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Hawaiian Cultural Experts Offer Insights To Hospitality Industry Managers and Employees

Presented April 6-7 by the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA).

Media Release:

Hawaiian cultural experts Peter Apo, Margo Harumi Mau Bunnell, Kumu Keala Ching, and Donna Wheeler, will present valuable insights into Hawaiian culture for hospitality industry managers and employees at the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) Ola Hawai’i workshops April 6-7.

The speakers will share knowledge on a range of topics including “Understanding Hawaiian Values” and “Where to Find Real Hawaiian Culture.”

  • Peter Apo is a songwriter-musician, President of Mamo Records and a Trustee of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. He was a founding member of NaHHA and was Special Assistant on Hawaiian Affairs to former Governor Ben Cayetano.
  • Margo Mau Bunnell is the Sales and Operations Manager for Queens MarketPlace at Waikoloa Beach Resort and CEO of the Moku O Keawe Foundation.
  • Kumu Keala Ching is a Hawaiian cultural educator, composer and spiritual advisor to Hawaiian organizations. He is fluent in the Hawaiian language and is Kumu Hula for Ka Pa Hula Na Wai Iwi Ola.
  • Donna Wheeler has over thirty years of experience in the Hawaii hotel industry having served in operations, sales and marketing capacities, representing over 60 hotels and resorts on the Hawaiian islands of O’ahu, Maui, Kaua’i, Hawai’i Island and Moloka’i; as well as New Zealand, Guam, Saipan, and Thailand.

The two-day learning experience will explore the value of hosting, managing visitor information and sales and marketing strategies with a special focus on Hawaiian traditions and culture.

Also speaking at the workshop will be:

  • Veronica Puanani Claveran – Director of Rooms, Keauhou Beach Resort
  • Owana Wilcox-Likiaksa – Human Resources Coordinator, Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Joann Nanea Perreira-Machiguchi – Catering Sales Manager, Hawai`i Prince Hotel
  • April Ke`ala Kadooka – Learning Manager, Four Seasons Hualalai

The Ola Hawai’i workshop will be held on April 6-7 from 9am – 5pm at the Keauhou Beach Resort, Keauhou , Hawai’i Island.

Enrollment is limited and participants need to register by March 28. The cost, which includes lunch on both days, is $60.

For more information, visit nahha.com

For registration or questions, contact Pamela Davis-Lee at 808-628-6375 or pam@nahha.com

The Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) is dedicated to the promotion and perpetuation of Hawaiian culture and traditions. Its mission is to promote Hawaiian culture, values and traditions in the workplace through consultation and education, and to provide opportunities for the Native Hawaiian community to shape the future of tourism.

Wanted: Big Island Locals for Grassroots’ “Adopt a Visitor” Program

Big Island resident Tim Sullivan has been quite successful in bridging the gap between many Japanese visitors that come to Hawaii and local community groups and projects that have happened on the Big Island.

A while back, he and I exchanged some dialog about tourism here on the Big Island and a way to possibly get folks to come to the Big Island and see the Big Island in a real way… not just some touristy way.

He brought up the subject again today in his blog posting “Straddling Paradigms: Redistribution of Wealth Through Grassroots’ Capitalism” where he ask the 5 following questions based on Peter Apo’s Pono Prism:

  1. How does the activity make Hawaii a better place?
  2. How does the activity create opportunities for prosperity for all segments of the community?
  3. How does the activity help connect the community’s past to its future?
  4. How does the activity bring dignity to the community and the people who live around it?
  5. How does the activity insure that the people who live in and around it can continue to live there?

Tim has some great answers to these questions that you can view on his blog.

He also surprised me by his apparent willingness to possibly embrace Social-Media and online tools such as Facebook and Twitter.

…Love it or hate it, on-line social media looks like it’s here to stay. Most folks I know seem to be passionately for or against: got some friends who believe Facebook is the Devil (digitally) incarnate, and others who swear by it (my two sons included)…

Well with the recent announcement that the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau is in Los Angeles next week promoting Hawaii in the following fashion:

…To activate the social media network in Los Angeles, HVCB will be reaching out to bloggers, podcasters, and emerging media enthusiasts to assist them in developing content about the islands to share with their audiences. On the evening of September 2, HVCB and Marriott Resorts Hawaii will co-host a “tweetup” (gathering of Twitter users) at The Whisper Restaurant and Lounge at The Grove to further promote Hawaii’s uniqueness as a vacation destination to the area’s most active new media users…

I think now is a good time to really look at what we folks locally at a grassroots level can do to help our islands economy out in the long run.

Not only that… I need a job!

So go check out his post and be sure to get all the way down to “The Bottom Line“.