New University of Hawaii Football Helmet???

Well I wonder what twitter user @BestofNike (Followed by 154,950 followers at the time of this post) meant when they sent out a tweet showing a depiction of a new UH Football helmet.

Is this football helmet going to be worn soon?

Is this football helmet going to be worn soon?

Here is a screen capture of the cryptic tweet:
New UH Helmet Tweet

UH Hilo to Open Pharmacy on Campus, Not-For-Profit Clinic Primarily For Students

Students at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo can soon leave Student Medical Services with a prescription filled by a pharmacist for the first time thanks to a collaborative effort from Student Medical Services (a unit in Student Health & Wellness Programs) and faculty from the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP).

UH Hilo

Mimi Pezzuto, an instructor at DKICP, has volunteered to work with Heather Hirata at Student Medical Services in order to give students access to better health care. Pezzuto applied to the Hawaiʻi Board of Pharmacy for the clinic pharmacy to get state licensure, and was appointed Pharmacist in Charge in March. An official agreement is projected to take effect Oct. 2 that will allow pharmacy students to take part in patient care.

“This is a grassroots movement, but the goal is to operate as a fully functioning pharmacy,” said Hirata, a board-certified nurse practitioner who has supervised students from nursing programs at UH Hilo and UH Manoa. “Pharmacy students will be able to work alongside nursing students. We’re all in the same field so there are opportunities for everyone to learn something new.”

Pharmacy students have been able to contribute to the clinic in the past by labeling and stocking the medicine cabinets. Now with faculty supervision, they will be able to have direct contact with patients from the beginning of their care.

“I get to roll up my sleeves and get back in the trenches to do what I was trained to do, which is spend time with patients,” said Pezzuto, who teaches a class on Health Care Systems and is a licensed pharmacist. “Because we can take the time to have one-on-one conversations before filling a prescription, I can find out so much more about the other medications they might be taking and have an in-depth discussion about their drug therapy without interruption or pressure to perform other tasks.”

Pezzuto has had a chance to see the clinic in action while setting up the pharmacy with Hirata. She was there when a patient came in in the midst of an asthma attack and they were able to administer medication during her attack.

Another student came in complaining of severe migraines. After a discussion with her doctor, it was determined her headaches may not be migraines, and alternate medication regimens are being examined.

“Those are the kinds of opportunities pharmacists should have but often don’t because of demands on their time,” Pezzuto said. “It’s not often a pharmacist will have access to a patient’s chart. But this is the whole idea of being a clinical pharmacist.”

Pezzuto aims to set up hours at least two days a week talking to patients and helping to determine what they might need. Students are already signing up to give vaccinations with faculty supervision.

The not-for-profit clinic is open primarily to students, but the family planning clinic is open to the general public. It functions in four small rooms on the second floor of the Campus Center. Thanks to federal funding for family planning, patients have a choice whether to use insurance or not, and there’s a sliding scale for medications.

“I hope to bring students here eventually so they can learn the finer details of filling a prescription, from talking to the patient to filing for insurance if they have it,” Pezzuto said. “We also want to give them a chance to practice immunization skills, which will help them when they finish school.”

Pezzuto also is planning a fundraiser concert featuring local students studying under a world-renowned pianist on Oct. 13, with proceeds to benefit expanded student services with the Student Medical Services. She said working at the Student Medical Services gives DKICP another chance to be a part of the University and the greater community.

“We help our students plan several health fairs throughout the year on every major island in the state, and that helps remind us of our purpose, which is to help the community in which we live,” she said. “I’m really excited to find opportunities on campus where we can do the same thing.”


 

Keiki Triathlon Taking Place Week After Ford Ironman Triathlon

­­The Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League and the Hawaiʻi County Department of Parks and Recreation are once again co-sponsoring the “Keiki Triathlon.”

triathlon

It will take place in Kailua-Kona on October 19, the weekend after the Ford Ironman Triathlon. This event is open to youth between the ages of 7 and 14.

Participants aged 9-14 years will start the triathlon with a 100-yard swim at the Kona Community Aquatic Center, followed by a 3.2-mile bike ride and a 1-mile run within the Old Kona Airport Park complex.

Children 7-8 years old will race half those distances.

Persons interested in participating or needing additional information may call Officer Joseph Botelho Jr. in East Hawaiʻi at 961-8121, Officer Randy Morris in West Hawaiʻi at 326-4646, extension 258, or Darrell Yamamoto from the Department of Parks and Recreation at 961-8735.

