supports everyone’s efforts to keep the community safe and healthy.

“We can be more effective in mitigating the spread of COVID-19 if everyone takes these aggressive actions seriously,” said Bruce Anderson, director of the Hawai‘i Department of Health. “The response to the Governor and County directives has been positive so far and there are many, such as food establishments, which have identified alternative ways to serve the public with drive-through and take-out service to maintain their operations.”  

  • The City and County of Honolulu has mandated the closure of restaurants, parks and nightclubs for indoor service beginning 8:30 a.m. on Friday, March 20. Restaurant take-out, curb-side pick-up and delivery will be allowed. 
     
  • The County of Kaua‘i issued an islandwide nighttime curfew beginning Friday, March 20. The curfew will be in effect from 9 p.m. through 5 a.m. daily until further notice. Individuals must remain in their residence during these specified hours, with a few exceptions. 
     
  • The County of Maui announced rules that will be in effect beginning 7:45 a.m. on Friday, March 20, limiting the gathering of groups of people and curtailing vehicular transportation except for essential activities or operation of essential business or government functions. Restaurants and cafes that serve food within the premises are required to close; however, take-out and delivery service may continue.
  • Hawai‘i County issued guidance that restaurants, bars and places of worship may make their own decisions to open or close, and consider ways to minimize risk to customers and employees.

Please visit the county websites for more information.

Be Considerate When Purchasing Food and Supplies 
The DOH reminds the public to be judicious when shopping for food and essential goods so that kūpuna and others in need are able to purchase necessary items. The Hawai‘i Department of Transportation (HDOT) Harbors Division continues to manage Hawai‘i’s commercial ports–the lifeline for Hawai‘i’s communities for food, medical supplies, clothing, household goods and more. There have been no interruptions to the supply chain as a result of COVID-19.

Definition of Community Spread 
Community spread is defined as cases that cannot be traced back to a traveler and have absolutely no travel related or involved connection with travel. As of noon today, March 19, all cases who tested positive in Hawaiʻi are travel related or involved with visitors on a daily basis.

Who should be tested for COVID-19?

Most people who are sick do not need to be tested. There is no specific medicine to treat COVID-19, so whether you test positive or negative, management of your illness will be the same.

Individuals who are not sick should not be tested even if they have been exposed to COVID-19.


Individuals who are sick with respiratory illness (e.g., fever and cough or shortness of breath)  AND who are at a higher risk for severe respiratory infections (e.g., older people, those with chronic medical conditions including immunosuppression) should call their usual source of healthcare to discuss whether they should be tested for COVID-19 and/or other infections such as influenza.

  • A provider’s referral is required to receive testing. 
  • If you do not have a provider, call an urgent care center or community clinic in your area.

Anyone having difficulty breathing should seek medical care immediately. If possible, call your healthcare provider first so they are prepared to receive you.

Other people with mild illness should help protect our most vulnerable and conserve our precious supplies by practicing social distancing measures, monitoring their illness, and calling their healthcare provider if their symptoms worsen or persist. 

State Launches New, Dedicated COVID-19 Website 
The State of Hawai‘i unveiled a new website for the public to access the latest information on COVID-19 in Hawai‘i. The website, hawaiicovid19.com, is an inter-agency collaborative effort to keep the community safe and healthy. It provides timely information and resources on the coronavirus, including guidance on how to prevent and mitigate community spread, common symptoms of COVID-19, and frequently asked questions.

Social Distancing 
COVID-19 recommendations are changing the rules on how much physical distance individuals should keep from each other. Cancelling events that do not allow attendees to be at least six feet apart—the equivalent of two arms length—and avoiding unnecessary physical meeting with others are proven strategies to mitigate the spread of the virus. The effectiveness of these initiatives largely depends on the cooperation and compliance from the public.

“One of the best ways to show aloha for each other at this critical time is to refrain from being in large gatherings and to keep a safe, healthy distance from each other,” said Health Director Bruce Anderson. “You may be healthy, but others around you may not be as fortunate. By practicing social distancing, you’re limiting the potential for exposure to any illness in your household and protecting everyone in our community. We all need to consider the health and wellbeing of others, especially seniors, those with preexisting health conditions and others whose health may be compromised.”

