Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Events for July

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in July. All programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Making lei at last year's Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Making lei at last year’s Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Ulana Lauhala. Learn to weave a decorative star from leaves of the pandanus tree. Lau hala are used to create a wide array of attractive, useful, and traditional Hawaiian arts and crafts. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., July 9, from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Cultural Festival in Kahuku. The 34th annual Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival will be held in Kahuku this year.  Enjoy hula kāhiko and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. Taste traditional, ono Hawaiian foods. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair, plus sunscreen and a hat. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This is a family-friendly, drug- and alcohol-free event. The Kahuku unit is the southernmost section of the national park, and is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5. Free entry and free parking. Sponsors include Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Ka‘ū Hawaiian Civic Club, Kīlauea Military Camp, and our sister parks in West Hawai‘i. Call 808-985-6011 or email havo_interpretation@nps.gov for more information.
When: Sat., July 12, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Kahuku

Hula Performance. Visiting from Honolulu, the ladies of Hālau Hula Kamamolikolehua, under the direction of kumu hula Pōhai Souza, share hula ‘auana (modern hula) at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Also sharing the stage are Hālau Hula Kalehuapuakea, with kumu hula Keu Ostrem, and Hālau Hula Kamaluokukui, under the direction of kumu hula Malina Kaulukukui. Music performed by Kualoa, featuring Kula Abiva and Pokiʻi Vaughan. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 15, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Untold Story

The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i. While the story of the 1942 mass round-up, eviction and imprisonment of Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington has been well documented, very little is known about the Hawai‘i internees and their unique experience during World War II. This is the first full-length documentary to chronicle this untold story in Hawai‘i’s history. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 29, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Landslide Closes Part of Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was closed past Kealakomo today due to large landslide:

Photo via NPS.

Photo via NPS.

Count Humpback Whales from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park encourages volunteers to register to help count humpback whales during the 2014 Sanctuary Ocean Count held the last Saturday of January, February and March (Jan. 25, Feb. 22, and Mar. 29), from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

umpback whale seen offshore near the end of Chain of Craters Road, January 2014. Image courtesy of Thomas C. Stein

Humpback whale seen offshore near the end of Chain of Craters Road, January 2014. Image courtesy of Thomas C. Stein

Ka‘ena Point, located at the end of Chain of Craters Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, is one of Hawai‘i Island’s 21 Sanctuary Ocean Count sites. Volunteers on shore monitor humpbacks in nearshore waters for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary. Residents and visitors look forward to this yearly event which provides important population and distribution information about humpback whales around the Hawaiian Islands.

The Sanctuary Ocean Count is an ideal opportunity for the community and the park to work together as stewards of the ocean. These splendid creatures swim more than 2,000 miles to Hawai‘i from Arctic waters every winter, and the annual count is one way to observe and record their behavior and ensure their future.

For more information, visit www.hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov. To register online, visit www.sanctuaryoceancount.org. For any additional questions please call the Ocean Count Hotline 808-268-3087.

Registered volunteers meet Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park volunteer and Sanctuary Ocean Count site leader Jennifer Watson at the end of Chain of Craters Road on the scheduled count days.

Volcanoes National Park “After Dark in the Park” for January

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone: 31 Years and Still Erupting. Jan. 3, 2014, marks the 31st anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea.

NPS Photo

NPS Photo

Although the eruption has produced dramatic lava flows in past years, it has been relatively subdued in recent years, with mostly steady, but unusually weak, activity. Tim Orr, a geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review highlights from the past 31 years and talk about recent developments on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 7 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Traditional Lei Making. Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia is a kumu hula, or teacher of hula. He has taught his students at Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu since 1996, where lei making is a vital and important part of their tradition. Join Ab and his wife Puamae‘ole  O’Mahoney as they continue to teach traditional lei making. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 8, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Happenings in Halema‘uma‘u: An Update on Kīlauea Volcano’s Summit Eruption. In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that is now 520’ x 690’ in size. While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, the volcano’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an update on Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption, including an overview of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 14, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kai Ho‘opi‘i in Concert. Come enjoy an evening of Hawaiian music, through the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ‘ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai is a winner of the Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto signing contest. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 15 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking events at Kāpoho and Halema‘uma‘u in 1924. In April 1924, Kāpoho residents were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village.  In the weeks that followed, huge explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, Ben Gaddis, a long-time HVO volunteer, will tell the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s most violent eruption of the 20th century from the perspective of the people who lived through it. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 21 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kapa Kuiki: Traditional Hawaiian Quilting. Cyndy Leinani Martinez has been practicing the art of kapa kuiki since she was old enough to hold a needle, learning from her mother and grandmother about the family craft. Always passionate, Cyndy has kept the family traditions alive for more than 60 years, and is now president of the quilting club in Waimea. Join this experienced, third generation quilter as she shares the traditional art of Hawaiian quilting.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 22, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Decades of Degassing at Kīlauea: Wake Up and Smell the Coughing! As magma rises from the Earth’s mantle to the surface, the expansion of volcanic gases drives the spectacular lava fountains and flows erupted by Hawaiian volcanoes.  While Kīlauea still produces picturesque lava flows from its East Rift Zone, and its summit crater hosts a dynamic lava pond, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases which have negatively impacted downwind communities, agriculture, and infrastructure for years. Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geochemists, will offer an update about these gases, especially those related to the 2008‐2013 activity at Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and will talk about volcanic pollution (vog)—how it forms and what we’ve learned about its effects on our island environment. An optional “gas- tasting” party will follow the talk. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 28 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory Update

Continuing the same trend of activity observed over the past few weeks, the active breakouts on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow are still slowly advancing into the forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, creating small vegetation fires.

Kahaualeʻa 2 flow still active in forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Kahaualeʻa 2 flow still active in forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This thermal image looks northeast from Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and shows how the subsurface lava tubes feeding the active breakouts on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow are clearly visible as lines of slightly higher temperatures on the surface.

At the bottom of the image, the lava tube coming from Puʻu ʻŌʻō forks, with the eastern branch supplying lava to the main area of active breakouts (5 km, or about 3 miles, northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō) and the western branch feeding a small area of breakouts about 2 km (1.2 miles) north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

At the bottom of the image, the lava tube coming from Puʻu ʻŌʻō forks, with the eastern branch supplying lava to the main area of active breakouts (5 km, or about 3 miles, northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō) and the western branch feeding a small area of breakouts about 2 km (1.2 miles) north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

 

 

Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Hosts Next Forest Restoration Project

The Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park hosts our next volunteer FOREST RESTORATION PROJECT on Friday, July 19, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Ranger Corie Yanger planting in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park - Credit: FHVNP

Ranger Corie Yanger planting in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park – Credit: FHVNP

This month we will be planting native trees in 1 to 3 gallon pots in the Kilauea section of the park. The area where we work and the species planted will be dependent on how much rain has been received by possible planting sites. We will also learn about the park’s native forest restoration program.

Volunteers should be at least 12 years old, and be able to walk up to 1/2 mile over uneven terrain with a moderate slope. Sturdy walking shoes and long pants are required, along with gear for variable weather conditions (be prepared for sun or rain with a hat, raincoat, sunscreen, etc.) plus drinking water and a snack.

In addition, imperative is scrubbing the soles of one’s shoes prior to arrival on site, in order to ensure outside dirt and invasive species seeds are not tracked in.

Our goal is a crew of 12 people, and pre-registration is required. All participants will need to sign a Friends release form and a park volunteer form. For those under 18, an adult will need to co-sign.

Be aware that there can be VOG or high levels of SO2 in the area. If it is too heavy or the park is closed, we will cancel the project and try to notify everyone in advance.

***If you are interested in volunteering, please contact the Friends at forest@fhvnp.org or call the office at (808)985-7373 by Wednesday evening, July 17. Please include your first and last name, email address, and a phone number where we can reach you at the last minute in case of cancellation***

 

 

Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Hosts Silent Auction After Volcano Parade

On Thursday, July 4 from 9:00 am to 11:30 am, Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park hosts its Silent Auction after the Volcano parade.

Join us July 4 from 9:00 – 11:30 am for FHVNP’s Silent Auction after the Volcano Parade.

Join us July 4 from 9:00 – 11:30 am for FHVNP’s Silent Auction after the Volcano Parade.

The auction, held at the Cooper Center in Volcano will benefit Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the Volcano Community Association and the Cooper Center.

This year, we have over 200 items up for auction – Fine art, vacation packages, jewelry, helicopter tours and so much more.

Please join us directly after the Volcano Parade.

 

Volunteer Forest Restoration Project

The Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park hosts our next volunteer FOREST RESTORATION PROJECT on Saturday, June 15, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

For June we be working in an area of Ohia forest that has been invaded by Kahili ginger. We will be cutting the ginger back so that it can be treated by the park’s weed management crew.

Carol Johnson Removing Ginger

Carol Johnson Removing Ginger

We will learn about the park’s forest restoration efforts from a member of their Natural Resources Management team.

Volunteers should be at least 12 years old, and be able to walk up to 1/2 mile over uneven terrain with a moderate slope. Sturdy walking shoes and long pants are required, along with gear for variable weather conditions (be prepared for sun or rain with a hat, raincoat, sunscreen, etc.) plus drinking water and a snack.

Our goal is a crew of 16 people, and pre-registration is required. All participants will need to sign a Friends release form and a park volunteer form. For those under 18, an adult will need to co-sign.

Be aware that there can be VOG or high levels of SO2 in the area. If it is too heavy or the park is closed, we’ll cancel the project and try to notify everyone in advance.

***If you are interested in volunteering, please contact the Friends at forest@fhvnp.org or call the office at (808)985-7373 by Monday evening, June 10. Please include your first and last name, email address, and a phone number where we can reach you at the last minute in case of cancellation***

 

After Dark in the Park at Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in May. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

  • Lei Making, Wili-Style. Volcano resident and hula student Kanoe Awong shares the traditional wili style of lei making using liko lehua. Learn how to transform the leaves and flower buds of the ‘ōhi‘a lehua tree into beautiful lei. These trees are currently in bloom throughout the park, and its signature red blossom is the official flower of the island of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free. When: Wed., May 8 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Whose footprints are these? (NPS Photo)

Whose footprints are these? (NPS Photo)

  • Whose Footprints Are These Really? Research suggests the story behind the fossilized human footprints in the Ka‘ū Desert may be more complex than originally thought. Footprints found in desert ash layers were believed to have been created in 1790 by the army of the Hawaiian Chief Keōua on their way back from battle. While in the area, Kīlauea erupted, sending suffocating ash down on one group. Others made it out alive, leaving their footprints in the then-wet ash. The ash dried, forever memorializing this event…or did it? Join Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura as she examines fascinating geologic evidence that may indicate much more prehistoric activity in the area. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free. When: Tues., May 14 at 7 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
  • Lei Making, Hilo-Style with Ti Leaf. Malia Macabio and Amy Kaawaloa demonstrate how to make the Hilo style of lei by twisting two strands of ti leaves together. Hula dancers use lei lā‘ī (ti leaf lei) to adorn their wrists and necks. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free. When: Wed., May 22 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

 

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Invites Everyone to Hikes & Programs Offered During National Park Week

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park invites everyone to join special hikes and programs offered at the park during National Park Week, April 20-28. Entrance fees are waived Monday through Friday, April 22-26.

This year’s theme, “Did You Know,” provides a fun way to get to know the park, for both visitors and local residents. For example, did you know that Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is 520 square miles, nearly as large as the entire island of O‘ahu (597 square miles)?

The special, free programs during National Park Week include the following. Please wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water.

Kīlauea Iki trail and crater will be explored in the Kīlauea Ik hike with Charlene Meyers on April 23, during National Park Week. NPS Photo/Michael Szoenyi.

Kīlauea Iki trail and crater will be explored in the Kīlauea Ik hike with Charlene Meyers on April 23, during National Park Week. NPS Photo/Michael Szoenyi.

Kīlauea Iki Crater Hike. Join master ranger volunteer Charlene Meyers on an invigorating four-mile, three-hour hike through the rain forest and onto the crater floor of Kīlauea Iki. Learn how the 1959 eruption forever changed this landscape.
Where: Meet Charlene at the Kīlauea Iki Overlook Parking lot (on Crater Rim Drive)
When: Tuesday, April 23 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Amazing Mauna Ulu. Explore fascinating volcanic features like fissures and lava trees that were formed during the 1969-74 Mauna Ulu eruption with master ranger volunteer Noel Eberz. The one-mile, one-hour round-trip hike will highlight the amazing process of plant survival on this harsh lava landscape.
Where: Meet Noel at the Mauna Ulu parking lot, four miles down Chain of Craters Road.
When: Wednesday, April 24 at 11 a.m., and again at 1 p.m.

Park Ranger Adrian Boone will lead a special trek to the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs during National Park Week, on April 25. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson.

Park Ranger Adrian Boone will lead a special trek to the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs during National Park Week, on April 25. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson.

Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs. Join Park Ranger Adrian Boone for a two-hour, 1.5-mile round-trip trek across ancient lava flows to the largest petroglyph field in Hawai‘i. Discover the meanings inherent in these rock carvings and gather a greater understanding of the native people who created them.
Where: Meet Ranger Adrian at the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs parking area, near the end of Chain of Craters Road. (A 45-minute drive from the park entrance).
When: Thursday, April 25 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

NPS Volunteer Day. Save Hawai‘i’s native rainforest, and join forces with volunteers Jane and Paul Field to remove Himalayan ginger, faya, strawberry guava, and other invasive non-native plants that threaten the native understory alongside Halema‘uma‘u Trail. Bring garden gloves. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water.
Where: Meet the Fields at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Tools will be provided.
When: Saturday, April 27 from 9 a.m. to noon.

There are also regularly scheduled programs in the park, and at the Kahuku Unit, during National Park Week. For a complete listing, visit the park website: http://www.nps.gov/havo/parknews/20130319_pr.htm. In addition, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has special programs during National Park Week: http://fhvnp.org/events/.

The National Park Service will waive entrance fees again on July 13 (Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 33rd Annual Cultural Festival), August 25 (NPS Birthday), Sept. 28 (National Public Lands Day) and Nov. 9-11 (Veteran’s Day weekend).

Hawai‘i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on Hawai‘i Island. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2013 dates. There is no admission at Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, or along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

 

 

“Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula” in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

On Saturday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia and Tim Tunison lead the field seminar “Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula” in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Sunday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula.

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Sunday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula.

“Please join us for this exciting program, following on the heels of the Merrie Monarch Festival, in which a kumu hula (hula teacher/master) and botanist team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula,” stated Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park spokeswoman Elizabeth Fien.

From kumu hula Valencia, learn about hula plants as kino lau, manifestations of Hawaiian deities in plant form (as his Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu understands them).

“There are plants for the hula altar, the kuahu, which include maile, ‘ie‘ie, ‘ilima, lehua, and halapepe.  Plus, there are adornments—mele hula plants that are worn by the dancers—which include maile, ‘ilima, and lehua, plus palapalai, ‘a‘ali‘i, pukiawe, and ‘olapa,” Valencia explained.

Participants meet at the Kilauea Visitor Center.  The day begins with a welcoming oli (chant), followed by a short walk to the kahua hula—the hula platform that overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, home to the volcano goddess Pele.

Next the group will drive to Kilauea Overlook to discuss cultural protocols used when picking plants—and to walk among native species in their natural environment, with scientific information and insight shared by botanist Tunison.

“After lunch, we’ll visit Tunison’s property in Volcano Village, where he is restoring the land to its native ecosystem.  We’ll get a hands-on lesson in native plant propagation, plus receive plant seedlings to grow at home,” said Valencia.

Valencia was born and raised in Honolulu, though his ‘ohana (family) was originally from Hilo.  He established Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu in Honolulu in 1991, and currently maintains his halau (school) in Honolulu as well as Volcano.

Tunison worked for the National Park Service for over 30 years.  He was a Botanist at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park from 1982-1994 and Chief of Resource Management from 1995-2006, when he retired.  Since then, Tunison has taught field botany, native plant propagation, and forest restoration.

This event is presented by the Hawai‘i Volcanoes Institute, a program of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a non-profit organization.  Program cost is $45 for Friends members and $65 for non-members.  Students (K-12 and college with valid student ID) are $25.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to get the member discount.

To register for the “Plants of Hula” field seminar, call 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org.

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or reasonable modification of policies and procedures to participate in this event should email institute@fhvnp.org or call 985-7373 as soon as possible, but no later than 5 days prior to the program start.

 

Pet Reminder for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Managers of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park remind the public that dogs and other pets are not allowed in many areas of the park for safety reasons, and for the protection of threatened and endangered species.

A visiting nature enthusiast strolls along the Ni‘aulani Nature Trail, examining a natural arbor formed by fallen and merged endemic Hawaiian tree ferns

A visiting nature enthusiast strolls along the Ni‘aulani Nature Trail, examining a natural arbor formed by fallen and merged endemic Hawaiian tree ferns

According to 36 CFR § 2.15, pets are prohibited in the following areas of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park:

  • All undeveloped areas of the park, including designated wilderness areas.
  • All trails, including backcountry trails.
  • All backcountry campgrounds, including Kulanaokuaiki.
  • ‘Āinahou, Kīpuka Nēnē, and all of Hilina Pali Road.

Authorized service animals are permitted, but may be prohibited from certain areas if their presence is detrimental to park management programs, like nēnē recovery.

“During  my career in national parks, I have witnessed dogs go over the sides of cliffs chasing birds, and in the past year at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, we have had incidents of dogs off leash in nēnē areas, and most recently, falling into steam cracks, all while seemingly under control of their owners,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “Pets are like our family, and the best way to protect them is to not expose them to the unnecessary hazards and risks prevalent in a national park,” she said.

All pets and service dogs in the park must be leashed at all times. Recently, hikers have reported being bitten by dogs off leash on park trails. In 2012, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park law enforcement officers cited, warned and responded to 24 dog incidents in the park.

Dogs are used by the park to support ungulate control programs, and by law enforcement officers in the performance of their official duties, in accordance with federal and state laws.

 

Virtual Visit to Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and Darryl Castillo Live in Concert

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors this month.  These programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Darryl Castillo

Darryl Castillo (Photos courtesy of Darryl Castillo)

Darryl Castillo Live in Concert.  Enjoy an evening of island music with versatile entertainer, singer/songwriter Darryl Castillo. Castillo has been featured in numerous television programs, including Jake and the Fatman and Island Son. His two albums, Follow the Light and Son Crazy, both garnered Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award nominations for “Best Inspirational Album.” His CDs will be available for purchase. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 20 at 6:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:15 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Photos courtesy of NOAA/James Watt

Photos courtesy of NOAA/James Watt

A Virtual Visit to Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.  The park presents an overview of Hawai‘i’s newest UNESCO World Heritage Site, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. It’s been called a global treasure, rainforest of the sea, the last best place on earth, and it is a place of great cultural significance to Hawaiian people. Join Toni Parras, communications manager for Papahānaumokuākea, on a virtual visit to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This program will cover the people, the partnerships, and the promise for this amazing place. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park presentations. Free.
When: Tues., Feb. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

 

National Park Service Releases Final Plan & EIS for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates

The National Park Service (NPS) has released a Final Plan and Environmental Impact Statement (plan/EIS) for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Volcanoe EIS

The plan provides a park-wide framework to systematically guide non-native ungulate management activities in a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery and provides desirable conditions for active ecosystem restoration. It also supports protection and preservation of cultural resources.

The NPS’s preferred alternative includes a progression of management phases, monitoring, and considerations for the use of management tools; a population objective of zero non-native ungulates, or as low as practicable, in managed areas; complete boundary fencing for Kahuku and ‘Ōla‘a rainforest; and potential use of localized internal fencing to assist in the control of non-native ungulates. Control techniques would be primarily lethal, but non-lethal techniques could also be considered. Volunteer programs would continue, but modifications would be required for lethal removal programs to meet current NPS practices.

The plan/EIS is available online: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/havo_ecosystem_feis. After a required 30-day waiting period following release of the plan/EIS, the NPS will finalize its choice of alternative in a record of decision.

 

Park Invites Students to Enter Film Festival

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is ready for its close up, and invites students to focus their cameras on the park and enter the fourth annual Digital Mountain Film Festival.

Student filmmaker on location in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park/NPS
Photo

Student filmmakers from seventh to twelfth grade can contact Park Ranger Kūpono McDaniel to arrange filming and editing at the park, and beginners are welcome. Ranger Kūpono can be reached at 985-6015 or by email at kupono_mcdaniel@nps.gov.

“This is an opportunity not only for students to express what Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park means to them in a creative, fun way, but for the park to see how we are perceived by our youth – the ones who will be the future stewards of public lands,” said McDaniel.

The short films will be uploaded by park staff to YouTube, and the public will be able to vote for their favorite films online starting Nov. 12. The deadline for all entrants is Nov. 5. The park will loan cameras to students who need them.

The Digital Mountain Film Festival culminates on Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. with a celebration and public showing of the films at the park’s Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Winners, who have a chance to win Mac laptop computers and digital cameras, will be announced at the festival.

This project was made possible in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation through the generous support of L.L. Bean, Disney, the Anschutz Foundation, and the Ahmanson Foundation.

Additional help, funding, and support comes from the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and the Big Island Film Office.

For more information, contact Ranger Kūpono McDaniel at 985-6015 or by email at kupono_mcdaniel@nps.gov, and visit the festival’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/DigitalMountainFilmFestival.

New Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Quarter to Be Released – Coin Forum Night Before

Join United States Mint and National Park Service officials for the presentation of the Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park quarter at 1:30 p.m., August 29, 2012.

The ceremony will take place at the Kahua Hula, south of Kilauea Visitor Center.  Invited guests include United States Senator Daniel Inouye and Governor Neil Abercrombie.  Following the ceremony, the public can exchange their cash for $10 rolls of newly minted Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park quarters at face value.

  • WHAT: Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Quarter Launch
  • WHO: Daniel Inouye, United States Senator, David Croft, Plant Manager, United States Mint at Denver, Cindy Orlando, Superintendent, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, Stephanie Donoho, Tourism Specialist, County of Hawaii
  • WHEN: Wednesday, August 29, 2012, 1:30 p.m. (Hawaii Time)
  • WHERE: Kahua Hula, south of Kilauea Visitor Center Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park One Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI  96718

Coin Forum

The evening before the launch ceremony — 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, August 28, 2012— the United States Mint will host a coin forum.  The public forum provides an opportunity for the public to express their views about future coinage, and to learn about upcoming United States Mint coin programs and initiatives.  The coin forum will be held at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, One Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI  96718.

The America the Beautiful Quarters Program, authorized by Public Law 110-456, is a multi-year initiative to honor 56 national parks and other national sites.  Each year, the public will see five new national sites depicted on the reverse (tails side) of the America the Beautiful Quarters.  The United States Mint will issue these quarters in the order in which the honored site was first established as a national site.

Hike, Explore & Protect Kahuku

Two adventurous programs offered by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will introduce a captivating landscape, biodiversity and history of the park’s southernmost section to intrepid hikers.

Kipukaakihi looking down

People and Land of Kahuku is a two-mile, three-hour expedition through pastures, a quarry, an airstrip and the 1868 lava fields of Kahuku. Rangers will explain how people lived on the vast Kahuku lands, from the earliest Hawaiians through today. Walk in emerging native forest, hear about Kahuku’s history of violent earthquakes and eruptions and the residents who survived them, and find out how Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park plans to restore the native ecosystem and protect Kahuku’s cultural sites.

The hike is offered Feb. 12, Feb. 18, Mar. 11, Mar. 25, Apr. 15 and Apr. 28, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Meet near the Kahuku gate, which is located off Highway 11 between mile markers 70 and 71 on the mauka side of the highway. Park and meet inside the gate near the ranch buildings. Boots, raingear and long pants are recommended. No advance registration is required.

Kīpuka‘akihi is a challenging 1.5 mile, five-hour adventure to see some of the rare plants and wildlife that inhabit this treasured kīpuka.

Participants must be prepared to scramble over fallen trees, lava rock, and slippery, wet terrain. Wear sturdy hiking shoes, long pants, sunscreen and a hat. Bring raingear, garden gloves, a day pack, insect repellent, lunch and water. This forest stewardship program provides opportunities to help protect this rainforest by pulling up invasive kāhili ginger and other invasive non-native plants throughout the kīpuka.

Due to the fragile nature of the region, the program is limited to 15 people and pre-registration is required. To sign up, call (808) 985-6011.

This expedition into Kahuku’s isolated refuge of rare plants is offered Feb. 26, Mar. 18 and Apr. 21, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Meet near the Kahuku gate, which is located off Highway 11 between mile markers 70 and 71 on the mauka side of the highway. Park and meet inside the gate near the ranch buildings.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Parks Joining Others in Waiving Entrance Fees Martin Luther King Weekend – Other Free Days Coming Up

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will join all 397 national park units across the country in waiving entrance fees Jan. 14-16 to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Entrance fees will also be waived on Sat., Jan. 21 to honor the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s 100-year anniversary and Open House.

The HVO Open House on Jan. 21 is an ideal opportunity for residents and visitors to meet USGS scientists, learn how they monitor Hawaiian volcanoes and earthquakes, and appreciate the compelling history of this vital agency. HVO is located within the national park, but is typically not open
to the public. The Open House will feature observatory tours, demonstrations, and other activities, starting from 9 a.m.

For information on the HVO Open House and other programs offered by HVO in January, visit hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

“We are pleased to invite the public to explore their magnificent national park at no charge during these significant milestones,” said Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “I hope everyone has an opportunity to take advantage of the fee-free dates during the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend, and can enjoy the rare privilege of visiting HVO’s Open House,” she said.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will offer numerous ranger-led hikes and programs during the fee-free dates. Visitors can find information at http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/ranger-programs.htm and check the ranger activities bulletin board at the Kīlauea Visitor Center each morning at 9 a.m.

The National Park Service will waive entrance fees on 14 other days in 2012: Apr. 21-29 (National Park Week), June 9 (Get Outdoors Day), July 14 (Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 32nd Annual Cultural Festival), Sept. 29 (National Public Lands Day) and Nov. 10-12 (Veteran’s Day weekend).

Hawai‘i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on the Island of Hawai‘i. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2012 dates. There is no admission at Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, or along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

Information on special offerings at parks nationwide is available at http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

New Quarter Dollar Coin to Feature Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

The United States Mint will feature Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on a commemorative 2012 quarter to be released Aug. 27, 2012, through its America the Beautiful Quarters Program.

The Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park coin depicts an eruption on the east rift zone of Kīlauea, and inscriptions include HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES, HAWAII 2012 and E PLURIBUS UNUM. It was designed and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Charles L. Vickers.

“We are extremely honored that Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was selected by the United States Mint to represent our state on the America the Beautiful quarter, and that they solicited our design input,” said Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando.

According to the United States Mint, the Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ quarter will be the fourth quarter unveiled in 2012, and the 14th in a series of 56 circulating America the Beautiful quarters. The reverse side (or tails
side) designs are symbolic of a national park or other national site in each state, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories.

All coins in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program have a common obverse (heads side) featuring the 1932 portrait of George Washington by John Flanagan, restored to bring out subtle details and the beauty of the original model. Inscriptions on the obverse are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST and QUARTER DOLLAR.

Other emblematic coins with 2012 release dates include El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico, Acadia National Park in Maine, and Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska.

Kilauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone Eruption: 29 Years and Counting

Jan. 3, 2012 marks the 29th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption. This eruption, particularly events that occurred during the past year, will be the topic of an “After Dark in the Park” program in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Tues., Jan. 3.

On Mar. 6, 2011, a spectacular fissure eruption between Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Nāpau Crater on Kīlauea’s east rift zone produced lava flows that poured into a pre-existing ground crack and advanced through an ‘ōhi‘a forest. For scale, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists (lower right) can be seen walking toward the flow. USGS photo by Tim Orr

Tim Orr, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review the eruption, focusing on highlights from Kīlauea’s 2011 activity. The program begins at 7 p.m. at the park’s Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Park entrance fees apply.

The eruption began just after midnight on Jan. 3, 1983, with lava erupting to the surface along several fissures.  By June 1983, the eruption was focused at a single vent. Over the next three years, lava fountains up to 1,500 feet high roared from the vent 44 times, building a cinder-and-spatter cone named Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

In July 1986, the eruption shifted to Kupaianaha, a new vent farther down the east rift zone. Lava poured from this vent nearly continuously for almost six years, burning and burying Kīlauea’s south flank, including the communities of Kapa‘ahu and Kalapana, in 1986 and 1990, respectively.

Early in 1992, the eruption returned to vents on the flanks of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Over the next 18 years, lava flowed down the slopes of Kīlauea, inundating areas within and outside of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National park and often reaching the sea.

During the past year, Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption has included two spectacular fissure eruptions, a dramatic outbreak of lava from the west flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, and, on Dec. 9, 2011, a new ocean entry USGS scientists named West Ka‘ili‘ili—the first ocean entry within the boundaries of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park since 2009.

Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have buried 48 square miles of public and private land, destroying vast tracts of native forest, nine miles of highway, and 213 structures, including homes, a church, and the Waha‘ula Visitor Center in the park.

While Kīlauea’s current east rift zone eruption has been its most destructive event in recent history, the eruption has also been constructive. Molten lava flowing into the sea has added about 500 acres of
new land to Hawai‘i Island.

This presentation is one of many talks, guided hikes, and other programs offered by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park as part of Hawai‘i Island’s third annual Volcano Awareness Month in January. For more information about this talk, please call 808-985-6011.

For a complete schedule of Volcano Awareness Month events, please visit the HVO Web site at www.hvo.wr.usgs.gov or call (808) 967-8844.