81 Chefs Enjoy Culinary Lessons at the Mealani Taste of the Hawaiian Range

On Friday I had the opportunity to attend the 16th Annual Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range held at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. I’ll be posting more about the actual Taste of the Range later but I wanted to give credit to the 81 culinary students from both East and West Hawaii Community Colleges that came to the Pork and Beef seminars that were held before the “Taste”.

Pork Class

Students learning about pork on the Big Island

The classes were geared for culinary students and food industry professionals.

Listening intently to pork talk

Pork producer Lloyd Case joined Tom Asano of Hilo’s Kulana Foods and Hilton Waikoloa Village Executive Chef Charles Charbonneau to discuss the traditional cultural protocol and growing commercial use of feral and domestic hog in the Hawai‘i food service industry.

Pork producer Lloyd Case joins Tom Asano of Hilo’s Kulana Foods and Hilton Waikoloa Village Executive Chef Charles Charbonneau

Tom Asano (left) of Hilo’s Kulana Foods joins Pork producer Lloyd Case (Center) and Hilton Waikoloa Village Executive Chef Charles Charbonneau (Right)

The second seminar that began at 3:00 was titled “How to cook Grass-Feed Beef 101″ and the students moved over to the next ballroom to listen to the presentations there.

How to cook grass-fed beef 101

How to cook grass-fed beef 101

This year’s staged cooking demonstration headlined two presenters.

Cooking Demonstration

Cooking Demonstration

KTA’s Derek Kurisu of TV’s “Living in Paradise” and Chef Scott Hiraishi of Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai present tips for preparing and using forage-fed beef cuts.

KTA’s Derek Kurisu of TV’s “Living in Paradise” and Chef Scott Hiraishi of Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai

KTA’s Derek Kurisu (right) of TV’s “Living in Paradise” and Chef Scott Hiraishi (left) of Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai

Open to the public, ticketed attendees receive take-away recipes.

Cooking quiz contest winner

Cooking quiz contest winner

Derek, who founded KTA’s locally sourced Mountain Apple Brand, demontrated how to prepare Shortribs Delight and bone a chuckroll.

Got Beef

Got Beef?

Chef Hiraishi detailed how to deliciously use oxtail.

Oxtail specialty

Oxtail specialty

At the end of the presentations, the student cooks got to sample what was being prepared on stage.

Samples

Samples

“When Pigs Fly”… To Hawaii

Looks like PETA is stepping up their war against pork again.

About nine months  ago, before I had a blog,  I reported on another site that PETA was launching a campaign against pork being shipped to Hawaii and some of the inhumane practices that were being done.

In a Press Release released today by The World Society for the Protection of Animals, it states the following:

Misleading labels on pork products are causing Hawaii residents and tourists to unwittingly participate in inhumane practices against animals

Stressed and exhausted from overcrowded and often filthy conditions, thousands of pigs endure a more than week-long journey from the mainland United States only to be slaughtered on arrival in Honolulu. In 2008, a total of 13,082 pigs were imported from California, Iowa, Montana and South Dakota for slaughter. The purpose of this inhumane and costly practice is to produce meat that can be sold to unsuspecting consumers as “Island Produced Pork.

I myself think this is just a re-release of another similar press release that was released earlier this year.

Many local media sources picked up the story after I first reported on it before I started my blog.

Here is just one of the previous articles on it by Honolulu Magazine:

Stephen Schildbach

Illustration: Stephen Schildbach

Next time you buy pork at the supermarket with the label “Island produced” you may want to know what that actually means.

In 1973, the state Department of Agriculture declared that this phrase could only be placed on pork that came from pigs actually raised in Hawaii. But in 2000, the law was repealed due to its unenforceability, which made it legal for supermarkets and retailers to place “Island produced” on pigs that had only been shipped to the Islands and slaughtered here…

More here