Anderson noted that technology enables us to have social distance without sacrificing emotional connection. “When feasible, we should use tools available for virtual meetings by phone, tablet or computer as a way to maintain contact with loved ones, especially kupuna in care homes given Gov. Ige’s directive to refrain from visiting nursing homes, retirement or long-term care facilities at this time.”

Ten New Positive Cases on O‘ahu and Maui 
As of March 19, 2020, noon, there is a total of 26 confirmed or presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 in Hawai‘i. New positive results were announced today for eight individuals on O‘ahu and two individuals on Maui. All cases who tested positive in Hawaiʻi are travel related.

The Department of Health will be confirming case numbers daily at noon. The situation is fluid with constant changes. Any additional case information received after noon will be reported the following day.

COVID-19 Summary of Numbers as of March 19, 2020 at 12:00 p.m. HST

(updated as new information becomes available)

Number of Total Positive Case(s)* Statewide                         26

Honolulu                                                                               18

Maui County                                                                         5

Kaua‘i                                                                                   2

Hawai‘i Island                                                                        1

*Includes confirmed and presumptive cases.

Confirmed: Meets CDC criteria and positive test result received from a certified laboratory such as the DOH State Laboratories Division.

Presumptive Positive: Positive test results from a private laboratory requiring confirmation by a state public health laboratory.

Sentinel Surveillance Testing Results

The DOH has received 124 negative results from test samples selected from sites statewide with the goal of identifying possible community transmission of COVID-19. There were 62 negative test results received last week and 62 negative test results received this week.

2-1-1 Call Center for Information on COVID-19

The Aloha United Way call center is open daily between 7 a.m. – 10 p.m. For information or questions about COVID-19:

1% Transient Accommodations Tax Increase Takes Effect January 1, 2018

Please be advised that, effective January 1, 2018, the Transient Accommodations Tax (TAT) applied to lodging accommodations in the State of Hawaii will be increased by 1%, raising the TAT from its current rate of 9.25% to 10.25%. This increase is scheduled to stay in effect until December 31, 2030.

The TAT increase is being put into effect to help pay for Honolulu’s rapid transit system that is currently under construction. The light metro rail system will extend 20 miles from Kapolei in Leeward Oahu to Ala Moana Center in Honolulu with 21 stations along the way, including the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, the State of Hawaii’s main port of entry for air transportation.

Following is a summary of State taxes that will be applied by lodging properties statewide when the 1% TAT increase takes effect on January 1, 2018:

Oahu
4.712%: General Excise Tax
10.25%: Transient Accommodations Tax (TAT)
14.962%: TOTAL Lodging Taxes

Maui County / Island of Hawaii / Kauai
4.166%: General Excise Tax
10.25%: Transient Accommodations Tax (TAT)
14.416%: TOTAL Lodging Taxes

Click here to see the notice issued by the Hawaii State Department of Taxation providing detailed information about the changes in State law that applies to the 1% TAT increase.

Any questions regarding the implementation of the 1% TAT increase should be directed to the Hawaii State Department of Taxation via email at Tax.Rules.Office@hawaii.gov or by calling 808-587-1530.

Hawaiian Electric Companies Launch Online Tool to Streamline Solar Application Process

Customers submitting new applications to install private rooftop solar can now complete the process entirely online using a new tool launched by the Hawaiian Electric Companies.

The Customer Interconnection Tool (CIT) is believed to be the first of its kind to provide a seamless, start-to-finish online solar application process that allows customers of Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric and Hawaii Electric Light to check the status of their applications. The tool provides a user-friendly interface to guide contractors and customers through all steps of the Customer Self-Supply program application process, from submittal to finalizing the agreement.

“We’re excited to offer a streamlined electronic process to our customers,” said Jim Alberts, senior vice president of customer service. “The tool is able to show customers exactly where they are in the application process, which eliminates guesswork. This is one more way to make interacting with our companies as smooth and as easy as possible.”

CIT allows applicants to submit all of their information, including electronic documents, online. For convenience, customers and their designated representatives will have the ability to submit electronic signatures as well.

Applicants are prompted to provide required documentation, reducing the potential for delays caused by errors of omission. The tool also automatically calculates the system size based on four design guidelines, which simplifies the procedure.

