Hawaii Community Foundation Sponsors “East Hawaii Fund” Grant Opportunities

Media Release:

A new resource has been established for the people and communities of East Hawai’i, from Waipi’o to Waiohinu. With the help of KTA Superstores, the estate of Frederick Yokoyama and a group of local citizens serving as an advisory committee, the East Hawai’i Fund was established to provide a stronger link between charitable donors and the specific needs of East Hawai’i.

This regional fund will continue to grow through contributions, bequests and planned gifts from donors who want to respond to current and emerging community needs. The East Hawai’i Fund is a component fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation, a statewide, publicly supported grantmaking foundation.

Hawaii Community Foundation

“This fund is being created by our community, for our community,” said Barry Taniguchi, president and CEO of KTA Superstores. “It’s a way that individuals, families and businesses can give back to the community that we all care about. The East Hawai’i Fund reflects our community values and our belief in the future. We encourage the community to learn more about this new resource.”

Applications are currently being accepted by East Hawai’i nonprofit organizations. The deadline to apply is September 1, 2011. The East Hawai’i Fund especially welcomes proposals that involve people and organizations from different sectors of the community who are working together to address an issue of concern to the community. Preference will be given to projects that address one or more of the following areas:

  • Educational opportunities with an emphasis on early childhood, after school/out-of-school experiential opportunities for youth, and/or preparedness for education and career success
  • Strengthening intergenerational relationships
  • Economic sufficiency for self, family and community
  • Family-centered and integrative approaches to health care
  • Social conditions such as poverty, domestic violence, substance abuse or crime
  • Recreational opportunities with an emphasis on family and/or intergenerational activities

To be eligible for a grant of more than $2,500, a group must be a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization – such as schools, units of government or neighborhood groups – or have a 501(c)(3) fiscal sponsor and clearly demonstrate a program or project’s benefit to the East Hawai’i community. Community organizations without 501(c)(3) status are eligible to apply for a grant up to $2,500, provided the activities to be supported are charitable.

Grants awarded will range between $1,000 to $8,000 and organizations may apply for up to two consecutive years of funding, however the East Hawai’i Fund will not make multi-year commitments.

Proposal information is available at www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org . All proposals should be mailed to Hawaii Community Foundation, Attention: East Hawaii Fund, 827 Fort Street Mall, Honolulu, HI 96813 and must be post-marked on or before September 1, 2011.

California Man Dies From Fall While Riding His Bicycle Drunk

Media Release:

A California man has died from injuries sustained when he fell off his bicycle.

On July 14, Kona patrol officers responded to a 1:18 a.m. report of a crashing sound on the 75-6100 block of Alii Drive and found a man lying next to a bicycle.

The victim, identified as 24-year-old Anthony Hernandez of Simi Valley, California, had been riding the bike when he lost control, fell and struck his head on the pavement. He was not wearing a helmet.

Fire-rescue personnel took him to Kona Community Hospital in critical condition with head and face injuries. He was then transferred to The Queen’s Medical Center on Oahu.

Police initiated a public accident case and a driving under the influence of intoxicants case.

Hernandez was pronounced dead at Queen’s at 9:07 a.m. Sunday (July 17).

Wordless Wednesday: Chief… The Movie

Named “one of the 10 must-see short films of Sundance” by IndieWIRE, CHIEF tells the story of Semu Fatutoa, a taxi driver in Honolulu, Hawaii. Once he was a village Chief in Samoa, but tragedy compelled him to cover his tattoos and flee his home. Now he drives in circles, slowly forgetting his old life. But his old life is looking for him. CHIEF won “Best Dramatic Short” at the Los Angeles International Short Film Festival, a BAFTA award, and several other festival accolades.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/MCJ-_R_X_tM]

To own CHIEF on DVD, including more than 90 minutes of behind-the-scenes footage, interviews, and other bonus materials, visit www.CHIEF-MOVIE.com.

Hawaii Nun’s Cause for Sainthood Jumps Forward with Second Miracle

Media Release:

The cause for sainthood of Blessed Hawaiian nun Marianne Cope has received Vatican approval of a second miracle. A group of doctors from the Vatican’s Congregation for Causes of Saints declared there is no medical explanation for the cure of a woman who was on her deathbed and made a miraculous recovery.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vllAhBY2pA4]

No other details on the case have been released.

Mother Marianne in 1883, shortly before coming to Hawaii.

Before moving to Hawaii in 1883 to help care for those suffering with leprosy, Marianne Cope worked as a member of the Sisters of St. Francis in Syracuse, New York. Her cause for beatification has been taken up there.

