• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    June 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930

Animal Control Activities and Temporary Closure of Mauna Kea Forest Reserve

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve (Unit K), Palila Mitigation Lands, and the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawai‘i.

Palila Bird

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawai‘i.

Control schedules are May 10 and 11, 2017.  Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve, Palila Mitigation Lands, the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

  • 7 a.m. May 10, 2017
  • 6 a.m. May 11, 2017

These actions are pursuant to Hawai‘i Administrative Rules Ch. 13-130-19 and § 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.  The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

Locked 7 p.m. May 9, 2017, and reopened 7 p.m. May 11, 2017.

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted from 9 a.m. May 3, 2017, to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.  Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.  A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Pu‘u Ko‘ohi location and 15 permitted vehicles at the Pu‘u Mali location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicles are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

Salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On May 10, 2017, at Pu‘u Ko‘ohi. Permittees must meet at Mauna Kea Recreation Area at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On May 11, 2017, at Pu‘u Mali. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.

Free Carcasses: 4-Wheel Drive Vehicles Required

DLNR PLANS ANIMAL CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN PALILA HABITAT, Temporary closures set for Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, palila mitigation lands, and Kaohe Game Management Area

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), palila mitigation lands, and the Ka’ohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawai’i.

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=202675488770027200871.0004b867a4eaae7c1e353&ie=UTF8&t=m&ll=19.80158,-155.609864&spn=0.06624,0.090241&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawai’i.

Control schedules are January 22 and 23, 2014; February 5 and 6; 2014 and March 19 and 20, 2014.

Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, palila mitigation lands, the Ka’ohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

7 a.m. January 22, February 5, and March 19, 2014
6 a.m. January 23, February 6, and March 20, 2014

These actions are pursuant to Hawai’i Administrative Rules Chapters 13-130-19 and 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.

The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

Locked 7 p.m. January 21, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. January 23, 2014
Locked 7 p.m. February 4, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. February 6, 2014
Locked 7 p.m., March 18, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. March 20, 2014

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted up to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.

Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.

A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Pu‘u Ko‘ohi location and 10 permitted vehicles at the Kaluamakani location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicle are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

The following meat salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On January 22, February 5, and March 19, 2014, at Pu’u Ko’ohi. Permittees must meet at Mauna Kea State Park at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On January 23, February 6, and March 20, 2014, at Kaluamakani. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.

Jason Scott Lee Featured in Effort to Save the Palila, a Highly Endangered Hawaiian Bird

Jason Scott Lee, star of 25 motion pictures and raised in Hawai‘i, has lent his voice to a new public service announcement aimed at helping to save the highly endangered Palila (Loxioides bailleui). This bird is found only in a small patch of mamane forest on Mauna Kea volcano on Hawai‘i Island.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/UkWdixe-8oU]

The Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resource’s Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) and American Bird Conservancy (ABC) have initiated a new outreach campaign that features the PSA which began airing statewide this week, and which will also be available soon for viewing at: RestoreMaunaKea.org. Lee is the voice of the Palila in this brief overview describing the causes for the bird’s declining population and management efforts to help save it.

“Not many people are familiar with what a Palila is and why they are worth saving. That’s because they live in remote and rugged terrain that few people ever visit,” said Robert Stephens, Coordinator for DOFAW’s Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project.

The Palila is a gorgeous, unique Hawaiian treasure, but unfortunately not enough people are aware of its precarious situation. We believe educating people about the importance of this species and the threats we are managing today, will build local and national support for the actions necessary to preserve this bird for future generations. --  Chris Farmer, American Bird Conservancy’s Science Coordinator for Hawai‘i.  Photo by R. Kohley.

The Palila is a gorgeous, unique Hawaiian treasure, but unfortunately not enough people are aware of its precarious situation. We believe educating people about the importance of this species and the threats we are managing today, will build local and national support for the actions necessary to preserve this bird for future generations. — Chris Farmer, American Bird Conservancy’s Science Coordinator for Hawai‘i. Photo by R. Kohley.

“What makes Palila special is that they are a classic example of the spectacular evolutionary process that occurred in the remoteness of the Hawaiian Islands. They survived in the dry forests for thousands of years by adapting to a food source, mamane pods, that is toxic to other wildlife. Palila belong here and are one of the things that makes Hawai‘i one of the most amazing places on the planet.”

In January 2014, a 9 x 12-foot mural featuring Palila and mamane will be completed for display on a prominent building in downtown Hilo, the county seat and largest city on the island.

The Palila has been loved by Hawaiians since ancient times and, along with other native species, they formed the environment that influenced the formation of a unique culture. Queen Emma visited Mauna Kea in the early 1880s, and a series of mele (chants) commemorate the event, including one describing the memorable song of Palila (from Nogelmeier 2001, He Lei no Emalani: Chants for Queen Emma Kaleleonalani).

“E aha ana lâ ‘Emalani – “What is Emmalani doing there?
I ka wai kapu a Lilinoe  – At the sacred water of Lilinoe?
E nanea, e walea a‘e ana – She is relaxing and she is enjoying
I ka hone mai a ka palila – The soothing song of the palila,
Oia manu noho Kuahiwi” – Those birds that dwell upon the Mountain.”

The population of the Palila, a Hawaiian honeycreeper, has declined 66 percent in the past decade, with fewer than 2,200 birds currently left. The Palila’s downward population slide is a result of habitat degradation, predation, and severe drought conditions that are causing reductions in food supply.