The deadline to register is Friday, October 11.­­­­­

Sen. Hirono Takes to Senate Floor, Urges Passage of Bipartisan Bill Promoting Energy Efficiency and Job Creation

Yesterday, Senator Mazie K. Hirono took to the Senate floor in support of a bipartisan bill that would help promote energy efficiency in Hawaii and around the country.

Hirono Touts Hawaii’s Commitment To Sustainability & Energy Conservation As A National Model

Hirono Touts Hawaii’s Commitment To Sustainability & Energy Conservation As A National Model

The Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act would help states reduce our nation’s CO2 emissions while also saving taxpayers money by making the federal government more energy-efficient and supporting job creation and training in the commercial building design and operation industry. If signed into law, the bill is estimated to create 164,000 new jobs, yield net annual savings of $13.7 billion, and reduce CO2 emissions by 80.2 million metric tons in the next two decades.

“The policies in this bill make significant progress towards reducing energy costs for consumers and businesses, driving innovation, reducing environmental harm, and positioning the U.S. as a leader in clean energy technology and jobs,” Hirono said on the floor.

Hirono noted how Hawaii is uniquely affected by oil prices as the state most dependent on imported fossil fuel and touted Hawaii’s commitment to sustainability as a national model, highlighting how Hawaii received the Energy Services Coalition’s top award for energy efficiency.

“Hawaii has set some of the nation’s most aggressive goals for generating renewable energy, and improving energy efficiency,” Hirono said. “Thanks to the State of Hawaii’s commitment to improving energy efficiency, Hawaii is the nation’s number one user of energy savings performance contracts. In fact, just a few weeks ago the State of Hawaii was awarded the Energy Services Coalition’s “Race to the Top Award” which recognizes the State’s commitment to pursuing energy savings through performance contracting.”

[youtube=http://youtu.be/WUAFZUvvUoQ]

Hirono’s full remarks as prepared read below:

Mr. President, I want to speak for a few minutes in support of the bill currently before the Senate, S. 1392, the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act of 2013.
Continue reading

U.S. Department of Transportation Releases $236,277,358 in Federal Funds for Honolulu Rail Project

Today, Senator Schatz announced the release $236,277,358  in federal funds for the Honolulu Rail Transit project.  This U.S. Department of Transportation funding will be used to continue building Hawai‘i’s first light rail system.

The very first Honolulu Rail Column 45 (Copyright Iopa Maunakea use with permission only)

The very first Honolulu Rail Column (Copyright Iopa Maunakea use with permission only)

“Federal funding for the rail project continues to flow and we continue to receive assurance from the DOT and the FTA that it is full speed ahead,” said Senator Brian Schatz. “After 40 years in the making, the rail project is now quickly progressing and I will continue to work towards making a rail system in Hawai‘i a reality.”

Senator Schatz serves on the Surface Transportation Subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. Earlier this year, Senator Schatz met with Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and Federal Transit Administrator Pete Rogoff to receive their commitment to defend Honolulu rail transit’s funding.

 

Lahaina Bypass Receives 2013 Overall Grand Outstanding Civil Achievement Award

The Kahoma Stream Bridge in Lahaina, part of the Honoapiilani Highway Realignment Project, also known as the “Lahaina Bypass,” received the 2013 Overall Grand Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Hawaii Section, at a ceremony this past weekend.  The ASCE Hawaii Section annually recognizes an exemplary civil engineering project that best illustrates superior civil engineering skills and represents a significant contribution to civil engineering progress and society.

The new bridge, seen above under construction, utilizes an inverted tier arch design, which places arched support beams below the road surface rather than above.  This design was selected to minimize obstructions of ocean views for motorists and the Lahaina community.

The new bridge, seen above under construction, utilizes an inverted tier arch design, which places arched support beams below the road surface rather than above. This design was selected to minimize obstructions of ocean views for motorists and the Lahaina community.

“The Hawaii Department of Transportation and our Highways Division is honored to receive this very prestigious engineering award,” said state Department of Transportation Director Glenn Okimoto.  “Completion of this bridge was a key component in the first segment of the Lahaina Bypass, giving motorists a new alternate route to bypass the busiest section of Lahaina Town.”

Seen here after completion, the bridge design eliminates the need for foundation pillars below which leaves the Kahoma Stream unobstructed.

Seen here after completion, the bridge design eliminates the need for foundation pillars below which leaves the Kahoma Stream unobstructed.

