Census Bureau Introduces New Interactive Mapping Tool along with Latest American Community Survey Statistics

The U.S. Census Bureau released Census Explorer, a new interactive mapping tool that gives users easier access to neighborhood level statistics. The mapping tool uses updated statistics from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS), which were also released today.

census explorer map

The new application allows users to map out different social, economic and housing characteristics of their state, county or census tract, and to see how these areas have changed since the 1990 and 2000 censuses. The mapping tool is powered by American Community Survey statistics from the Census Bureau’s API, an application programming interface that allows developers to take data sets and reuse them to create online and mobile apps.

“The American Community Survey data are critically important to powering our nation’s 21st century economy,” U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker said. “Making data more accessible and user-friendly for all Americans is a top priority of our ‘Open for Business Agenda’ at the Department of Commerce. The rich statistics in the 2008-2012 ACS will help more businesses, policymakers and communities make better-informed decisions that will help propel U.S. economic growth.”

Interactive map

“Census Explorer is another useful tool, like the dwellr and America’s Economy mobile apps, that the Census Bureau has developed to disseminate statistics faster and make them easier to access,” Census Bureau Director John H. Thompson added. “This interactive map helps users to learn more about the social, economic and housing characteristics of their communities — the same characteristics that drive decision-making from the local to the national level.”

The tool allows users to look at the following eight statistics from the American Community Survey:

  • Total population
  • Percent 65 and older
  • Foreign-born population percentage
  • Percent of the population with a high school degree or higher
  • Percent with a bachelor’s degree or higher
  • Labor force participation rate
  • Home ownership rate
  • Median household income

In addition to these characteristics, more than 40 social, economic and housing topics are now available through the American Community Survey statistics for all communities in the nation, regardless of size, down to the block group level. For example, health insurance coverage statistics are now available for the first time at the neighborhood level.

Additional Exploration Tools

A variety of other Census Bureau data tools have been updated with today’s new numbers, including the Census Bureau’s application programming interface, Easy Stats and American FactFinder. In addition to the updated exploration tools, the Census Bureau is releasing narrative profiles which allow users to explore a graphical and narrative presentation of the statistics from the American Community Survey.

About the American Community Survey

The American Community Survey provides a wide range of important statistics about all communities in the country. The American Community Survey gives communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. Retailers, homebuilders, police departments, and town and city planners are among the many private- and public-sector decision makers who count on these annual results. Ever since Thomas Jefferson directed the first census in 1790, the census has collected detailed characteristics about our nation’s people.

The Census Bureau uses information collected over five years from the American Community Survey in order to have more accurate and reliable statistics for areas with populations smaller than 20,000. Statistics for larger areas are also included with this release, making comparisons across large and small geographies possible.

The Census Bureau is currently reviewing all of the questions on the American Community Survey to ensure adequate coverage of statistical information that communities rely on. The survey is the only source of local statistics for most of the 40 topics it covers, such as educational attainment, housing, employment, commuting, language spoken at home, nativity, ancestry and selected monthly homeowner costs down to the smallest communities. The Census Bureau is inviting the public to give feedback on each question asked in the survey. For more information on the review process, please visit the American Community Survey content review website for more details.

 

Straight Facts About Valentines Day Provided by the US Department of Commerce

Valentine’s Day 2013: Feb. 14

Expressing one’s love to another is a celebrated custom on Valentine’s Day; whereby sweethearts and family members present gifts to one another, such as cards, candy, flowers and other symbols of affection. Opinions differ as to who was the original Valentine, but the most popular theory is that he was a clergyman who was executed for secretly marrying couples in ancient Rome. In A.D. 496, Pope Gelasius I declared Feb. 14 as Valentine Day. Esther Howland, a native of Massachusetts, is given credit for selling the first mass-produced valentine cards in the 1840s. The spirit continues today with even young children exchanging valentine’s cards with their fellow classmates.

Candy

1,155

Number of U.S. manufacturing establishments that produced chocolate and cocoa products in 2010, employing 35,074 people. California led the nation in the number of chocolate and cocoa manufacturing establishments, with 121, followed by Pennsylvania, with 114.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2010, NAICS code (31132) and (31133),
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

409

Number of U.S. establishments that manufactured nonchocolate confectionary products in 2010. These establishments employed 17,526 people. California led the nation in this category, with 49 establishments.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns: 2010, NAICS code (31134)
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

$13.5 billion

Total value of shipments in 2011 for firms producing chocolate and cocoa products.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 Annual Survey of Manufactures, Products and Service Codes 311320 and 311330,
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ASM_2011_31VS101&prodType=table>

Nonchocolate confectionery product manufacturing, meanwhile, was an $8.8 billion industry.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 Annual Survey of Manufactures, Products and Service Code 311340,
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ASM_2011_31VS101&prodType=table>

3,365

Number of confectionery and nut stores in the United States in 2010.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (445292),
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

24.7 pounds

Per capita consumption of candy by Americans in 2010.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Industrial Reports, Confectionery: 2010
<http://www.census.gov/manufacturing/cir/historical_data/ma311d/index.html>

Flowers

16,182

The total number of florists’ establishments nationwide in 2010. These businesses employed 70,575 people.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (4531)
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