Customers will receive regular status updates by email as various milestones are reached, keeping them informed every step of the way.

For more information, visit:

www.hawaiianelectric.com/DistributedEnergyResources

www.hawaiianelectric.com/CITonline

Hōkūleʻa Greeted by Hundreds During Her Hanalei Arrival

Crewmembers aboard Hōkūleʻa and sister canoe Hikianalia arrived this morning to Kauaʻi greeted by scores of outrigger paddlers, ocean enthusiasts and a pod of dolphins as they entered Hanalei Bay. Hundreds of ʻohana and supporters lined the pier to near-capacity where the crew was greeted ashore by students, Hawaiian practitioners and a hula halau and other supporters from across the island.

Voyagers departed from Haleiwa, Oʻahu yesterday and reached their destination after 12 hours of sailing through the night amid clear skies and steady tradewinds. Hōkūleʻa was captained by Kamaki Worthington, North Shore resident, while navigation student Koral McCarthy provided direction via traditional Polynesian wayfinding techniques.

“Hōkūleʻa pulls people together. We prepare for her visit like we would for a visit from Tutu. She teaches us about respect and challenges us to rise up to our kuleana. She reminds us how we treat her is how we should treat our earth and each other,” said McCarthy who also coordinated arrival ceremonies and much of the week’s coming events.

The Kauaʻi port stop and outreach events were planned by the Polynesian Voyaging Society and coordinated by local community members and supporters as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail, an extension of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. The sail includes similar visits to every major Hawaiian island into 2018.

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates.

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule (*All dates and times subject to change)

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Niumalu Park

October through May port dates will be posted as they become available.

Hōkūleʻa to Set Sail for Kauaʻi

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Haleiwa Boat Harbor for Hanalei Bay, Kauaʻi as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail. Crewmembers are preparing to set sail tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and arrive to Kauaʻi the following morning that will include a public arrival ceremony at 10 a.m..

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates:

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule – (*All dates and times subject to change)

Saturday, September 23
• 2:30 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departure from Haleʻiwa Boat Harbor, Oʻahu – public welcome

Sunday, September 24
• 10 a.m. Hōkūleʻa arrival ceremony and community paʻina at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Nuimalu Park

Former Kauai Police Officer Indicted for Cyberstalking Offenses

Attorney General Doug Chin announced that a Kauai grand jury this week indicted Lihue resident Damian Loo (sp?) for harassment by stalking and use of a computer in the commission of a separate crime.

While employed at the Kauai police department, Loo allegedly used the computer surveillance system to watch a civilian female co-worker as she came and went to work for approximately three weeks earlier this year.

Attorney General Chin stated: “Harassment by stalking victimizes individuals and hurts them. Don’t do it.”

Harassment by stalking is a misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of one year in jail and a $2,000.00 fine. Use of a computer in the commission of separate crime is a class C felony and carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $10,000.00 fine.

Loo is 49 years old and has no prior convictions. He posted bail in the amount of $1,000.00. He is presumed innocent unless and until he is found guilty of the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

USS John Paul Jones Intercepts Target Missile Off Coast of Hawaii

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and U.S. Navy sailors aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) successfully conducted a complex missile defense flight test, resulting in the intercept of a medium-range ballistic missile (MRBM) target using Standard Missile (SM) 6 guided missiles during a test off the coast of Hawaii, Aug. 29.

A medium-range ballistic missile target is launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, Aug. 29. (U.S. Navy/Latonja Martin)

John Paul Jones detected and tracked a target missile launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii, with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar and onboard SM-6 missiles executed the intercept.

“We are working closely with the fleet to develop this important new capability, and this was a key milestone in giving our Aegis BMD (Ballistic Missile Defense) ships an enhanced capability to defeat ballistic missiles in their terminal phase,” said MDA Director Lt. Gen. Sam Greaves. “We will continue developing ballistic missile defense technologies to stay ahead of the threat as it evolves.”

This test, designated Flight Test Standard Missile (FTM) 27 Event 2, marks the second time that an SM-6 missile has successfully intercepted a medium-range ballistic missile target.

