• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    October 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  

Lava Flow Crosses Highway, Enters Ocean

This is a Hawai‘i County Civil Defense Message for Saturday, May 19, 2018, at 11 p.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory continues to monitor active flows. Flow front #1 has crossed Highway 137 at the 13-mile marker and has entered the ocean. Flow front #2 is approximately 400 Meters from Highway 137. Highway 137 is closed between Kamali‘i Road and Pohoiki Road.  Kamali‘i Road is closed between Highway 130 and Highway 137. Residents in the area have been evacuated. All persons are asked to stay out of the area.

The lava has entered the ocean. Be aware of the laze hazard and stay away from any ocean plume.

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:15 pm on Saturday, May 19. The two primary lava flows originate from the Fissure 20-22 area, and crossed Pohoiki Road over the past day. The flow front position based on a 6:40 p.m. update is shown by the red circle. The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe. (USGS Map)

  • Laze is formed when hot lava hits the ocean sending hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles into the air.
  • Health hazards of laze include lung, eye and skin irritation.
  • Be aware that the laze plume travels with the wind and can change direction without warning.

USGS: Threat of Even Larger Steam-Driven Violent Explosion

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces that with ash eruptions occurring from Kīlauea’s summit this week, there is a threat of an even larger steam-driven violent explosion. Such an eruption could happen suddenly and send volcanic ash 20,000 feet into the air, threatening communities for miles. USGS and NOAA’s National Weather Service are working together to observe, model and warn the public of hazardous conditions. Here is where you can find the information you need to stay safe.

This photo was taken on Wednesday, May 15, 2018, At 11:05 a.m. Photograph from the Jaggar Museum, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, captures an ash plume rising from the Overlook crater. Ash falling from the plume can be seen just to the right side (and below) the plume. (USGS Photo)

Observations and Status of Kīlauea

While the ​USGS Hawai‘i Volcanoes Observatory​ is positioning staff to observe the volcano and best communicate its status and evolution, they rely heavily on the weather forecasts from NOAA. Wind forecasts, ​along with dispersion models such as HYSPLIT,​ are critical in understanding where sulphur dioxide (SO2) and particulate matter (PM2.5) will disperse from fissures and vents to ensure safety of USGS observers, emergency managers and the public.

Ashfall Advisories, Warnings and Current Weather Forecast from Honolulu

On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 the National Weather Service issued the first ever ashfall advisory for Hawai‘i. Forecasters will issue ashfall advisories and warnings when ashfall is a hazard. NOAA predicts where an ash plume will go and how much ash will accumulate using USGS’s ​Ash3d Volcanic Ash Dispersion Model​.

Volcanic Ash Advisories​ and ​Aviation Warnings

Volcanic ash clouds can threaten air traffic by sandblasting windscreens, clogging pitot tubes, and in severe cases, causing jet engines to shut down. NOAA issues volcanic ash warnings to alert pilots to potential ash in the atmosphere and will include volcanic ash in forecasts for airports.

Tips to Stay Safe

During explosive eruptions, volcanic ash can disrupt downwind populations by causing breathing problems, impacting water quality, clogging air filters, shorting out power systems and making transportation difficult.​ If your community is threatened by ash, you are advised to do the following:

  • Seal windows and doors.
  • Protect electronics and cover air intakes and open water sources.
  • Avoid driving as visibility will be reduced and roads may become slippery.
  • Remain indoors to avoid inhaling ash particles unless it’s absolutely necessary to go outside. If you have a respiratory illness, do not go outside.
  • If you must go outside, cover your mouth and nose with a mask or cloth.

No-Entry Zone Established for Hawai‘i Electric Light Crews in Leilani Estates

Hawai‘i Electric Light announces that all of Lanipuna Gardens and a portion of Leilani Estates has been designated as a no-entry zone for its crews.

Hawaiian Electric Facebook Photo.

These areas are hazardous to enter due to continued ground swelling and cracking, sudden fissure activity, and unsafe levels of SO2. Crews were working in the subdivision in the last few days and have narrowly escaped situations that could have resulted in severe injury. Hawai‘i Electric Light’s priority continues to be safety and can no longer allow its employees to enter hazardous areas.

Poles and wires continue to fall due to changes in the ground formation and seismic activity. Hawai‘i Electric Light continues to warn residents to assume that all downed lines and equipment are energized and dangerous. Stay at least three cars lengths away from downed lines and use caution around all poles and overhead lines.

The following areas are in the no-entry zone. This area may be extended.