$880,893,904

The value of imports for cut flowers and buds for bouquets in 2011. Flower bouquets are a popular gift for loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The total value of fresh cut roses in 2011 was $365,453,189.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau: Foreign Trade Division USA Trade Online U.S. Import and Export Merchandise trade (Commodity code-060319)
<https://www.usatradeonline.gov/>

Jewelry

23,739

Number of jewelry stores in the United States in 2010. Jewelry stores offer engagement, wedding and other rings to couples of all ages. In February 2012, these stores sold $2.66 billion in merchandise.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (448310),
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/> and Monthly Retail Trade and Food Services <http://www.census.gov/retail>

The merchandise at these locations could well have been produced at one of the nation’s 1,453 jewelry manufacturing establishments.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, NAICS code (339911),
<http://www.census.gov/econ/cbp/>

“Please Be Mine”

28.6 and 26.6 years

Median age at first marriage in 2012 for men and women, respectively.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Families and Living Arrangements: 2012,
<http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/marital.html>, Table MS-2

53%

The overall percentage of adults who reported being married.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Families and Living Arrangements: 2012,
<http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html> Table A1

68.8%

Percentage of people 15 and older in 2012 who had been married at some point in their lives — either currently or formerly.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Families and Living Arrangements: 2012,
<http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html> Table A1

38.3

The provisional rate of marriages per 1,000 people performed in Nevada during 2010. So many couples tie the knot in the Silver State that it ranked number one nationally in marriage rates. Hawaii ranked second with a marriage rate of 17.6.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics,
<http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvss/marriage_rates_90_95_99-10.pdf>

2.1 million

The provisional number of marriages that took place in the United States in 2010. That breaks down to nearly 5,800 a day.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics,
<http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/marriage_divorce_tables.htm>

74.5%

The percentage of women who married for the first time between 1990 and 1994, who marked their 10th anniversary. This compares with 83 percent of women who married for the first time between 1960 and 1964.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces: 2009,
<http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf>, Table 4

6.2%

As of 2009, the percentage of currently married women who had been married for at least 50 years. A little more than half of currently married women had been married for at least 15 years.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces: 2009
<http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf>, Table 9

Looking for Love

393

The number of dating service establishments nationwide as of 2007. These establishments, which include Internet dating services, employed 3,125 people and pulled in $928 million in revenue.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 Economic Census
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ECN/2007_US/00A1//naics~8129902>

Try Looking Here . . .

Romantic-sounding places to spend Valentine’s Day:

Rose City, Texas Rose City, Mich. South Heart, N.D.
Loveland, Colo. Darling, Minn. Loveland, Ohio
Romeo, Colo. Sacred Heart, Minn. Loveland Park, Ohio
Lovejoy, Ga. Heart Butte, Mont. Love County, Okla.
Loves Park, Ill. Valentine, Neb. Loveland, Okla.
Lovington, Ill. Lovelock, Nev. Lovelady, Texas
Romeoville, Ill. Loving, N.M. Loving County, Texas
Rosemont, Ill. Lovington, N.M. Valentine, Texas
Romeo, Mich. Love Valley, N.C. Rose Hill Acres, Texas
Rosemont, Md.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder
<http://factfinder2.census.gov>

Giving Love a Second Chance

19.5%

Percentage of people ever married twice as of 2011. Five percent have married three or more times. By comparison, 75.3 percent of people who have ever been married have made only one trip down the aisle.
Source: 2011 American Community Survey
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_B12505&prodType=table>

8

Median length, in years, of first marriages that ended in divorce.
Source: Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces: 2009
<http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf>, Table 8

3.8 and 3.7

The median time in years between divorce and a second marriage for men and women, respectively. However, the two medians are not significantly different from each other.
Source: Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces: 2009
<http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf>, Table 8

9% and 7.9%

Among people 15 and older in 2009, the percentage of men and women, respectively, who had married twice and were still married.
Source: Number, Timing, and Duration of Marriages and Divorces: 2009
<http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf>

Centenarian Life in Hawaii

According to the 2010 Hawaii Census Count, Hawaii has 306 folks over the age of 100 years old.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Puna has at least one of them in Saramae Williams Landers!

Saramae Williams Landers, of Pahoa. Hawaii Islands Oldest Resident

Saramae Williams Landers, of Pahoa. Hawaii Islands Oldest Resident

For every 100,000 residents in Hawaii, there are 20 people over the age of 100 years of age compared to on the mainland where there is only 10 people over the age of 100 per 100,000 people according to a USC Doctor that did a study on Centenarians in Hawaii.

Centenarians

Here is a video about the study done by Dr. Murali D. Nair, Clinical Professor at the University of Southern California that attempts to explain this phenomena

Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander Population Expected to Nearly Double, from 706,000 to 1.4 Million by the Year 2060

The U.S. population will be considerably older and more racially and ethnically diverse by 2060, according to projections released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. These projections of the nation’s population by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin, which cover the 2012-2060 period, are the first set of population projections based on the 2010 Census.

“The next half century marks key points in continuing trends — the U.S. will become a plurality nation, where the non-Hispanic white population remains the largest single group, but no group is in the majority,” said Acting Director Thomas L. Mesenbourg.