Aegis BMD is the naval component of the Ballistic Missile Defense System. MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program.

Maui Lawmaker Calls on Governor to Resolve Bus Crisis

West Maui lawmaker Representative Angus McKelvey today called on Governor David Ige to intervene in the student transportation crisis that has adversely affected West Maui as well as other school districts on Maui and Kauai.

HIDOE is seeking school bus drivers with valid Commercial Drivers Licenses to service routes on Maui and Kauai. For a limited time, school bus contractors are offering hiring bonuses and increased wages. Photo Credit: Department of Education

“The situation is completely unacceptable, especially when you consider all the Lahainaluna High School students that need access to a campus that is not readily serviced by other transportation means including a county bus route,” McKelvey said. “The bus shortage has exasperated an already existing traffic problem as parents are now scrambling to get kids to school by their own means before the workday.”

McKelvey’s concerns are with parents and families who may not be able to afford private transportation and solely rely on the bus system to get their keiki to and from school.

“Parents who don’t have the means to afford last-minute private transportation are going to be stuck between a rock and a hard place trying to get the kids to school,” he said. “And, while the Department of Education’s relaxation of the tardy rules and breakfast times will help somewhat, many of these kids may be forced to miss large segments of school time. This, in turn, could result in inadvertent involvement in the court system for their parents because their children are not being at school for the required amount of time.”

McKelvey believes that “it is unfair to parents in this situation to be faced with potential legal consequences for actions beyond their control especially considering the last minute notification of the bus shortage.

“It is especially troubling that the DOE spokesperson said that there were no reported problems related to the bus issues only illustrates further that the DOE is disconnected from the challenges that we are facing with this issue here on West Maui,” McKelvey said.

The West Maui lawmaker also expressed his concern that the Board of Education allowed the bus contract issue to “spiral out of control” before the beginning of the school year and a shortage of drivers should have been discussed well before the start of school.

“The lack of qualified drivers for certain routes should also have been disclosed during the procurement process,” he said. “Especially when it is a new Oahu based vendor that has never provided any transportation for the schools in Maui before.

“On behalf of all the hard working parents and their keiki of West Maui, I am humbly asking the Governor to step in and have the Board of Education either issue a supplemental contract for the busing services at Lahainaluna High School, and any other areas, or rescind the contract in its entirety for failure to perform.

“With the start of the high school on Wednesday, and other major traffic events coming up, this situation could go from bad to very bad in a short period of time,” McKelvey said. “The bottom line is the vendor should be able to perform as promised, and did not timely notify the DOE. Therefore, the department and the Governor need to use their powers of the executive branch to take whatever actions are necessary to address this bus driver shortage – an issue which never should have occurred of in the first place.

“In an area where the schools are not serviced by county bus routes, an immediate busing option is needed, especially for parents and families who can’t afford to simply call a taxi or grab a rental car to get the kids to school before going to their two or three jobs needed just to make ends meet.”

School Bus Drivers Needed for Maui & Kauai Routes Before Fall Semester Begins On August 7

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) is seeking school bus drivers with valid Commercial Drivers Licenses (CDL) to service routes on Maui and Kauai. A current shortage of school bus drivers may affect Maui and Kauai routes when school begins on Monday, August 7.

HIDOE is seeking school bus drivers with valid Commercial Drivers Licenses to service routes on Maui and Kauai. For a limited time, school bus contractors are offering hiring bonuses and increased wages. Photo Credit: Department of Education

“The Department is working with our bus contractors and transportation partners to minimize any impacts to our students and families when the fall semester begins,” said Assistant Superintendent Dann Carlson. “Some school bus routes are being consolidated and many will operate normally, but we hope to sign up additional drivers before the school year begins.”

For a limited time, school bus contractors are offering hiring bonuses and increased wages. Interested CDL drivers should contact the Student Transportation Services Branch at (808) 586-0170 as soon as possible.

Nearly Eleven Tons of Rubbish Removed From Kalalau in 2017

Since the first of this year, DLNR Division of State Parks maintenance staff on Kaua‘i have gathered, bagged, and airlifted 10.92 tons of rubbish from the Kalalau section of the Napali Coast State Wilderness Park.  At least monthly, regular clean-up operations, have resulted in between 520 pounds and 2380 pounds of trash and waste being airlifted by helicopter out of the area. During some months maintenance crews conducted two-to-four operations.

