On Stage with “The Green”

The winners of the Reggae Album of the Year for the 34th Annual Na Hoku Hanohano Awards was the group “The Green“.

"The Green" - 2011 Na Hoku Hanohano Award Winner Reggae Album of the Year

It just happens to be that “The Green” is my favorite group right now so I was thrilled to hear that they would be performing at the Na Hoku Hanohano Awards.

Performing at the Awards Ceremony

They rocked the Convention Center that night!

Side view of their performance at the Na Hoku Hanohano Awards

What many folks might not know, is The Green’s self-titled debut album was named iTunes Best Reggae Album of 2010!

The Green

Well I was fortunate enough to be allowed into the Convention Centers Main Ballroom at 3:30 for their sound check and that was a hoot!

The Green Sound Check

I asked lead singer Caleb Keolanui if I could come on stage and he said come on up!

On Stage with The Green

They played some chords while the sound folks at the convention center tweaked the audio so that it would be the best it could be for both the television audience as well as the live audience.

Sound Check with The Green

The Green then busted out a couple songs for just the few folks that were in the room at the time.

Sound Check

This was the second time that I’ve gotten to check out The Green in person.

On Stage with The Green

Later in the evening after the Na Hoku Hanohano Awards were over… members of The Green were spotted at The Shack in Waikiki for an after party that I’ll be posting about soon enough.

Caleb Keolanui enjoys a cold one at The Shack

I’d like to thank The Green for allowing me access to their sound check and for just being a great band in general.

You can click on the pictures below for a larger view.

Big Island Police Seeking Man Wanted for Sex Assault on Female Minor

Media Release:

Big Island police are requesting the public’s help in identifying and locating a man wanted for questioning in connection with a sexual assault of a female minor. The assault occurred on October 1, 2010, between 7 and 7:30 p.m. in Kurtistown in the Puna District.

Artist Rendition

The man is described as local, “scruffy” looking, 18-30 years old, 5-feet-7 to 5-feet 9, 150 to 175 pounds with a medium build, brown eyes, short buzz-cut black hair and a dark complexion. He was last seen wearing a blue aloha shirt with blue hibiscus print and driving a gold or light-colored four door Honda or Mazda sedan.

Detectives with the Juvenile Aid Section are continuing this investigation.

Police ask that anyone with information on his identity or location call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Cockfight Raided in Ka’u… 150 on Site 5 Arrested

Media Release:

Five men were arrested Sunday (May 29) at a cockfight in Ka’ū.

(Click image to see larger view.)
Mug shot image of Takahashi Mug shot image of Sakata Mug shot image of Mattos Mug shot image of Gonzales
Patrick Takahashi Keldon Sakata Donovan Mattos Modesto Gonzales Edward Polido

Officers from the Area II Vice Section—assisted by detectives from the Area II Juvenile Aid and Criminal Investigations sections, the Area I Vice Section and the Criminal Intelligence Unit—served a search warrant shortly after noon Sunday at a macadamia nut orchard in Pāhala, where the cockfight was taking place.

Police observed 75 vehicles and about 150 people at the site. Officers located 20 dead roosters and recovered injured roosters, rooster boxes, gaffs, paraphernalia related to cockfighting and gambling records related to cockfighting. In addition, police seized $7,737 in cash for forfeiture.

The five men below were arrested and charged with the following offenses:

  • Patrick Takahashi, 31, of Waipahu with cruelty to animals, gambling and possessing gambling records
  • Keldon Sakata, 31, of Pāhala with three counts of cruelty to animals
  • Donovan Mattos, 37, of Nā’ālehu with two counts of cruelty to animals
  • Modesto Gonzales, 69, of Ocean View with two counts of cruelty to animals
  • Edward Polido, 51, of Pāhala with gambling and possessing gambling records

Lieutenant Sherry Bird from the Area II Vice Section is urging the public to help prevent animal cruelty by reporting information about cockfights. “This time of year is considered cockfighting season,” she said, “but cockfighting is illegal.”

Persons with information about illegal cockfighting may call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or the Vice hotlines at 329-0423 in Kona or 934-8423 in Hilo. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Searching for 57 Year Old Man Missing Since Februrary

Media Release:

Big Island police are searching for a 57-year-old Hilo man who was reported missing.

Robert Dalpe

Robert Dalpe missing since February

Robert Dalpe, who has no permanent address, frequents the Hilo area. His family last heard from him in February.

He is described as Caucasian, 6-foot-1 about 150 pounds with blue eyes and brown hair.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona.

2011 Hawaii Community College 70th Commencement… Student Interviews

Graduates discus their plans after graduation, their learning experience, and advice for those considering enrollment at Hawai’i Community College. Graduates interviewed:

  • Melissa Nakayama – Electrical Installation and Maintenance Technology
  • Kealaka’i Thomas Matsumoto – Liberal Arts, Human Services
  • Denyse N. Kuupuaimohalaikalani Woo-Ockerman – Marketing

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMKqug9rUh8]

Summer of Love… Anuhea Jenkins Coming to Pahoa!

This past week I spent some time on Oahu doing my best trying to convince musicians from the State of Hawaii to come play on the Big Island.