Furthermore, the population is projected to grow much more slowly over the next several decades, compared with the last set of projections released in 2008 and 2009. That is because the projected levels of births and net international migration are lower in the projections released today, reflecting more recent trends in fertility and international migration.

According to the projections, the population age 65 and older is expected to more than double between 2012 and 2060, from 43.1 million to 92.0 million. The older population would represent just over one in five U.S. residents by the end of the period, up from one in seven today. The increase in the number of the “oldest old” would be even more dramatic — those 85 and older are projected to more than triple from 5.9 million to 18.2 million, reaching 4.3 percent of the total population.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Baby boomers, defined as persons born between 1946 and 1964, number 76.4 million in 2012 and account for about one-quarter of the population. In 2060, when the youngest of them would be 96 years old, they are projected to number around 2.4 million and represent 0.6 percent of the total population.

A More Diverse Nation

The non-Hispanic white population is projected to peak in 2024, at 199.6 million, up from 197.8 million in 2012. Unlike other race or ethnic groups, however, its population is projected to slowly decrease, falling by nearly 20.6 million from 2024 to 2060.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Meanwhile, the Hispanic population would more than double, from 53.3 million in 2012 to 128.8 million in 2060. Consequently, by the end of the period, nearly one in three U.S. residents would be Hispanic, up from about one in six today.

The black population is expected to increase from 41.2 million to 61.8 million over the same period. Its share of the total population would rise slightly, from 13.1 percent in 2012 to 14.7 percent in 2060.

The Asian population is projected to more than double, from 15.9 million in 2012 to 34.4 million in 2060, with its share of nation’s total population climbing from 5.1 percent to 8.2 percent in the same period.

Among the remaining race groups, American Indians and Alaska Natives would increase by more than half from now to 2060, from 3.9 million to 6.3 million, with their share of the total population edging up from 1.2 percent to 1.5 percent. The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population is expected to nearly double, from 706,000 to 1.4 million. The number of people who identify themselves as being of two or more races is projected to more than triple, from 7.5 million to 26.7 million over the same period.

The U.S. is projected to become a majority-minority nation for the first time in 2043. While the non-Hispanic white population will remain the largest single group, no group will make up a majority.

All in all, minorities, now 37 percent of the U.S. population, are projected to comprise 57 percent of the population in 2060. (Minorities consist of all but the single-race, non-Hispanic white population.) The total minority population would more than double, from 116.2 million to 241.3 million over the period.

Projections show the older population would continue to be predominately non-Hispanic white, while younger ages are increasingly minority. Of those age 65 and older in 2060, 56.0 percent are expected to be non-Hispanic white, 21.2 percent Hispanic and 12.5 percent non-Hispanic black. In contrast, while 52.7 percent of those younger than 18 were non-Hispanic white in 2012, that number would drop to 32.9 percent by 2060. Hispanics are projected to make up 38.0 percent of this group in 2060, up from 23.9 percent in 2012.

Other highlights:

  • The nation’s total population would cross the 400 million mark in 2051, reaching 420.3 million in 2060.
  • The proportion of the population younger than 18 is expected to change little over the 2012-2060 period, decreasing from 23.5 percent to 21.2 percent.
  • In 2056, for the first time, the older population, age 65 and over, is projected to outnumber the young, age under 18.
  • The working-age population (18 to 64) is expected to increase by 42 million between 2012 and 2060, from 197 million to 239 million, while its share of the total population declines from 62.7 percent to 56.9 percent.
  • The ratio of males to females is expected to remain stable at around 104.7 males per 100 females for the population under the age of 18. For the population age 18 to 64, the ratio of males per 100 females is projected to be 98.9 in 2012 and increase to 104.1 in 2060. The ratio for the population age 65 and over is also projected to increase, from 77.3 males per 100 females in 2012 to 84.4 in 2060.

Supplemental population projections, based on constant, low and high projections of net international migration, are planned for release in 2013.

Blog:

What Are Hawaii’s 21 Local Governments?

The following Press Release was generated by the Census Bureau (*cough* although Dave Smith noticed that the data did get updated).  My question… what are the 21 local governments being reported by Census Bureau?

The U.S. Census Bureau released preliminary counts of local governments as the first component of the 2012 Census of Governments.

In 2012, 89,004 local governments existed in the United States, down from 89,476 in the last census of governments conducted in 2007. Local governments included 3,031 counties (down from 3,033 in 2007), 19,522 municipalities (up from 19,492 in 2007), 16,364 townships (down from 16,519 in 2007), 37,203 special districts (down from 37,381 in 2007) and 12,884 independent school districts (down from 13,051 in 2007).

Conducted every five years (for years ending in “2″ and “7″), the census of governments provides the only uniform source of statistics for all of the nation’s state and local governments. These statistics allow for in-depth trend analysis of all individual governments and provide a complete, comprehensive and authoritative benchmark of state and local government activity.

The census of governments measures three components: organization, employment and finance. These components provide statistics on the number of governments that exist, the services they provide, the number of their employees and their financial activity. In addition to the information provided for states, cities, counties and townships, the census of governments also provides information on special districts and school districts.