  • Leilani Avenue from Pomaikai Street to Pohoiki Road
  • Malama Street, east from Pomaikai Street
  • Kahukai Street from Nohea Street to Leilani Avenue
  • Pomaikai, Moku, and Kupono Streets south of Leilani Avenue
  • All streets east beginning with Nohea Street
  • All of Lanipuna Gardens including Hinalo, Lauone, and Honuaula Streets, and all connector roads into Lanipuna Gardens

Check Hawai‘i Electric Light’s website (www.hawaiielectriclight.com), Twitter (@HIElectricLight), and Facebook (HawaiianElectric) accounts for updates.

Pahoa Residents Come Out in Force for Mayor Kenoi’s Community Meeting

Last night at the Pahoa Community Center, Mayor Kenoi and many County of Hawaii department heads attended a talk story meeting to an overflow crowd of about 150 people.

There was no space left in the room and residents literally listened from outside.

Mayor Kenoi himself was running a bit late so Parks and Recreation Director Bob Fitzgerald started the meeting out by welcoming the crowd and allowing the department heads a chance to introduce themselves.

Parks and Recreation Director Bob Fitzgerald addresses the crowd.

Mayor Kenoi arrived as a lady was just beginning to go off and Kenoi tried his best to calm the lady down before addressing the crowd.  Kenoi talked about the improvements that the Pahoa area has seen in the last few years such as the newly paved town road and the new police and fire stations before taking questions from the crowd.

Mayor Kenoi addresses the crowd

Puna resident Aurora Martinovitch had very strong emotions tied to Puna Geothermal Ventures as did many others and complained about the county not relocating her and a few others fast enough.

Aurora Martinovitch talks about her ongoing problem with Puna Geothermal Ventures

Mayor Kenoi took offense with some folks saying that he wasn’t supporting Puna and mentioned how he was from Puna and that even part of his middle name was “Puna”.

I filmed the first part of Mayor Kenoi’s talk story and as you can see from the video… emotions were quite high in the room.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/2LCQcXNR8lA]

The Hawaiian Perspectives on Geothermal Energy Discussion Was Today

The Pahoa Community Center was filled today with some of the more well known names in the Hawaiian Community this morning as a discussion on “Hawaiian Perspectives on Geothermal Energy” took place.

The who's who of Puna packed into the Pahoa Community Center this morning.

The Pule (Opening Prayer) was given by former 5th District Councilwoman Emily Naeole.

Kale Gumapac and Emily Naeole

The Sponsors of the event were:

  • Kealoha Estate – Kuulei Cooper
  • OHA Trustee – Bob Lindsey
  • Innovations Development Group – Robbie Cabral
  • Indigenous Consultant – Mililani B. Trask
  • Aha Kanaka Moku o Keawe – Kale Gumapac

Patricia Brandt introduces the sponsors of the event

Patricia Brandt opened the panel by asking the following: “…But our question is – What has happened in the twenty years since then… what has benefited this community…?

[youtube=youtube.com/watch?v=zG7ym9Lfa3M]

Considerations:

Geothermal resources belong to the native Hawaiian and the public.  Under State law, these resources are “minerals” and are an assets of the ceded land trust.  Private development of our trust resources has already pushed the cost up 487.5% (it cost 8 cents per kilowatt hour for geothermal electricity but HELCO/PGV costs incresase charges to 39 cents for the consumer)  How can our energy resources be developed in a community-based way that is culturally appropriate, socially responsible and environmentally sustainable and clean?

Senator Hanohano and Mililani Trask touch basis before the discussion begin

Among the speakers and panelist were:

  • Mililani B. Trask who’s message was stressed with “Lets not repeat past mistakes”.
  • Kumu Hula Cy Bridges – “How do we balance traditional practice with modern trust obligations and community energy needs”
  • Kuulei Cooper – “Why geothermal development can  should support community projects like the Puna Community Park, an effort that has been ongoing for 28 years.
  • OHA Trustee Bob Lindsey – Benefits (reventues) that come to Hawaiians & OHA from geothermal Royalties, protections for Wao Kele o Puna Forest.
  • Kale Gumapac – “Why Hawaiians should be informed in and involved in development of their trust asstes, the need for Hawaiian development options, what are “community benefits?”

Mililani B. Trask opened up the discussion with a bit of an introduction about who the folks involved in the project are:

[youtube=youtube.com/watch?v=IGevfQuU3eE]

I wish I could have stayed for the entire meeting but I had prior commitments.