The miracle approved on June 16 must undergo two more examinations by theologians and a group of cardinals before being presented to the pope for approval. She could then be declared a saint.

WestJet to Resume Seasonal Flights to Hawaii From Canada

Back in October of 2009 I posted that WestJet Airlines was going to start up an eight week run of flights between Canada and Hawaii.

WestJet to resume seasonal flights to Hawaii

Airlines and Destinations is now reporting that the flights are going to resume on a seasonal basis:

…This winter WestJet is also resuming its non-stop seasonal service to Hawaii from Calgary and Edmonton. The airline says it will announce details of the services at a later date…

Japanese Tea Ceremony for Peace Held on USS Arizona Memorial

Media Release:

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th grand tea master of the Urasenke School of Tea, performed a sacred Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial at the World War II Valor of the Pacific National Monument, July 19.

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th grand tea master of the Urasenke School of Tea, prepares sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

More than 200 Japanese and American guests gathered at the USS Arizona Memorial to witness Sen perform the centuries old tea ceremony. Due to the limited space, more than 300 attendees watched the event unfold at the World War II Valor of the Pacific National Monument theaters.

Guests and attendees applaud Pearl Harbor survivors Alfred Rodriguez, Ray Emory and Sterling Cale at a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in a spirit of respect, reconciliation and peace. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

In the spirit of reconciliation and peace, Sen, a veteran of WWII, dedicated a bowl of tea to the 1,177 deceased who are memorialized in the Shrine Room. The ceremony, also known as “Okenchashiki,” is a sacred tea ceremony to the spirits of the war dead for world peace, conducted without words or music, allows for all participants, regardless of language, nationality or religious beliefs, to share in a spiritual communion together.

Japanese guests listen to the interpreter during a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument to honor the men who died on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

“There’s a wonderful phrase in Japanese when translated means ‘One time, one chance, one time, one situation, one opportunity,” said Sen, through an interpreter. “Today, this sacred tea ceremony was important on many different levels. It was an offering of sacred tea to the souls who are lost on the USS Arizona. On another level, it was an apology of sorts, a deep regret of the incident and war. The third important message was ‘world peace’ that we all came together at a hallowed place in this sacred opportunity to pray for world peace.”

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, prepares sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Sen, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument to honor the men who died on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

During WWII, Sen was a pilot for the Japanese Navy who flew missions off the coast of Okinawa. As a veteran, Sen said the expeience made him truly believe the horrific nature of war.

“War is horrible,” said Sen. “But I also realize that one person alone cannot stop a war. We must all work together to stop war.”

Since 1950, Sen has visited more than 60 countries promoting the Japanese culture and performing tea ceremonies around the world. Sen has performed the tea ceremony for world figures such as First Lady Laura Bush, Princess Diana, former Premier of Russia, Gorbachov, and former Vice President Al Gore.

Adm. Patrick Walsh, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, speaks at a Japanese tea ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico)

Attendees of the ceremony on the USS Arizona Memorial included Pearl Harbor survivors Alfred Rogriguez, Sterling Cale and Ray Emory; Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Adm. Patrick Walsh; Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo of Japan; Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie; Pacific West Regional Director Christine Lenertz of the National Park Service; former Hawaii Gov. George Ariyoshi; and other dignitaries. The event was chaired by former First Lady of Hawaii, Jean Ariyoshi.

“I’m happy to have been invited to the tea ceremony,” said 89-year-old Cale. “It’s a good thing. I’m honored. I met a lot of people who I would not have met otherwise.”

Sixty-five years after the end of WWII, the United States and Japan have formed a new bilateral relationship of harmony and economic friendship.

Dr. Genshitsu Sen, the 15th Grand Teamaster of the Urasenke School of Tea, offers sacred tea to honor the deceased entombed at the USS Arizona Memorial. The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy, led by Sen, hosted a sacred tea ceremony at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument in a spirit of respect, reconciliation and peace. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Mark Logico/RELEASED)

“Through this sacred ceremony on this hallowed setting, we honor the sacrifices of an extraordinary generation, which made possible the gift of peace to generations that followed,” said Walsh. “Today, our quintessential gifts have been the opportunity for a proud, strong relationship with our counterparts from the Japan Self-Defense Force.

“Earlier this year we learned about our strength and the endurance of our friendship. In times of crisis, in an hour of tragedy, at the moment of calamity, we learned about ourselves and the brotherhood of humanity,” said Walsh. “If history ever records a time and a place to learn about the commitment we make to our fellow man, it would be Japan in the days that followed March 11, 2011 where more people came to offer assistance than departed to avoid damage caused by the earthquake, tsunami and radioactive contamination.”