Other Key Findings

Among the key findings in the 2012 Census of Governments preliminary counts:

  • Illinois leads the nation with 6,968 local governments — approximately 2,000 more
  • Hawaii has 21 local governments, the fewest of any state.
  • Texas remains first in the nation with the most independent school districts at 1,079. Closely behind is California, with 1,025 independent school districts.
  • Seventeen states had more special districts compared with 2007, and 29 had fewer. Five states (including the District of Columbia) had no change.
  • Ten states had fewer townships because of mergers and consolidations. Kansas decreased the most, moving from 1,353 in 2007 to 1,268 in 2012, a decrease of 85.

History of Special Districts and School Districts in the United States

Every five years since 1952, the Census Bureau has completed a comprehensive count of all local governments in the country. The most dramatic changes have been the decline in independent school districts and the notable increase in special districts. An interactive history of the counts of special districts and school districts from 1952 to 2012 can be accessed at http://www.census.gov/govs/go/ or by clicking on the graphic below.

U.S. map

Special districts are organized local entities other than county, municipal, township or school district governments that are authorized by state law to provide only one or a limited number of designated functions. Fire districts, water districts, library districts and transit authorities are examples of special districts.

School districts are created to provide elementary, secondary and/or higher education services and have sufficient administrative and fiscal autonomy to qualify as independent governments. They exclude school systems that are “dependent” on a county, municipal, township or state government.

Accessing the Information for the 2012 Census of Governments

The preliminary counts for the first component of the 2012 Census of Governments can be found on the Census Bureau’s Governments Division website at http://www.census.gov/govs/go/. Final counts will be issued in September 2013. For more information on the Government Units Survey, which produces these counts, go to http://www.census.gov/govs/cog2012/.

The employment component of the 2012 Census of Governments, which began in March of 2012, collects information on the number of state and local government civilian employees and their payrolls. In October 2012, the finance component will collect information on revenues, expenditures, assets, debt and pensions. For more information on the 2012 Census of Governments and statistics about governments, go to http://www.census.gov/govs/cog2012/.

United States Population Reaches Milestone – Pi

Shortly after 2:29 p.m. EDT today, the U.S. population clock will reach a milestone that is very meaningful to mathematical statisticians: it will show there are 314,159,265 residents, or pi (3.14159265) times 100 million.

Pi is a mathematical constant that is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. “This is a once in many generations event…so go out and celebrate this American pi,” said Census Bureau Chief Demographer Howard Hogan. Internet address: <http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html>.

Latest Hawaii County Quick Facts From the US Census Bureau

Here is the latest Hawaii County Quick Facts from the US Census Bureau

Click to view legibly

Hawaii Trends in Voting Provided by the U.S. Census Bureau – The Voting Hot Report

The U.S. Census Bureau Released the Voting Hot Report and I’ve posted the Hawaii statistics below:

The Current Population Survey collects data on voting and voter registration in November of even-numbered years, and has done so since 1964. It provides information about voting and registration by many characteristics, including age, sex, race, and education. Because the data are from a survey, they are subject to sampling error.

Voting and registration rates are historically higher in years with presidential elections than in congressional election years. The text in this report refers to the election of 2010, a congressional election year, but graphics refer to the year you’ve selected from the menu above. In 2010, the observed percentage of age-eligible citizens who voted in Hawaii (43 percent) was not statistically different from the national voting rate of 46 percent.

Voting and registration rates tend to increase with age. In Hawaii in 2010, only 22 percent of 18-to 24-year old citizens voted, compared with 60 percent of those 65 and older.

In most states, including Hawaii, the voting rates for men and women were not statistically different from one another in 2010.

Voting rates also typically increase with education. In Hawaii in 2010, the survey sample size was not large enough to make state specific comments about voting and educational attainment.

The likelihood of voting frequently differs among race groups and Hispanics. In Hawaii in 2010, 47 percent of non-Hispanic Whites and 36 percent of Hispanics reported voting, however these were not statistically different. The Black citizen population was not large enough to make meaningful state specific comparisons.

Notes: “No Response” refers to survey respondents who did not give an answer either because they did not know if they voted or were registered, or because they ended the survey before all questions were asked.

The graphs are generated dynamically, regardless of the size of the sample. You may notice unexpected results for small subpopulations or small states. The entire dataset is available on http://dataferrett.census.gov for you to explore the data more fully.

Presidential elections include 2008, 2004, 2000 and 1996. Congressional elections include 2010, 2006, 2002 and 1998.

Source: All data in this report were collected as part of the November Voting and Registration Supplement as part of the Current Population Survey. For more information about the Source and Accuracy of the data please see : http://www.census.gov/cps/methodology/techdocs.html

For more information see: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/socdemo/voting/about/index.html

Census Bureau Releases More Data – Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Population Grew by 2.9 Percent

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a set of estimates showing that 50.4 percent of our nation’s population younger than age 1 were minorities as of July 1, 2011. This is up from 49.5 percent from the 2010 Census taken April 1, 2010. A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.

The population younger than age 5 was 49.7 percent minority in 2011, up from 49.0 percent in 2010. A population greater than 50 percent minority is considered “majority-minority.”