The 360-foot, two-lane bridge structure, which spans the Kahoma Stream Gulch, utilizes an inverted tier arch design, which places support beams below the road surface rather than above.  This design was selected to minimize obstructions of ocean views for motorists and the Lahaina community.  The unique support beam design also eliminates the need for foundation pillars below the bridge which leaves the Kahoma Stream unobstructed.  Construction of the bridge was completed at an approximate cost of $24.3 million.

The project will now be submitted to the ASCE national competition for consideration against other construction projects nationwide.

Kauai’s South Shore Shearwater Colony Decimated By Dogs and Cats

State urges pet owners to help protect native birds, which aid local fisherman

A large colony of Hawaiian ‘ua‘u kani (wedge-tailed shearwaters) located along a coastal path on the south shore of Kaua‘i has been decimated in two attacks this summer by dogs and feral cats.

Shearwater killed in its coastal habitate. DOFAW photo

Shearwater killed in its coastal habitate. DOFAW photo

Recently, several more freshly killed birds were found in the area, suggesting that the colony is still being hit hard by dogs and cats. At the same time state biologists searching wedge-tailed shearwater burrows in the area known to have been active this year, found that the burrows were now abandoned, many with dead eggs inside.

Earlier, in July and August, more than 80 of the native seabirds (many of them actively breeding) have been found slaughtered in their nesting area. Injuries sustained by the birds showed that they were killed by dogs and feral cats.

“It appears that the entire colony in this area has been severely depleted, and it is likely that very few breeding birds now remain,” said Thomas Kaiakapu, Kaua‘i wildlife manager for the state Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW).

The wedge-tailed shearwater, also known as “matori” to local fishermen, is one of the more familiar seabirds on Kaua‘i, with large concentrations of the birds seen off shore in the late afternoon as they gather to return to nest sites at night. At this time of year, the birds are either sitting on eggs or raising very small chicks, making them particularly vulnerable to dogs and cats.

“Large feeding flocks of matori, or ‘ua‘u kani, help fishermen to locate feeding schools of tuna,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. “The birds use tuna to drive their prey (small fish and squid) to the surface where they can catch them. We ask that fishermen speak to their neighbors about keeping their dogs and cats under control so that these important friends to fishermen can survive.”

“There are signs placed along the south coast path asking dog owners to keep their dogs on leashes and their cats indoors. No matter how friendly or docile you think your dog may be, if it gets near a nesting seabird the dog will kill it – it’s as simple as that. We ask the general public to act responsibly in these areas with their pets to prevent similar instances from happening again.”

“While this large kill of shearwaters is particularly alarming, we unfortunately get reports of mass kills of this species every year on the island,” said Kaiakapu. “As these birds breed in dense colonies along the coast, they are particularly vulnerable to dogs that have been let off of their leashes or feral cat colonies located near the breeding areas.”

 

Honolulu Harbor Water Quality Appears to Be Returning to Normal Visual Conditions

Divers completed a survey of Honolulu Harbor in the immediate vicinity of the initial release and found no visible evidence of molasses, Tuesday.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class James Moore with the National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, prepares a water quality instrument used to monitor depleted oxygen and pH levels in the Honolulu Harbor, Honolulu, Sept. 15, 2013. Personnel from the Coast Guard, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tested the water at various locations around Honolulu Harbor affected by the molasses spill. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Molle)

The dive survey covered an area on the bottom of the harbor of approximately 200 feet surrounding the source of the initial spill. The diver investigated the areas under the pier around the pilings and along the seabed out into the harbor.

“The seabed under the wharf and into the channel was observed to be in normal condition, with no pools or visual evidence of molasses,” Kevin Foster, U.S. Fish and Wildlife marine ecology specialist. “The consensus was that the molasses is no longer in the area.”

The dive included a live video feed to the surface where representatives from the Department of Land and Natural Resources and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service directed and observed the nearly two hour survey.

Water quality appears to be returning to normal visual conditions. Water sampling and testing continues in the harbor and Keehi Lagoon.

Missile Defense System Intercepts Target in Test Off Kauai

The Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Pacific Command and sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie conducted a successful flight test today of the Aegis ballistic missile defense system, intercepting a ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean.

An SM-3 Block 1B interceptor is launched from the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. The Lake Erie-launched missile successfully intercepted a complex short-range ballistic missile target. (U.S. Navy photo) Click to Enlarge

An SM-3 Block 1B interceptor is launched from the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. The Lake Erie-launched missile successfully intercepted a complex short-range ballistic missile target. (U.S. Navy photo) Click to Enlarge

A complex separating short-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii, and flew northwest toward a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean. The USS Lake Erie detected and tracked the missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, developed a fire control solution and launched two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles to engage the target.

