• Follow on Facebook

  • puako-general-store
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    July 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

EPA Requires Matheson Tri-Gas Kapolei to Close Illegal Cesspools

Yesterday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced an agreement with Matheson Tri-Gas to close three cesspools at its Kapolei facility on Oahu.

Click to read the consent agreement and final order

In May 2016, EPA inspected the Matheson Tri-Gas facility, a commercial gas supply company in the Campbell Industrial Park, and found two large-capacity cesspools (LCCs) in use. EPA regulations under the Safe Drinking Water Act required closure of all existing LCCs by April 5, 2005.

Matheson, which acquired the facility in 2015, will close the two LCCs and convert to a septic system. The company will pay a civil penalty of $88,374 for violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act and spend $50,000 on a supplemental environmental project to close an on-site small-capacity cesspool. Matheson expects to complete the closure of all three cesspools and convert to a septic system by the end of 2017.

“Matheson has agreed to not only close and replace its LCCs with approved systems, but will also close an additional small-capacity cesspool at its facility,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “EPA will continue to focus on closing illegal cesspools to protect Hawaii’s drinking water and coastal water resources.”

Cesspools collect and discharge untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and harmful chemicals can contaminate groundwater, streams and the ocean. Groundwater provides 99 percent of all domestic water in Hawaii, where cesspools are used more widely than in any other state. Since EPA banned LCCs in 2005, over 3,000 large-capacity cesspools have been closed state-wide, many through voluntary compliance. The ban does not apply to individual cesspools connected to single-family homes.

For more information and to submit comments on this specific agreement visit:

https://www.epa.gov/uic/hawaii-cesspools-administrative-orders#oahu

For more information on the large-capacity cesspool ban and definition of a large-capacity cesspool, please visit: http://www.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii

Hawaii Department of Health Exceeds Federal Targets for Drinking Water State Revolving Funds

The Hawaii State Department of Health Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program has exceeded funding requirements by disbursing more than $30,180,000 of loan funds in state fiscal year 2016 to support infrastructure improvements in public water systems for all four counties. This successfully meets and exceeds the target of $30 million in total disbursements approved last year by federal officials.

Clean Water Act Logo

In addition, the Department of Health executed loan agreements to provide funding totaling more than $55.5 million, exceeding the $51.8 million target.

“The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund is an important resource for Hawaii where infrastructure improvements are routinely required to support our communities,” said Keith Kawaoka, deputy director of Environmental Health. “I commend our staff and the counties for making the best possible use of this federally funded source and for strengthening confidence overall in sustaining the program.”

Joanna Seto, Safe Drinking Water Branch chief said, “Mahalo to our State Revolving Fund team and County partners who stepped up to the plate and hit a grand slam home run by initiating major improvements to water systems in every county. Everyone at the Department of Health and the County water departments pulled together to effectively use these funds to improve every county’s infrastructure and meet the 2016 targets for our state.”

Each year, Congress appropriates funds that are administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide grants to states to capitalize low-interest loan programs for public water system infrastructure improvements. By meeting these targets, the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund is positioned to receive the entire EPA capitalization grant award of $8,312,000 for state fiscal year 2017.

“The Hawaii Department of Health has made significant progress in funding needed drinking water infrastructure, in response to our 2015 corrective action plan,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “We will continue to ensure that critical drinking water projects are funded promptly to support safe drinking water for all in Hawaii.”

The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund supported the following projects in FY 2016:

  • The Hawaii Department of Water Supply received $32.29 million in commitments and disbursed more than $14.21 million. The commitments will support the following six projects: Laupahoehoe 0.5 MG Reservoir, Olaa #6 Production Well and 1.0 MG Reservoir, Halaula Well Development Phase 1, Waimea Water Treatment Plant Microfiltration, Kapulena Well Development Phase 2, and the Ahualoa-Honokaa Transmission Waterline.
  • The Honolulu Board of Water Supply (HBWS) committed $11.65 million and disbursed $9.49 million. The commitment will support the HBWS Water System Improvements 2 loan which includes the Liliha Water System Improvements Phase V, Pensacola Street Water System Improvements, and Kapahulu Water System Improvements Phase I projects.
  • The Maui Department of Water Supply received $11.64 million in commitments and disbursed more than $4.29 million. The commitments will provide support for the following five projects: Wailuku Heights Tank 30 Booster Replacement, Phase 6 Booster Pump Upgrades, Kualapuu MCC Upgrades, Omapio 2.1 MG Tank Replacement, and Source Generator Installation at 4 Sites.
  • Kauai Department of Water disbursed $2.18 million.

Using the Financial Operations and Cash Flow Utilization in the State Revolving Fund (FOCUS) financial planning model, the state has set its fiscal year 2017 targets at $38.8 million for executed loans and $44.3 million for disbursements by June 2017.

Since it began in 1997, the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund has disbursed a total of more than $222.7 million in low interest loans for infrastructure improvements throughout the state.

Background

There are two funds for water system infrastructure improvement projects: the Clean Water State Revolving Fund infrastructure loan program, established by the Clean Water Act of 1987, and the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund infrastructure loan program, established by the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996.