Anuhea at the 2010 Na Hoku Hanohano Awards

I was pleasantly surprised when I asked 2010 Na Hoku Hanohano Award Winner Anuhea Jenkins when she would come to the Big Island again and in particular come to Pahoa and she stated “I’m Coming to Pahoa on Sunday, July 3rd at the Akebono Theater

Anuhea and The Green at the 2010 Na Hoku Hanohano Awards

Anuhea and The Green at the 2010 Na Hoku Hanohano Awards

Of course Anuhea is one of my favorite artists right now… so I’ll be sure to be there!

Summer of Love Tour UNPLUGGED

At : Akebono Theater
KWXX Radio presents: Anuhea Summer of Love Tour, Pahoa
Anuhea performs acoustic style at the Akebono Theater in Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii.
More info TBA!

I Can Handle Coqui Frogs… But Keep Them Damn Snakes Out of Hawaii

Media Release:

It was one of the first evening classes since arriving in Guam. Suddenly there was a snake, just six inches away, tongue out, staring coldly into his eyes. Raymond McGuire, Hawaii Division of Forestry and Wildlife’s coqui control coordinator, later realized his work capturing coqui frogs on the Big Island had helped him spot the Brown Tree Snake (BTS) which can be nearly invisible outdoors.

Raymond Pulling a snake out of his trap

Raymond Pulling a snake out of his trap

McGuire was one of nine Pacific island-based personnel, including several from Hawaii Invasive Species Committees, sent to Guam for a three-week training led by James Stanford, BTS rapid response coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey.

According to Page Else, Big Island Invasive Species Committee public outreach specialist, the impact of the Brown Tree Snake — which first invaded Guam in WWII — has been very costly to that island territory’s economic, ecological and social environment. She added it would cause similar problems for Hawaii.

A snake

A snake

“These snakes are frequent flyers and somehow know to crawl into airplane wheel wells or cargo holds. Without constant airport inspections, Hawaii is sure to be infiltrated,” Else said recently. “Snake populations would rapidly establish in Hawaii, with rats, mice, birds and lizards as plentiful food sources. The threat is even more of a concern now due to the military base buildup on Guam and the current constraints on government budgets.”

Christy Leppanen, until recently the Honolulu-based state Department of Land and Natural Resources’ invasive species specialist, is the newly appointed Invasive Species Biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This summer, she will be moving to Saipan to make sure, as Leppanen tells it, “the Brown Tree Snake doesn’t make it to Hawaii.”

Leppanen joined McGuire and Shawn Okumura of the Big Island Invasive Species Committee in the BTS training in Guam. McGuire and Okumura said they felt the training was worthwhile, although arduous. The students received daily classroom instruction in the mornings and four hours each night of field training in finding and capturing the BTS.

The first night in the field, a small snake bit into Shawn's leather glove

The first night in the field, a small snake bit into Shawn's leather glove

During the evening field session, the participants entered snake enclosures full of vegetation and trees to count the number of snakes. Initially, McGuire found it hard to coax himself to grab the snakes without hesitation. The duration of three weeks’ training helped him conquer that challenge. He learned to use the snakes’ scales and coloring as cues. The BTS’s scales shimmered in the light and sometimes – but not always – their eyes shined. BTS can vary in color from olive to dark brown and the older snakes often have yellow bellies.

By the end of the three weeks of training, McGuire had caught 15 snakes with hand tools and many more in traps. Okumura earned the record for most hand-captured snakes in one evening: seven.

Shawn and his large snake

Shawn and his large snake

Trapped BTS were bad-tempered, according to McGuire. Each participant was responsible for 10 traps that they checked every other day. The density of Guam’s BTS population became apparent as the group captured 70 snakes from a three-acre parcel one night, only to return two days later and capture another 60.

Working in teams of two, the participants learned to maneuver the snakes without frightening them, coaxing them onto branches where they could be captured. One trick they were taught was to thump a tree to get the BTS to descend from the upper branches.

Gurney Amore and Shawn Okumura holding a large snake

Gurney Amore and Shawn Okumura holding a large snake

According to the trainer, BTS are only mildly venomous and are not aggressive in the wild but quickly realize when they are being hunted. For children, a bite can result in a hospital visit but adults are usually not affected, the trainer said.

Okumura and McGuire deliberately allowed themselves to get bit, to make sure they were not allergic. “It didn’t hurt, even though the snakes try hard and chew strongly,” McGuire reported.

Obviously, the BTS is a potential threat to Hawaii’s environment but it is not the only reptilian threat, according to Else. Other snake species have been smuggled into Hawaii, despite it being against the law to do so. “Many people do not understand the impact snake populations could pose to our economy and ecosystems,” Else said. “It is illegal to bring a snake into the state but there have been over 300 credible snake sightings in the past 25 years, with only 100 recovered.”

The BIISC representative in Hilo said that designated state and federal employees continue to train and guard Hawaii against invasion by snakes and other biological threats. “We’re glad to have our ‘snake warriors’ ready to protect our island,” she said.

She then urged anyone who spots a snake to immediately call the Big Island Invasive Species Committee hotline at 961-3299 or the state Division of Forestry and Wildlife at 974-4221