The Fastest Sailing Ship in the World, The Pallada, Coming to Hawaii

The Pallada is on it’s way to Hawaii!

Russian sailing vessel Pallada has left the city of Los Angeles in California for Honolulu (Hawaii), the ship’s owner said.

The ship, carrying over 100 cadets from Russia’s Far Eastern Primorye and Kamchatka territories, sailed from the city of Vladivostok on July 1. During the four-month expedition, the Pallada will call at ports in the United States, Canada and Japan.

The trip is dedicated to the 50th anniversary of Soviet cosmonaut Yury Gagarin’s space flight and the 270th anniversary of the discovery of “Russian America” by Russian seafarers…

…The Pallada’s next destination is Honolulu, where the ship will spend three days filled with a variety of cultural exchange events.

The Pallada was built in 1989 in Poland.

In its 22-year history, the Pallada has sailed for 12 years, called at 101 ports in 35 countries and trained 12,000 cadets, midshipmen and students from all over Russia.

Guinness World Records lists the Pallada as the fastest sailing ship in the world. The vessel can reach speeds in excess of 18 knots.

Pallada

Russian sailing vessel Pallada underway (Photo Сourtesy of Far Eastern Technical Fishing University (Dalrybvtuz))

More Here: Russian Sailing Ship Pallada Leaves Los Angeles for Honolulu

3 Responses

  1. Guinness World Records lists the Pallada as the fastest sailing ship in the world. The vessel can reach speeds in excess of 18 knots.

  2. Wha? 18 knots? Pathetic. Not even close to the fastest. Compare to the Hydroptere, which goes over 50 knots.

    Now SHE is fast.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydropt%C3%A8re

    • Yes, but the Pallada looks like she could actually carry cargo or passengers. If she were built in the 1800s, she could have been a profitable merchant ship carrying silk, spices and opium. The Hydroptère is just a fancy yacht designed do go as fast as possible without any useful function, but the Pallada looks like she could actually have done legitimate, useful work as a commercial vessel in the 19th century.

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