The first SM-3 that was launched successfully intercepted the target warhead. This was the first salvo mission of two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles launched against a single separating target, officials said, adding that they will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

The test exercised the latest version of the second-generation Aegis BMD Weapon System, capable of engaging longer-range and more sophisticated ballistic missiles, officials said. This was an operationally realistic test, as the target’s launch time and bearing are not known in advance, they added, and the target complex was the most difficult target engaged to date.

This was the fourth consecutive successful intercept test of the SM-3 Block IB guided missile with the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and the 27th successful intercept in 33 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002.

Across all Ballistic Missile Defense System programs, this is the 63rd successful hit-to-kill intercept in 79 flight test attempts since 2001.

8th Annual Moku O Keawe Internatiol Hula Festivital Moves to Hilton Waikoloa Village

With a new location and a refreshed attitude for an upbeat economy, the 8th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival will take place November 7-9, 2013 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.  Three exciting nights of top international hula competition, an expanded Made-in-Hawai‘i Marketplace and unique Hawaiian cultural workshops make Moku O Keawe a winning choice for the classic Hawai‘i Island resort setting.

Leiomalama Soloman of Beamer Solomon Halau o Po'ohala, last year's MOK solo winner.

Leiomalama Soloman of Beamer Solomon Halau o Po’ohala, last year’s MOK solo winner.

International competition.   Moku O Keawe brings together hālau from Hawai‘i, Japan, Mexico, the U.S. Mainland and elsewhere with high-caliber hula competition in Hula Kahiko, Hula ‘Auwana, and Kupuna divisions, group and solo.  Competition nights feature live music onstage and Mistress of Ceremonies, KAPA radio personality Ka‘ea Alapa‘i.

Halau Na Pua 'Uluhaimalama peforms a hula noho during the 2012 MOKIF competition.

Halau Na Pua ‘Uluhaimalama peforms a hula noho during the 2012 MOKIF competition.

Cultural Workshops.   Essential to the Festival is the element of Hawaiian cultural education through a series of hands-on workshops, presented by the competition judges in their chosen fields of expertise.  Dance workshops include hula kahiko and ‘auwana by pre-eminent Nā Kumu Hula such as Nani Lim Yap, Nalani Kanaka‘ole, Iwalani Kalima, Cy Bridges, Chinky Mahoe and others.  The arts of hula are explored in-depth, with workshops such as lau hala weaving, crafting shell lei, and an excursion to Kalaemano (near Hualālai Resort) with Ku‘ulei Keakealani.

Workshops will also be held.

Workshops will also be held.

Made-in-Hawai‘i Marketplace.  Featuring a wide variety of some of the best products from over 50 Island of Hawai‘i vendors, the new Marketplace at Hilton Hawaiian Village will showcase Hula implements, fresh lei, silk-screened clothing, woven lauhala hats and purses, food products, fine arts, jewelry, fragrance, soaps and more.

Hilton Waikoloa Village

“We are very grateful to the Hilton for reaching out to us with their support,” said Moku O Keawe Board Advisor Sherron Rosenberger “It became clear that we had to make a change in order to keep our Festival going strong and focused on the future.  By hosting everything in one location, the Hilton has provided a way to continue our mission to perpetuate hula, the arts of hula and Hawaiian culture with the local community and our visitors from near and far.”

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts.  For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com

Volunteers Sought for 24th Annual Light Up a Life

Hospice of Hilo is looking for volunteers to help with its 24th annual Light Up a Life hosted by Macy’s at the Prince Kuhio Plaza from November 23 to December 24.

Hospice of Hilo honored it's volunteers last week.

Hospice of Hilo honored it’s volunteers

“Each year, during the holiday season, we set up a Tree of Remembrance at each of the two Macy’s entrances in the mall to allow the community to honor loved ones by hanging a personalized commemorative ornament on the tree,” said Hospice of Hilo Volunteer Manager, Pearl Lyman.  She continues, “The ornaments are a symbolic connection with our loved ones and a reminder that they remain alive in our hearts.”

Community volunteers are needed to provide support at the tables from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and are scheduled to provide service in 2-3 hour shifts. “Volunteers are a vital to the Annual Light Up a Life, for over 23 years they have been at the tables helping with ornaments, being caring hearts, listening to stories and honoring the memories of loved ones in our community.  We couldn’t do it without these wonderful people,” said Lyman.

Please call Pearl Lyman at 969-1733 to volunteer your time at any one of the Trees of Remembrance.