These are the first set of population estimates by race, Hispanic origin, age and sex since the 2010 Census. They examine population change for these groups nationally, as well as within all states and counties, between Census Day (April 1, 2010) and July 1, 2011. Also released were population estimates for Puerto Rico and its municipios by age and sex.

There were 114 million minorities in 2011, or 36.6 percent of the U.S. population. In 2010, it stood at 36.1 percent.

There were five majority-minority states or equivalents in 2011: Hawaii (77.1 percent minority), the District of Columbia (64.7 percent), California (60.3 percent), New Mexico (59.8 percent) and Texas (55.2 percent). No other state had a minority population greater than 46.4 percent of the total.

More than 11 percent (348) of the nation’s 3,143 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2011, with nine of these counties achieving this status since April 1, 2010. Maverick, Texas, had the largest share (96.8 percent) of its population in minority groups, followed by Webb, Texas (96.4 percent) and Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska (96.2 percent).

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (NHPI)

  • The nation’s Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population was 1.4 million in 2011 and grew by 2.9 percent since 2010.
  • Hawaii had the largest population of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders of any state (359,000) in 2011. California had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (9,000). Hawaii had the highest percentage of NHPI (26.1 percent).
  • Honolulu had the largest population of NHPI of any county (235,000) in 2011. Los Angeles County had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (2,700). Hawaii County had the highest percentage of NHPI (34.0 percent).

Full article here: Most children under the age of 1 are minorities, Census reports

Average Age of Hawaii Resident 38.6 Years Old

Logo for the 2010 United States Census.

Image via Wikipedia

Media Release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released the Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. The demographic profiles provide 2010 Census data on age and sex distributions, race, Hispanic or Latino origin, household relationship and type, the group quarters population, and housing occupancy and tenure (whether the housing occupant owns or rents). Throughout May, these profiles are being released on a rolling basis for all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

The profile includes more than 150 data items in all, plus percentage distributions. Highlights from the state data released today include:

Hawaii

  • The median age was 38.6.
  • The average household size was 2.89 people per household.
  • Among the state’s occupied housing units, 57.7 percent were owned, compared with 42.3 percent that were rented.

Congressional Inaction on Long-Term Highway & Transit Bill Puts 12,690 Hawaii Jobs at Risk, New Study Shows

Map of the present Interstate Highway System i...

Image via Wikipedia

Media Release:

As partisan bickering and posturing continues on Capitol Hill, the failure to pass overdue legislation that provides multi-year federal aid to state highway and transit programs jeopardizes 12,690 jobs in Hawaii, according to new research.

These employees earn a total annual payroll of $673.1 million and contribute an estimated $53.3 million in state and federal payroll tax revenue.  This employment includes the equivalent of 6,322 full-time jobs directly involved in transportation construction and related activities, and 6,368 that are sustained by transportation design and construction industry employee and company spending throughout the state’s economy, according to the analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association Transportation Development Foundation (ARTBA-TDF).

The ARTBA-TDF report, “U.S. Transportation Construction Industry Profile,” revealed the existence of more than 385,103 full-time jobs in Hawaii in key industries like tourism, retail sales, agriculture and manufacturing that are dependent on the state’s transportation network.

The need for road and bridge improvements is clear.  According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Hawaii has 4,365 miles of roadway.  Of the state’s 1,554 miles of roadway eligible for federal aid, 44.5% are rated “not acceptable” and need major repairs or replacement.  This compares to 43% of roads in 2007.  Hawaii also has 1,133 bridges.  FHWA reports 43.2% of the state’s bridges are either “structurally deficient” (143 bridges) or “functionally obsolete” (347 bridges).  It will cost an estimated $1.2 billion to make needed bridge repairs on 775 structures in the state.

The last highway and transit law expired in October 2009.  Federal aid to the states has been sustained ever since through a series of short-term extensions.  The uncertainty of future funding levels is causing state transportation departments to slow down or delay projects, and in turn, impacting hiring decisions and equipment purchases by transportation design and construction firms.

The ARTBA-TDF is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt entity created to “promote research, education and public awareness.”  It supports an array of initiatives, such as scholarships, awards, safety training and economic reports.

An interactive website—www.transportationconstructionjobs.org—has comprehensive data about the impacts of transportation investment on the national and all 50 state economies.

Census Bureau to Release Local Hawaii 2010 Data Next Week

Media Release:

What: Next week, the U.S. Census Bureau anticipates releasing local-level 2010 Census population counts for Alabama, Colorado, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. For each state, the Census Bureau will provide summaries of population totals, as well as data on race, Hispanic origin and voting age for multiple geographies within the state, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties and school districts.

According to Public Law 94-171, the Census Bureau must provide redistricting data to the 50 states no later than April 1 of the year following the census. As a result, the Census Bureau is delivering the data state-by-state on a flow basis in February and March. All states will receive their data by April 1, 2011.

When: Each state’s geographic products and redistricting data are first delivered to the state’s leadership, such as the governor and majority and minority leaders in the state legislative body. Upon confirmation of delivery to the state leadership, we will release a news release with five custom tables of data. Within 24 hours, the full set of five detailed tables will be available to the public online at http://factfinder2.census.gov.

For more information on the Census Bureau’s Redistricting Data Program, visit  http://www.census.gov/rdo.

