Press Conference Tomorrow on the HAAS School Bus Issue

Hawaii Department of Education will no longer allow *HAAS* charter school children to ride on their school buses.  Sixty students from Hawaii Academy of Arts and Science are affected by this DOE decision.
Students at HAAS Rally for Mazie Hirono

Students at HAAS Rally for Mazie Hirono

DOE informed HAAS Principal Steve Hirakami of the decision today, Friday, Aug. 2.
Ten of those displaced children are special needs students, and one of them is a federally protected McKinney-Vento student.
Attend a 1 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 4 press conference at HAAS, 15-1397 Homestead Road, for more details. Or, contact HAAS principal Steve Hirakami via cell at (808)640-7901.

 

Update on the Human Remains Found on Mauna Kea

Around noon on Tuesday, July 30, a Native Hawaiian Cultural Hiking group (Huaka’i I Na ‘Aina Mauna – Those who travel or explore the High Altitude Lands) on a “huaka’i” (trip or pilgrimage with cultural, environmental and spiritual components), located human remains that may resolve the mystery of a male hiker missing since 2007.

Image from a NASA Expedition I did back in 2009

Image from a NASA Expedition I did back in 2009

The team of hikers traveling near the summit of Mauna Kea about half a mile from 13,000 foot elevation Lake Wai’au (a “wahi pana” or sacred site), came across bones scattered over an extended area. A physician among the group, Dr. Baron Kaho’ola Ching, M.D., realized the bones were not from animals known to frequent the area. Then a collar bone and pelvic bone was found, the latter included an artificial hip replacement.

When the group realized it was human remains, a Hawaiian elegy (uwe) prayer was performed for the deceased. There is hope among the Hawaiian cultural practitioners that there will eventually be a proper burial for the person and peace and closure for the family. A group member made calls notifying the authorities, who will visit the site on Friday, August 2. The remains were left undisturbed as the group continued with their huaka’i, with deeper reverence for Mauna a Wakea. The group will continue its activities on the mountain through Saturday, August 3.

A member of KAHEA: The Hawaiian-Environmental Alliance Board of Directors was also among the cultural participants.

 

Palace Event Remembers King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli”

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, August 18 to remember the late King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli.” The fun is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures.

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862. Keywords: Royalty Description: Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma. Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince. Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862.
Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma.
Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince.
Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. Donations are appreciated; kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

“Born in 1813, Kauikeaouli was the second surviving son of Kamehameha the Great and he became king when he was 11 years old,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “During his 30-year reign, he signed the Great Mahele, dividing land among his people; declared the right of religious freedom and instituted the kingdom’s first written constitution.”

In 1843, King Kamehameha III coined Hawai‘i’s motto that appears on the state seal and coat of arms: “`Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono-the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.” The monarch was born at Keauhou Bay and a plaque there marks the birth site.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.