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund, which is also referred to as Hawaii’s Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund, provides low-interest loans to Hawaii’s four counties to construct high-priority wastewater, storm water, and non-point source water pollution projects. Since it began in 1991, the Clean Water State Revolving Fund has disbursed more than $686.9 million in low-interest loans, providing significant savings in interest costs to the counties.

EPA Enforces Ban on U.S. Army’s Cesspools on Oahu and Big Island – Army Fined $100,000

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced an agreement with the U.S. Army to close four illegal large capacity cesspools on Oahu and eight on the Big Island. The Army will pay a $100,000 fine, the first time EPA has imposed a civil penalty against a federal government facility for operating banned cesspools.

Click to read

Click to read

“The convening of the International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu this week serves as a reminder of why EPA is focused on shutting down all large capacity cesspools,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Our goal is to protect Hawaii’s coastal waters.”

EPA found that the Army continued to use the cesspools despite a 2005 ban under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act’s Underground Injection Control program. The Army had failed to close three large capacity cesspools at Wheeler Army Airfield and one at Schofield Barracks on Oahu, as well as eight on the Big Island at the Pohakuloa Training area and the Kilauea Military Camp.

As a result of EPA’s enforcement action, the Army has closed one cesspool, and replaced two others at Wheeler Army Airfield and another at Schofield Barracks with approved wastewater treatment systems. Under the settlement agreement, the Army must also close or replace all eight of the large capacity cesspools still in use on the Big Island.

Cesspools collect and discharge untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and harmful chemicals can contaminate groundwater, streams and the ocean. They are used more widely in Hawaii than any other state. Throughout Hawaii, over 3,000 large capacity cesspools have been closed since the 2005 ban, many through voluntary compliance. The EPA regulations do not apply to single-family homes connected to their own individual cesspools.

For more information on the case, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/region9/enforcement/pubnotices/pubnotice-us-army.html

For more information on the large capacity cesspool ban, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii

Governor Abercrombie Releases $46.39 Million for Capital Improvement Projects Statewide

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced the release of more than $46.39 million for various capital improvement projects (CIP) across Hawaii, including investments required to qualify for federal funding toward state projects.

abercrombieheader

“Many of these priority projects require matching state funds to access federal dollars, secured before sequestration, to maintain and upgrade our public infrastructure and facilities,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “These CIPs will have the added benefit of stimulating Hawaii’s economy and generating local jobs. Priority has been given to projects that can begin quickly.”

Allotment of funds for the following priority projects, identified by members of the state Legislature, has been approved by the Governor:

Statewide

  • $14,000,000 – Public Facilities and Sites, statewide – Design and construction for various repair and alteration projects to existing State Office Buildings; projects may include roofing, other repairs and improvements.
  • $3,157,000 – Wastewater Treatment Revolving Funds for Pollution Control, statewide – Transfer of general obligation bond funds to the Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund to match more than $15 million in federal funds to finance wastewater infrastructure construction projects (such as wastewater systems, storm water, and non-point source projects) across the state to attain and maintain compliance with the federal Clean Water Act
  • $2,715,000 – Safe Drinking Water Revolving Fund, statewide – Transfer of general obligation bond funds to the Drinking Water Treatment Revolving Loan Fund to match more than $13 million in federal funds to finance drinking water infrastructure construction projects across the state for public water systems to attain and maintain compliance with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act
  • $1,000,000 – State Parks Energy and Water Efficiency Improvements, statewide – Design and construction of renewable energy sources for state park facilities and replacement of aging energy and water systems with efficient fixtures, systems and facilities
  • $1,000,000 – ADA Public Accessibility at Department of Land and Natural Resources Facilities, statewide – Design and construction to provide public accessibility at several DLNR facilities pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act; projects include the replacement of the accessible lift at Iolani Palace State Monument and an accessible route to the telephone at Heeia Kea Small Boat Harbor on Oahu, as well as an accessible parking area in the Wailoa Small Boat Harbor and an accessible loading area at Rainbow Falls State Park on Hawaii Island

Civil Defense

  • $2,343,434 – Lump Sum CIP for Department of Defense (DOD) Facilities, Infrastructure and Devices, statewide – Various DOD CIP projects, such as renovation of Building 621 in Hilo, and renovation of the State Civil Defense Building 303 and road/parking resurfacing of the “Emergency Operations Center” at Fort Ruger on Oahu
  • $1,250,000 – Energy Savings Improvements and Renewable Energy Projects, statewide – Design and construction for various energy savings and renewable energy improvements at Hawaii Army National Guard facilities; projects include investigating the feasibility and design of wind/solar/photovoltaic systems at the department’s armories, installing new energy efficient air conditioning equipment and digital controls at various facilities, and various other energy projects
  • $450,000 – 29th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Readiness Center, Kalaeloa, Oahu – Design and construction for a Readiness Center at Kalaeloa; this project will provide office space, training rooms, storage, meeting rooms, and other National Guard Bureau required areas (DOD has completed the initial design work using federal funds; total project cost will be $33.9 million, including $33 million in federal funds and $900,000 in state funds)
  • $125,000 – Building 19 restoration, Kalaeloa, Oahu – Equipment and work needed to complete installation of a fire suppression system for Building 19 (Readiness Center) for the Hawaii Army National Guard
  • $50,000 – Minor Military Construction and Renovation at Army Guard Facilities, Oahu – Planning for the renovation of Building 282 at Kalaeloa

Hospitals

  • $1,100,000 – Samuel Mahelona Memorial Hospital, Kauai – Design and construction to address main water pipes that have deteriorated due to age and corrosion from the salt air and have started to leak; the project will consist of removing and replacing all damaged main water piping with PVC and copper piping
  • $700,000 – Lanai Community Hospital, Lanai – Design, construction and equipment to install a photovoltaic system that will generate 40 Kwh of power, which is approximately 50 percent of the daily electricity needs for the hospital (Energy savings is expected offset the cost of the installation in 7 years)
  • $590,000 – Leahi Hospital, Oahu – Repairs to weathered concrete, replacement of caulking, and repainting of the exterior of the Atherton and administration buildings
  • $110,000 – Leahi Hospital, Oahu – Design and construction for the removal of an incinerator stack; current equipment is no longer in use and has begun to deteriorate

Housing

  • $7,000,000 – Kalihi Valley Homes, Oahu – Work to complete Phase IV site and dwelling improvements; the HPHA recently completed the full remodeling of 23 of the 42 residential buildings
  • $1,900,000 – Puahala Homes, Oahu – Work to compete Phase 1B abatement and modernization of Buildings 4, 5 and 6 of the 128-unit complex, including interior renovations of the units
  • $1,800,000 – Kaahumanu Homes, Oahu – Construction for complete site improvements, including spall repair, painting for 19 buildings, interior renovations, security fencing, and roadway and sidewalk improvements
  • $600,000 – Hauiki Homes, Oahu – Completion of construction for site work and roof repairs, including sidewalk and stair repairs of the 46-unit public housing project in Kalihi

Other

  • $5,050,000 – Maui Veterans Cemetery, Maui – Pre-design, design and construction for expansion and improvements to the veterans cemetery
  • $930,000 – Kalaupapa Settlement Improvements, Molokai – Design and construction for closure of landfills and reroofing of the store and administration buildings (two separate projects)
  • $500,000 – Waianae Small Boat Harbor, Oahu – Design and construction of covered vessel storage facilities, utilities and related improvements
  • $20,000 – Kaneohe Public Library, Oahu – Design and construction for replacement of the existing circulation desk and related improvements; the area will accommodate children and be compliant with ADA accessibility guidelines

 

Environmental Protection Agency Initiates Enforcement Actions Against Kauai Restaurant

EPA issues complaint to Tahiti Nui for failing to close cesspools – Kauai restaurant failed to respond to demands to comply with requirements

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated an enforcement action under the Safe Drinking Water Act against Christian Marston and Tahiti Nui Enterprises, Inc. LLC for failing to close three large capacity cesspools in Hanalei, Kauai.

Christian Marston

“EPA is committed to protecting Hawaii’s vital water resources by closing these illegal large capacity cesspools,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Although almost 3,000 cesspools have been closed, an alarming number are still in use.”

EPA has inspected Marston’s property, including the Tahiti Nui Restaurant and Cocktail Bar, multiple times and notified Marston that his establishment was in violation of the federal regulations. In 2006, the owner acknowledged the operation of large capacity cesspools and retained the services of a professional engineer to design a state-approved individual wastewater system to replace the cesspools.

However, in 2010 EPA determined that Marston had failed to comply with the requirements to close and convert the three cesspools serving his property. As a result of the continued noncompliance, EPA is now seeking penalties of up to $177,500, the amount authorized under the Safe Drinking Water Act, in addition to prompt closure and replacement of the cesspools with an approved wastewater system.

The facility is located in a “priority watershed,” as designated by the State of Hawaii and EPA, where use of the large capacity cesspools poses a significant risk to underground sources of drinking water and nearby surface waters.

A large capacity cesspool discharges untreated sewage from multiple dwellings, or a non-residential location that serves 20 or more people per day. EPA regulations prohibited new large capacity cesspool construction after April 2000 and required closure of existing large cesspools as of April 2005. The regulations do not apply to single-family homes connected to their own individual cesspools or to non-residential cesspools that do not have the capacity to serve 20 or more people.

Cesspools, which are used more widely in Hawaii than any other state, discharge raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and other contaminants can pollute groundwater, streams and the ocean.  Large capacity cesspools are used by restaurants, hotels, office complexes, and multiple dwellings, such as duplexes, apartments and condominiums, to dispose their sanitary waste.

For more information on this particular complaint visit: http://www.epa.gov/region9/enforcement/pubnotices/pubnotice-tahiti-nui.html

For more information on the large capacity cesspool ban, please visit: http://www.epa.gov/region09/water/groundwater/uic-hicesspools.html