“Clearly this huge quantity of rubbish was not carried in on the backs of people who obtained permits to hike the 11 miles into Kalalau,” said State Parks Administrator Curt Cottrell. “Over the past two years we’ve made significant progress in dismantling illegal, long-term camps both at Kalalau beach and in more remote locations in Kalalau Valley. In collaboration with the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE), we’ve made it very clear that we have zero tolerance for illegal activity in our state’s largest and most remote state park,” Cottrell added.

In June alone, during five clean-up days, helicopters sling-loaded nearly seven thousand pounds of trash and waste out of Kalalau. Human waste is shoveled into barrels out of composting toilets in the designated camping area fronting Kalalau beach and flown out for proper treatment and disposal.  State Park staff continues to be concerned about environmental degradation and health risks associated with people defecating in the forest and along the streams in the park and the associated impacts to archeological sites from being modified for camping uses.   “These are the critical reasons diligent attention must be directed to eliminating illegal activity at Kalalau and elsewhere in the Napali Coast State Wilderness Park.  As an example, by enforcing the limit of campers to the allowed 60 people each night, the composters should function as designed and our maintenance crew can turn their priorities to other site enhancements,” Cottrell said.

Regular monthly maintenance operations are conducted not only to clean-up the rubbish left at illegal camps and to remove human waste, but also to trim weeds, maintain signs and camp trails, and restock comfort stations.  The Division of State Parks plans to renew its request to the Hawai‘i State Legislature next year for permanent staffing at Kalalau to ensure higher quality of maintenance of the park’s wilderness character, protect cultural sites and to provide visitor information, as well as to maintain communications capability in case of emergencies and to report illegal activities to enforcement.

Rescued Hawaiian Short-Eared Owl Killed In Auto Collision

A young Pueo, or Hawaiian Short-eared Owl, rescued in late March, was killed by a car on the highway between Waimea and Hanapepe two months after it had been released. The owl was originally spotted on March 22, 2017 by Dr. André Raine of the Kaua‘i Endangered Seabird Recovery Project (KESRP), who found it on the side of the road in Ele ele where it had also been struck by a car. He took the injured Pueo to the Save our Shearwaters (SOS) facility at the Kaua‘i Humane Society for treatment and rehabilitation.

Raine said, “This is a sad end to a successful rehabilitation story, which involved the hard work of the dedicated staff at SOS and the Hawaii Wildlife Center who were successful in returning this young bird to health and releasing it back into the wild in late April. Tragically, as with so many of our endangered native birds, the Pueo was struck again by an automobile – this time fatally. This serves as yet another reminder for all of us who drive on Kauai’s roads, that we need to slow down and be aware of owls, Nene, fledgling seabirds and other birds that may be feeding or flying alongside or near roads and highways.”

Tracy Anderson of SOS, who examined the dead owl, said that the injuries were consistent with being struck by a vehicle. The bird was found 6 miles (as the bird flies) from the release location and was in good body condition which meant that she had been hunting and feeding successfully post-release. Owls are often attracted to roadsides by rats and mice, which in turn are attracted by the easy pickings of food scraps and rubbish discarded by people. Anderson reminds people, “The act of throwing trash out your car window not only impacts the environment visually, but can have direct and detrimental effects on wild birds like pueo and nene.”

Over the past few months a public education campaign was initiated by DLNR and other partners to encourage people to watch for nene (native Hawaiian goose and Hawai‘i State Bird) alongside roadways. This included a public service announcement (PSA) that aired repeatedly on Kaua‘i’s cable television system, news releases and videos, and additional roadside signage in areas where nene are frequently spotted.

This is not the only Pueo found dead on the roads – two more dead Pueo were found on the same day as the rehabilitated bird in other parts of the island.

Another Pueo, also likely hurt in a car-bird collision on O‘ahu’s North Shore earlier this year could not be rehabilitated and had to be put to sleep. An entire family of nene depicted in a DLNR video, resting and feeding near the Hanalei River Bridge on Kaua‘i were also killed by a car.

