Power Restored to Entire Big Island Following Major Storm

Hawaii Electric Light has completed repairs to all major damage caused by a storm system that passed over the islands late last week. At about 2:00 p.m. today, power was restored to the remaining 10 customers on Cane Haul Road (Honokaa) and in a remote area of Waipio Valley.

HELCO at Waipio“We would like to thank the community for their patience and understanding as we worked to safely restore electric service,” said Rhea Lee, Hawaii Electric Light spokesperson. “We realize how frustrating and difficult it is to be without electricity for an extended period of time, and our dedicated employees worked very long hours to assist customers and restore service as quickly as possible.

“The safety of the community and our employees always is our top priority. This storm damaged infrastructure around the island and some of the more extensive damage occurred in remote areas that were difficult to access until fallen trees and brush were removed, hindering repair progress in some cases.”

Hawaii Electric Light also reminds the community to be safe and treat all downed power lines as energized and dangerous. Do not handle or move any fallen or damaged utility equipment. If someone is injured by a downed power line, do not approach them. Call 9-1-1 for assistance.

The community is reminded to be cautious of trees that could have been weakened by the storm. Storms can weaken trees and their branches but not break them. Winds can topple weakened trees after a storm has passed, and this could cause new power interruptions.

Please call 969-6666 to report an outage, downed power line, or damaged utility equipment.

Puna Lava Flow Heads Towards Ainaloa

Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow has not advanced any closer to Pahoa Marketplace, but is still active. Breakouts were also active near the True/Mid-Pacific geothermal well site, and along the distal 3 km (2 miles) of the flow, where a narrow lobe has been advancing toward the north-northeast.

The view is to the southwest.  (Click to enlarge)

The view is to the southwest. (Click to enlarge)

This shows a comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image of the flow front. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image. White and yellow pixels in the thermal image show areas of active breakouts.

 Although the leading tip of the flow has stalled, the thermal image shows that active breakouts are present a short distance upslope of the stalled tip.  (Click to enlarge)

Although the leading tip of the flow has stalled, the thermal image shows that active breakouts are present a short distance upslope of the stalled tip. (Click to enlarge)

This view, looking northeast, shows the distal part of the flow, with the flow lobe behind Pahoa Marketplace to the right and the newer north-northeast advancing lobe to the left.

Ainaloa at top left.  (Click to enlarge)

Ainaloa at top left. (Click to enlarge)

The north-northeast lobe is following a drainage that leads to the steepest-descent path that crosses Highway 130 about 1 km (0.6 mi) south of the Maku`u Farmer’s Market. The flow, however, is still 3.5 km (2.2 mi) upslope from that spot and moving slowly.

This photo shows a closer view of the narrow north-northeast advancing lobe about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) upslope from the Pahoa Markplace. The view is to the northwest. (Click to enlarge)

This photo shows a closer view of the narrow north-northeast advancing lobe about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) upslope from the Pahoa Markplace. The view is to the northwest. (Click to enlarge)