Hawaii Population Up 12.3% According to US Census Bureau

The US Census Bureau released the population counts today and Hawaii is up 12.3% According to the US Census Bureau’s Website.

Unfortunately, this was not enough to gain a seat in reapportionment.

Media Release:

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that the 2010 Census showed the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538.

The resident population represented an increase of 9.7 percent over the 2000 U.S. resident population of 281,421,906. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Acting Commerce Deputy Secretary Rebecca Blank and Census Bureau Director Robert Groves unveiled the official counts at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

“A big thanks to the American public for its overwhelming response to the 2010 Census,” U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said. “The result was a successful count that came in on time and well under budget, with a final 2010 Census savings of $1.87 billion.”

Rebecca Blank, now Acting Deputy Secretary of Commerce who has overseen the 2010 Census as Under Secretary for Economic Affairs, echoed Locke. “The 2010 Census was a massive undertaking, and in reporting these first results, we renew our commitment to our great American democracy peacefully, fairly and openly for the 23rd time in our nation’s history.”

The U.S. resident population represents the total number of people in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The most populous state was California (37,253,956); the least populous, Wyoming (563,626). The state that gained the most numerically since the 2000 Census was Texas (up 4,293,741 to 25,145,561) and the state that gained the most as a percentage of its 2000 Census count was Nevada (up 35.1% to 2,700,551).

Regionally, the South and the West picked up the bulk of the population increase, 14,318,924 and 8,747,621, respectively. But the Northeast and the Midwest also grew: 1,722,862 and 2,534,225.

Additionally, Puerto Rico’s resident population was 3,725,789, a 2.2 percent decrease over the number counted a decade earlier.

Just before today’s announcement, Locke delivered the apportionment counts to President Obama, 10 days before the statutory deadline of Dec. 31. The apportionment totals were calculated by a congressionally defined formula, in accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code, to divide among the states the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. Each member of the House represents, on average, about 710,767 people. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population, as they do not have voting seats in Congress.

“The decennial count has been the basis for our representative form of government since 1790,” Groves said. “At that time, each member of the House represented about 34,000 residents. Since then, the House has more than quadrupled in size, with each member now representing about 21 times as many constituents.”

President Obama will transmit the apportionment counts to the 112th Congress during the first week of its first regular session in January. The reapportioned Congress will be the 113th, which convenes in January 2013.

Beginning in February and wrapping up by March 31, 2011, the Census Bureau will release demographic data to the states on a rolling basis so state governments can start the redistricting process.

Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution calls for a census of the nation’s population every 10 years to apportion the House seats among the states. The 2010 Census is the 23rd census in our nation’s history.

Census Bureau Releases 2009 American Community Survey Data

Media Release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released the results of the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS), one of a series of data products the Census Bureau is releasing in the coming months that provides information on the nation’s population. Today’s release is based on survey responses collected over the course of the 2009 calendar year and provides data about the nation’s socioeconomic, housing and demographic characteristics. The first set of 2010 Census data, including the nation’s population and congressional apportionment figures for the states, will be released by the end of 2010, as required by law.

“Collectively, ACS and census data are critical components of the nation’s information infrastructure, providing data essential to our economy and our communities,” Census Bureau director Robert Groves said. “ACS data are required by numerous federal programs and for planning and decision making at the state and federal level. ACS data help communities and businesses create jobs, plan for the future, establish new businesses and improve our economy.”

Focusing on the population’s characteristics, the ACS complements, but is different from, the 2010 Census population data. As a complete count of the population, the 2010 Census data are critical for people who need to know how many people live in the United States and where they live. The ACS data, on the other hand, are based on a sample survey of the nation and describe how we live by providing estimates of key social, economic and housing characteristics.

Today’s release covers more than 40 topics, such as income, educational attainment, housing and family structure for all geographies with populations of 65,000 or more.

In December, the Census Bureau will release the first set of ACS statistics for all geographic areas, regardless of size, using data collected between 2005 and 2009. A third set of 2009 statistics covering all areas with populations of 20,000 or more will be released in January 11, 2011, based on data collected between 2007 and 2009.

In addition to the ACS data released today on the Census Bureau website, the Census Bureau is releasing a set of briefs on seven topics: poverty, median household income by state, men’s and women’s earnings by state, food stamp/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program receipt

by state, health insurance coverage among children, disability among the working age population and usual hours worked (see: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/2009_release/). Thirteen additional briefs based on today’s data will be released on this website on October 12.

2009 ACS Highlights

Median Household Income

  • Real median household income in the United States fell between 2008 and 2009 — decreasing by 2.9 percent from $51,726 to $50,221.
  • Between 2008 and 2009, real median household income decreased in 34 states and increased in one: North Dakota.

Poverty

  • Thirty-one states saw increases in both the number and percentage of people in poverty between 2008 and 2009.
  • No state had a statistically significant decline in either the number in poverty or the poverty rate.

Health Insurance

  • Between 2008 and 2009, the percentage of insured children in the United States increased from 90.3 percent to 91.0 percent, with 1.1 million more insured children in 2009.
  • In 2009, the uninsured rate for children under 19 in the United States was 9.0 percent, and the uninsured rate in the states ranged from 18.4 percent in Nevada to 1.5 percent in Massachusetts.
  • Between 2008 and 2009, the uninsured rate for children decreased in the United States as well as in 17 states.  The uninsured rate increased in two states (Alaska and Minnesota) and was not statistically different in 32 states and Puerto Rico.
  • Between 2008 and 2009, the percentage of uninsured increased from 14.6 percent to 15.1 percent, with 2.2 million more uninsured in 2009. The percentage of uninsured increased in 26 states, decreased in three states (Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico) and did not change significantly in 22 states.

Industry and Occupation

  • Work hours in the United States fell by about 36 minutes per week from 39.0 hours in 2008 to 38.4 hours in 2009.
  • Work hours fell in 46 of the 50 most populous U.S. metro areas between 2008 and 2009.
  • Workers in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations worked about 63 minutes less per week in 2009 than in 2008.
  • Self-employed workers experienced a greater reduction in work hours between 2008 and 2009 than workers in other types of employment. Workers who were self-employed in their own unincorporated businesses worked 66 minutes less per week in 2009, while those self-employed in their own incorporated businesses worked 49 minutes less in 2009.

Journey to Work

  • In 2009, the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island metropolitan area had the highest percentage of workers who commuted by public transportation at 30.5 percent, followed by the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont metro area, where 14.6 percent of workers commuted by public transportation.

Home Values

  • In 2009, the median property value for owner-occupied homes in the United States was $185,200.
  • After adjusting for inflation, the median property value decreased in the United States by 5.8 percent between 2008 and 2009.
  • Five of the 10 highest median property values among the 50 most populous metro areas were in California: San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara ($638,300), San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont ($591,600), Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana ($463,600), San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos ($417,700) and Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville ($298,000).
  • Between 2008 and 2009, the percentage change in home values in the 366 metro areas ranged from a decline of 34.0 percent in Merced, Calif., to an increase of 19.7 percent in Hattiesburg, Miss.

Rental Housing Costs

  • Nationwide, nearly two in five renter households (42.5 percent) experienced housing costs that consumed 35 percent or more of their incomes.
  • Housing cost burdens ranged from a low of 23.2 percent of renting households in the Casper, Wyo., metro area to a high of 62.8 percent of renting households in the College Station-Bryan, Texas, metro area.
  • Double digit rental vacancy rates characterized the following 12 of the 50 most populous metro areas:  Jacksonville, Fla.; Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Ga.; Memphis, Tenn.-Miss.-Ark.; Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz.; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla.; Orlando-Kissimmee, Fla.; Houston-Sugarland-Baytown, Texas; Las Vegas-Paradise, Nev.; Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas; San Antonio, Texas; Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Fla.; and Detroit-Warren-Livonia, Mich.
  • Among the 50 most populous metro areas, the Pittsburgh, Pa., metro area had the lowest median gross rent ($643).  Pittsburgh was followed by Buffalo-Niagara Falls, N.Y.; Louisville/Jefferson County, Ky.-Ind.; Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Ky.-Ind.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; and Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio, where rents were between $652 and $706.  The St. Louis, Mo.-Ill., metro area rounded out the most affordable markets with a median gross rent of $732.
  • The San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif. metro area, with a gross rent of $1,414, was the most expensive rental market among the 50 most populous metro areas. Following San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, was the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, Calif., metro area and the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, D.C.-Va.-Md.-W.Va., metro area, both with median gross rent of $1,303.  The fourth highest median gross rent was in the San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, Calif., metro area ($1,224); the fifth highest median gross rent was in the Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif., metro area ($1,197).  Rounding out the top seven most expensive metro areas were New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa. ($1,125) and Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Mass.-N.H. ($1,123), which were not significantly different from each other.

Labor Force Participation

  • The labor force participation rate for men 16 to 24 decreased nationally from 61.5 percent in 2008 to 59.2 percent in 2009, while for women this age the rate decreased from 60.4 percent to 58.7 percent.
  • For men 25 to 54, the national labor force participation rate decreased from 88.5 percent in 2008 to 87.9 percent in 2009, while women in this group experienced an increase from 77.0 percent to 77.1 percent.
  • For men 55 and older, the national labor force participation rate remained unchanged (at 45.2 percent) from 2008 to 2009, while the rate for women increased from 32.8 percent to 33.2 percent.

Disability

  • In 2009, 19.5 million people, or 9.9 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population age 16 to 64, had a disability. Between 2008 and 2009, both the number and percent of people with disabilities did not change.
  • In 2009, West Virginia had the highest disability prevalence rate for people age 16 to 64 at 16.8 percent. Hawaii has the lowest prevalence rate, not different from California, Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Utah.
  • About 34.7 percent of people with disabilities were employed compared with 71.9 percent of people without a disability. North Dakota had the highest employment-to-population ratio for people with disabilities, not different from Wyoming.
  • The District of  Columbia had the lowest employment-to-population ratio for people with disabilities, not different from Alabama, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia.

Education — Science and Technology

  • A new question in the 2009 American Community Survey asked respondents with bachelor’s degrees about their undergraduate major:
  • The estimated number of people in the United States 25 and over with a bachelor’s degree or higher was 56.3 million. Of this group, 20.5 million, or 36.4 percent, held at least one science and engineering degree.
  • The percentages of all bachelor’s degrees in the science and engineering fields were 28 percent or less in Mississippi, North Dakota and Puerto Rico, and as high as 51 percent in the District of Columbia.

Foreign-Born

  • According to the 2009 ACS, 38.5 million of the 307 million residents in the United States were foreign-born, representing 12.5 percent of the total population. In 2008, there were 38 million foreign-born in the United States, also making up 12.5 percent of the total population. The number of foreign-born in the United States increased between 2008 and 2009, in contrast to 2007-2008, when the number of foreign-born did not change significantly.

Language by Hispanic Origin and Race

  • Overall, among the major race groups and Hispanic origin, non-Hispanic whites had the lowest proportion (6 percent) of people who spoke a language other than English at home, and Asians alone and Hispanics had the highest proportion (77 percent and 76 percent, respectively).
  • Hispanics were much more likely to speak a language other than English at home (76 percent) compared with non-Hispanics (10 percent). Among the selected Hispanic detailed groups, Dominicans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans, each around 92 percent, were among the top three groups with the highest percent who spoke a language other than English at home. This was followed by Colombians (87 percent), Cubans (82 percent), Mexicans (76 percent) and Puerto Ricans (66 percent).

The Older Population

  • People 60 and over were more likely than the total population to have a disability. In 2009, 32.4 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population 60 and over reported having a disability compared with 12.0 percent of the total civilian noninstitutionalized population.
  • Approximately one quarter (27.1 percent) of the population 60 and over reported being in the labor force, an increase from 26.7 percent in 2008.

ABOUT THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

The American Community Survey is the successor to the former census “long form” that historically produced demographic, housing and socioeconomic data for the nation as part of the once-a-decade census. The decennial census program, which includes the ACS and the 2010 Census, serves as the basis for the allocation of more than $400 billion in federal funds to state, local and tribal governments every year.  These vital data also guide planning in the private sector as well as the work done by policymakers at all levels of government and in communities of all sizes. All survey responses are strictly confidential and protected by law.

As is the case with all surveys, statistics from sample surveys are subject to sampling and nonsampling error. All comparisons made in the reports have been tested and found to be statistically significant at the 90 percent confidence level, unless otherwise noted. Please consult the data tables for specific margins of error. For more information, go to http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/documentation_main/.

Changes in survey design from year to year can affect results. See http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/2009_release/ for more information on changes affecting the 2009 data. See http://www.census.gov/acs/www/guidance_for_data_users/comparing_2009/ for guidance on comparing 2009 ACS data with data from previous years and the 2000 Census.

Visit “American FactFinder,” the Census Bureau’s online data tool, to obtain ACS 2009 data for the nation, all states and the District of Columbia, all congressional districts, approximately

800 counties, and 500 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, among others.

Native Hawaiians Have Higher Risks of Death than White Americans

Media Release:

Throughout their lives, Native Hawaiians have higher risks of death than white Americans, according to a University of Michigan study.

The research is the first known study to assess mortality patterns among Native Hawaiians at the national level, including those living outside the state of Hawaii.

The study is published in the November 2010 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, online Sept. 16. It was funded by the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities, part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Native Hawaiians are far more likely than whites to suffer early death,” said demographer Sela Panapasa, an assistant research scientist at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR) and lead author of the article. “Like Black Americans, they are also much more likely than whites to die in mid- and later-life.”

Based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics, the study shows that Native Hawaiian infants less than one year old and young people between the ages of 15 and 34 are particularly vulnerable to early death compared with corresponding age groups of white Americans.

“We also found that older Native Hawaiians have higher expected death rates than either Blacks or whites age 65 and over, suggesting that relatively fewer of this group have benefited from the increased longevity enjoyed by the rest of the nation,” said Panapasa, who is a Pacific Islander of Polynesian heritage.

“These results support the idea that renewed efforts are needed to better understand the specific causes and risk factors of increased mortality among Native Hawaiians and other high risk minority populations, including Pacific Islanders, Southeast Asians, Native Americans, and Alaskan Natives,” Panapasa said. “They should also prompt further investigation into the precursors of premature mortality among Native Hawaiians, including access to health care and prenatal care, socioeconomic status, and the impact of colonization, oppression and other social determinants on health outcomes.”

Panapasa’s co-authors are Marjorie Mau of the University of Hawaii, David Williams of Harvard University, and James McNally of U-M’s ISR.

Pacific Islanders in the United States are a distinct and rapidly growing population, Panapasa noted. Based on the 2000 U.S. Census, there were 874,000 Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. Native Hawaiians represent the largest sector (46 percent) of this population.

Until 1996, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders were aggregated with the larger U.S. Asian population. “Because of their relatively small numbers, their social, economic, and health status has been chronically under-represented in national surveys and distinctive patterns have been missed,” Panapasa said.

“As the U.S. becomes increasingly diverse both racially and ethnically, this type of analysis allows for new insights into the underpinnings of differences in morbidity and mortality,” Panapasa said. “It offers an opportunity to identify how best to reduce health concerns and disparities in racially diverse populations.”