Raine, Anderson, and others who work with native, wild birds agree that if drivers slow down and pay close attention in areas populated by birds, this will help reduce the number of deadly collisions between birds and cars.

Hawaii Update on Mumps: Outbreak Continues with 18 Additional Cases, Including 2 on Hawaii Island and 4 on Kauai

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed 18 new cases of residents with the mumps, raising the total number of statewide cases this year to 172. Nine of the new cases of individuals are adults. Twelve of the cases are from Oahu, four are from Kauai and two are from Hawaii Island.

DOH continues to stress the importance of following its recommendations to help prevent the spread of mumps.“The important thing for people to remember is to keep their germs to themselves,” said Ronald Balajadia, Immunization Branch Chief, DOH Disease Outbreak Control Division. “We encourage the public to stay home when sick, cover their mouths when coughing or sneezing, wash their hands frequently and make sure they are fully vaccinated.”

DOH urges all adults born in or after 1957 without evidence of immunity to mumps to receive the MMR vaccine which prevents most, but not all, cases of mumps. Individuals with only one documented MMR dose are strongly encouraged to consider receiving a second vaccine dose at a minimum of four weeks after the first dose. Two doses of the vaccine are 88 percent effective at protecting against mumps and one dose is 78 percent effective. For this reason, being fully vaccinated is important in helping to protect family members, friends, coworkers, classmates, and your community.

DOH also recommends that all children receive two doses of the MMR vaccine, the first of which is routinely given at age 12–15 months and the second dose at 4–6 years of age. However, because of the continued circulation of mumps in Hawaii, children between 1–4 years of age should receive their second dose now (a minimum of four weeks after the first dose).

To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

The majority of the 172 confirmed cases are on Oahu, with 13 on Kauai and three from Hawaii Island. None of the individuals required hospitalization and all are recovering. DOH expects more cases in the coming weeks as mumps is a highly-contagious disease.

DOH will post the latest mumps cases online at: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/ at 12 noon every Thursday. The site offers current information about the state’s ongoing investigation.

Hawaii DLNR Applauds Environmental Court for Sending Strong Message to Albatross Killer

DLNR Chair Suzanne Case today, applauded Environmental Court Judge Jeannette Castagnetti for sending a strong message to the community and to one of the men convicted of the brutal killing of albatross at Ka‘ena Point Natural Area Reserve (NAR) on O‘ahu in December 2015.

“The fact that this man will serve jail time and community service recognizes the severity of these killings and the terrible impact it will have for years to come on the albatross breeding colony at Ka‘ena Point,” Case said after the sentencing of Christian Guiterrez. She added, “Jail time, combined with the fine, sends a very strong message to the community that there is no tolerance for abuse, destruction, or killing of Hawai‘i’s unique and precious wildlife – whether it’s albatross, monk seals, turtles, or anything else.”

Christian Guiterrez file photo

Case and Marigold Zoll, the O‘ahu Branch Manager for the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife both presented victim impact statements during today’s sentencing. Zoll provided background on laws, funding, and on the public values of impacted resources. She pointed out that the Ka‘ena Point NAR has been under active management for the past 34 years by DLNR, contractors, conservation partners, and a wide variety of dedicated volunteers.

Zoll testified, “Unlike wildlife found in other places, albatross are so docile that I would trust my eight-year-old child to wander amongst them without threat of injury. The impact of this crime extends well beyond the 32 animals we know were killed. Based on conservative estimates of lifespan, reproduction rates and fledgling success we estimate we lost 320 animals from the intentional killing of 32 adults and eggs by Gutierrez and his friends.” Zoll concluded her testimony saying, “The Department considers the killing or taking or protected wildlife to be the most egregious trespass of our laws.”

DLNR is heartened by the tremendous amount of community outrage directed toward the perpetrators of this heartless action and believes that outrage helped inform the judicial system and today’s resulting sentence. Case said, “It showed that most people truly care about our natural resources and that when they are abused or mistreated in any way, they expect us, prosecutors, and the courts to do the right thing. Today a very strong message was sent that these crimes will not be tolerated and will be punished to the fullest extent possible.”

As part of her testimony Case played a DLNR produced video that depicts the work being done with the albatross colony at Ka‘ena Point NAR: