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Bill to Protect Homeschooled Keiki Deferred

Sen. Kaiali‘i Kahele. Courtesy photo

In an effort to protect abused children, Sen. Kaiali‘i Kahele had worked with the Hawai‘i County Prosecutors office to introduce Senate Bill 2323 that would have established procedures for a parent or legal guardian to obtain authorization to home school a child.

However, understanding the strong concerns about the measure, Sen. Kahele requested the bill be withdrawn during the joint hearing of the Senate Committees on Education and Human Services. In his request.

He offered this explanation:

“Senate Bill 2323 was never meant to not allow loving, caring, families from homeschooling your child and from infringing on your constitutionally protected rights. It was meant to protect children that live unimaginable lives, and are abused, neglected at the hands of the very parents and guardians that should be nurturing them and forgotten by a system that should be protecting them.

“Today is Valentine’s Day and many of us will get to share this special day with our loved ones. But that is not the case for Peter Boy Kema, Shaelyn Lehano Stone and many other children across Hawai‘i and America, who do not have a voice and live their lives in fear.

“This is a conversation we need to have. It is a conversation we need to have in other States throughout our country and it is a conversation we need to have here in Hawai‘i.

“Due to the overwhelming testimony in opposition and the overwhelming turnout today at the Capitol, as the introducer of the bill, your voices have been heard by me and my colleagues and I would like to request that this bill be withdrawn and deferred.

“In the interim, I am committed to work in collaboration with stakeholders, the Home School Network, Department of Education and other agencies to address this issue and return next Session with a bill that protects all keiki of Hawai‘i.”

The Senate Committees on Education and Human Services deferred action on SB2323.

2016-17 Strive HI Performance System Results

The Hawaii State Department of Education shared its 2016-17 Strive HI Performance System results this evening during the Board of Education community meeting. The school accountability system focuses on state and schools’ progress on Strategic Plan Student Success Objectives and provides educators and communities with information to take action for student learning.

“The results are encouraging and show our focus moving in the right direction with college and career readiness measures remaining steady, including some growth in Science,” said Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “As we move forward, we will be very specific and purposeful in our approach to address the achievement gap and chronic absenteeism. We will take what we have learned about effective student-centered practices since 2005 and raise our implementation work to another level.”

While statewide overall results in English Language Arts, Math and Science have shown growth over the past three years; the results have been mixed compared to 2016:

  • Science – up 4 percentage points from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 46%)
  • Mathematics – no change from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 42%)
  • English Language Arts/Literacy – down 1 percentage point from 2016
    (2015: 48%; 2016: 51%; 2017: 50%)

While overall state results were stable, the following schools showed the most growth in English Language Arts and Math over the past three years (scroll to the bottom of the release for an extended list of top performing schools):

  • English Language Arts/Literacy – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Kauai High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 25%; 2016: 59%; 2017: 59%)
    • Kapaa High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 33%; 2016: 58%; 2017: 66%)
    • Kahuku High & Intermediate – up 15 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 20%; 2016: 54%; 2017: 50%)
    • Kaiser High: up 14 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 51%; 2016: 74%; 2017: 79%)
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 56%; 2016: 78%; 2017: 77%)
  • Math – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 47%; 2016: 72%; 2017: 81%)
    • Kohala High – up 16 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 15%; 2016: 22%; 2017: 47%)
    • Kapolei Elementary – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 30%; 2016: 52%; 2017: 56%)
    • Kealakehe High – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 19%; 2016: 39%; 2017: 44%)
    • Haleiwa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 49%; 2016: 49%; 2017: 71%)

Strive HI was launched in school year 2012-13 as the state’s locally designed performance system that was a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The accountability system includes multiple measures of school performance including proficiency in Science, Math and Language Arts/Literacy; chronic absenteeism; school climate; graduation rates; and achievement gaps. The system was modified earlier this year to address the federal requirements under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the revised DOE/BOE Strategic Plan. The law replaces both NCLB and the state’s waiver. ESSA requires full implementation including the provisions related to school accountability this school year.

English Language Arts and Math scores are derived from the Smarter Balanced Assessment, and Science scores are from the Hawaii State Assessment in Science.

Click here to view the 2016-17 State Snapshot of Strive HI indicators. For more information about the Strive HI performance system, click here.

Below are lists of top performers across indicators in the Strive HI System. Results for schools with small student populations are suppressed to protect student privacy.

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting English Language Arts/Literacy Standards
Statewide: 50%
Lanikai El 88%
Kaelepulu El 84%
Mililani Ike El 82%
Momilani El 81%
de Silva El 80%
Mililani Uka El 79%
Hickam El 79%
Kaiser High 79%
Koko Head El 78%
Pauoa El 77%
Manoa El 77%
Aina Haina El 77%
Roosevelt High 77%
Waikiki El 76%
Noelani El 75%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Math Standards

Statewide: 42%

Lanikai El 89%
Momilani El 87%
Pauoa El 81%
Noelani El 79%
Waikiki El 79%
Mililani Ike El 78%
Maemae El 76%
Wilson El 76%
Kaelepulu El 75%
Aliiolani El 75%
Mililani Mauka El 75%
Mililani Uka El 75%
Palisades El 74%
Laie El 73%
Pearl Ridge El 73%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Science Standards

Statewide: 46%

Lanikai El 98%
Maunawili El 96%
Haleiwa El 96%
Kaelepulu El 92%
Mililani Ike El 92%
Manoa El 91%
Maemae El 91%
Kamalii El 91%
Pearl City El 91%
Waikiki El 90%
Mililani Mauka El 89%
Hickam El 88%
Aikahi El 88%
Waiau El 88%
Koko Head El 87%

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in English Language Arts/Literacy Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Kauai High +17 percentage points
Kapaa High +17 percentage points
Kahuku High & Intermediate +15 percentage points
Kaiser High +14 percentage points
Pauoa El +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
SEEQS +10 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate +9 percentage points
Waiakea High +9 percentage points
Makawao El +9 percentage points
Kapolei El +9 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Kalaheo High +8 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle +8 percentage points
Na Wai Ola +7 percentage points
Kealakehe High +7 percentage points
​Highest Achieving Schools in Math Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Pauoa El +17 percentage points
Kohala High +16 percentage points
Kapolei El +13 percentage points
Kealakehe High +13 percentage points
Haleiwa El +11 percentage points
Aliiolani El +11 percentage points
Kauai High +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
Waiau El +9 percentage points
Kekaulike High +9 percentage points
Palolo El +9 percentage points
Waiahole El +8 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Wheeler Middle +8 percentage points
Highest Achieving Elementary Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Maunaloa El -21 percentage points
Mountain View El -6 percentage points
Keonepoko El -6 percentage points
Na Wai Ola -6 percentage points
Lincoln El -5 percentage points
Naalehu El -5 percentage points
Maunawili El -5 percentage points
Sunset Beach El -5 percentage points
Kamalii El -5 percentage points
Kamehameha III El -5 percentage points
Likelike El -4 percentage points
Konawaena El -4 percentage points
Waimalu El -4 percentage points
Waiahole El -4 percentage points
Royal El -4 percentage points
​Kalihi Waena El ​-4 percentage points
​Kaunakakai El ​-4 percentage points
Highest Achieving Middle Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Ilima Intermediate -5 percentage points
Wahiawa Middle -4 percentage points
Waiakea Intermediate -4 percentage points
Kapaa Middle -4 percentage points
Lahaina Intermediate -3 percentage points
Stevenson Middle -3 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle -3 percentage points
Iao Intermediate -3 percentage points
Highlands Intermediate -3 percentage points
Washington Middle -2 percentage points
Waimea Canyon Middle -1 percentage point
Waipahu Intermediate -1 percentage point
Kalakaua Middle -1 percentage point
Ka Umeke Kaeo -1 percentage point
Moanalua Middle -1 percentage point
 
Highest Achieving High Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Niihau O Kekaha -12 percentage points
KANAKA -8 percentage points
Kanu o ka Aina -7 percentage points
Laupahoehoe Community PCS -4 percentage points
Lahainaluna High -4 percentage points
Kekaulike High -4 percentage points
Kailua High -3 percentage points
Molokai High -3 percentage points
Anuenue -3 percentage points
Thompson Academy -3 percentage points
Kauai High -3 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate -2 percentage points
Mililani High -2 percentage points
Moanalua High -2 percentage points
Highest Achieving Schools in Graduation Rate (Four-Year Rate)
University Laboratory 100%
Thompson Academy 97%
Anuenue 97%
Moanalua High 95%
Ehunuikaimalino 95%
Mililani High 94%
Radford High 94%
Kauai High 90%
Kalani High 90%
Kapaa High 90%
​Highest Achieving Schools in College-Going Rate
16-month enrollment rate
University Laboratory 86%
Kalani High 81%
Roosevelt High 75%
Kaiser High 74%
Mililani High 72%
McKinley High 67%
Kalaheo High 66%
Moanalua High 64%
Radford High 61%
Pearl City High 60%
Waimea High 58%
​Hawaii Academy ​58%
​Kapaa High ​57%
​Kauai High ​57%
Molokai High 56%

Hawaii Public High Schools Initiate New Approach to Help Students Prepare for Future Education Opportunities

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) this month is initiating an unprecedented move designed to better prepare students for post-high school success.

DOE Release

Approximately 50,000 students in grades 8 through 11 will take the ACT College and Career Readiness assessment. The nationwide testing date for the ACT assessment test for high school juniors will take place on Tuesday, April 23. All other grades will be taking their tests over a two-week window that also begin on the same date.

With the ACT College and Career Readiness System, the DOE for the first time will be able to comprehensively collect and examine college and career readiness data in reading, mathematics, science and English.

“College and career readiness is a key cornerstone of student success,” says Keith Hayashi, principal, Waipahu High School. Mr. Hayashi recently won the Tokioka Excellence in Leadership Award among island public school principals. He developed several programs at Waipahu aimed at helping students achieve their college and career goals.

Mr. Hayashi added, “One of the Department’s strategies is to provide better data on students’ academic progress. This ACT test will help tremendously in that area.”

“The DOE’s decision to administer the ACT College and Career Readiness System for all students in 8 – 11th grades is evidence of their strong commitment to preparing students for post-secondary success,” said Karen Lee, Executive Director of Hawaii P-20 Partnerships for Education. “The data gathered from the assessments will be invaluable as we work together with institutions of higher education to reach the state’s goal of 55 percent of working age adults having a 2- or 4-year college degree in 2025.”

About the ACT

The tests for 11th graders will include all four of the areas, plus a writing section. The tests are designed to help students plan for future education opportunities and explore careers based on their skills, interests and ambitions.

Students in 8th and 9th grades will take the ACT EXPLORE; those in 10th grade will take the PLAN exam, and the ACT assessment in grade 11. The ACT College and Career Readiness System is benchmarked to both the expectations of higher education institutions and workforce.

  • EXPLORE (8th and 9th grade) serves as the entry measure of academic progress toward college and career readiness. It helps students understand and begin to explore the wide range of career options available.
  • PLAN (10th grade) is a midpoint assessment of academic progress toward college and career readiness. It’s a curriculum-based achievement test that measures college and career readiness, and is used for course placement as well.

The ACT aligns with Goal 1 of the DOE’s Strategic Plan. The Plan calls for specific measurable targets and goals for student achievement. It builds on key strengths and reform initiatives to ensure all students graduate ready to succeed in college or careers.

School communities, educators and students will benefit from ACT programs and services that reduce the need for remediation, align with state standards, and foster student success in postsecondary education. ACT’s unique student-level assessment data may also be used by counselors to improve the effectiveness of student-intervention plans.

In preparation for the tests, parents and students should be aware that each test is about four hours in duration. Cell phones of any type, and some calculators are not permitted in the testing areas as well. A website (http://www.act.org/aap/hawaii/) also provides more information about the testing. For more information about the ACT test, log on to http://www.act.org/aap/hawaii/.

The DOE Systems Accountability Office is leading the implementation of the ACT College and Career Readiness System. ACT, Inc. was awarded a contract totaling approximately $882,000 for the system’s assessment package, programs, and services for school year 2012-13.

To learn more about the DOE’s Strategic Plan and transformation in public education, please visit: http://hawaiidoe.org/curriculum/strategicplan2011-2018/update/index.htm.