With critical support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is replacing the fence that encircles the majority of Palila critical habitat on Mauna Kea to prevent sheep and goats on adjacent lands from entering protected areas, while also removing the non-native ungulates from within the fence that destroy the native forests. Photo by Robert Stephens, Coordinator for DOFAW’s Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project

With critical support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is replacing the fence that encircles the majority of Palila critical habitat on Mauna Kea to prevent sheep and goats on adjacent lands from entering protected areas, while also removing the non-native ungulates from within the fence that destroy the native forests. Photo by Robert Stephens, Coordinator for DOFAW’s Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project

The native mamane and naio forests upon which the Palila depends have been degraded by non-native feral sheep, goats, cattle, and hybrid mouflon sheep over the past 200 years. The Palila once lived across most of the Island of Hawai‘i, but its range has shrunk to roughly 5 percent of its historical size. Other threats include long-term drought influenced by climate change, non-native, feral cats and mongooses that prey on adults and nestlings, fire, and invasive non-native plants. In a series of court orders beginning in 1979, the U.S. District Court for the District of Hawai‘i ruled that to prevent the bird’s extinction, the Department of Land and Natural Resources must permanently remove non-native ungulates (grazing mammals) from the Palila’s designated Critical Habitat on Mauna Kea through all necessary means, including fencing and aerial hunts.

“The Department of Land and Natural Resources is committed to protecting and conserving Hawai‘i’s unique natural, cultural and historic resources which are held in public trust for current and future generations of the people of Hawai‘i nei. We hope our children’s children will be able to know the soothing song of the Palila,” said William Aila, DLNR Chairperson.

DOFAW, with critical support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is replacing the fence that encircles the majority of Palila critical habitat on Mauna Kea to prevent sheep and goats on adjacent lands from entering protected areas, while also removing the non-native ungulates from within the fence that destroy the native forests. In addition, DOFAW, the Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project, ABC, and hundreds of local volunteers are restoring and replanting Mauna Kea’s mamane forest, which Palila depend upon for about 90% of their diet.

“The Palila is a gorgeous, unique Hawaiian treasure, but unfortunately not enough people are aware of its precarious situation,” said Chris Farmer, American Bird Conservancy’s Science Coordinator for Hawai‘i. “We believe educating people about the importance of this species and the threats we are managing today, will build local and national support for the actions necessary to preserve this bird for future generations.”

Aerial Shooting, Trapping and Hunting to Begin to Protect Native Bird

Temporary closures set for Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, palila mitigation lands, and Kaohe Game Management Area.

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wildlife will conduct animal control activities – specifically, trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids, staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters – within Palila Critical Habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), Palila Mitigation Lands, and Kaohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawaii for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids.

A Palila Bird

A Palila Bird

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawaii.

Control schedules are as follows: Oct. 1, 2, and 31; Nov. 1; and Dec. 19 and 20, 2013.

Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, Palila Mitigation Lands, Kaohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted, and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

7 a.m. Oct. 1, 2013 – 7 p.m. Oct. 2, 2013
7 a.m. Oct. 31, 2013 – 7 p.m. Nov. 1, 2013
7 a.m. Dec. 19, 2013 – 7 p.m. Dec. 20, 2013.

These actions are pursuant to Hawaii Administrative Rules Chapters 13-130-19 and 13-104-23(a)(3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.

The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Park will be locked/reopened as follows:

Locked 7 p.m. Sept. 30, 2013, and reopened 5 a.m. Oct. 3, 2013
Locked 7 p.m. Oct. 30, 2013, and reopened 5 a.m. Nov. 2, 2013
Locked 7 p.m., Dec. 18, 2013 and reopen 5 a.m. Dec. 21, 2013.

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

In an effort to provide the public use of the animals for consumption, carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the location listed below (four-wheel drive vehicle required and access permits will be issued). However, there is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted from 9 a.m. Sept. 18, 2013, to10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only. Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in. A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Puu Koohi location and 10 permitted vehicles at the Kaluamakani location.

Salvage locations are subject to change:
Salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On Oct. 1 and 31, and Dec. 19, 2013 at Puu Koohi. Permittees must meet at Mauna Kea State Park at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On Oct. 2, Nov. 1, and Dec. 20, 2013 at Kaluamakani. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

For additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits, contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or, in Kamuela, at (808) 887-6063.

Palila Honeycreeper Moved from Endangered to Critically Endangered by the American Bird Conservancy

…News from the IUCN for New Zealand’s Chatham Petrel was also good, and it was downlisted from Critically Endangered to Endangered. Unfortunately, the report also uplisted the Hooded Grebe to Endangered, and the newly discovered Gorgeted Puffleg , the Medium Tree-Finch (one of Darwin’s finches from the Galapagos), and the Palila (a Hawaiian honeycreeper), to Critically Endangered. A total of 1,227 bird species (12 percent) are now classified as globally threatened with extinction (includes Critically Endangered, Endangered, and Vulnerable). Of those, 192 are considered Critically Endangered…

palila

More Here

Coincidentally, just last month there was a bit of controversy about hunters doing aerial hunts on goats and sheep that were ruining the forests up on top of Mauna Kea.

The state plans to conduct an aerial hunt of invasive goats and sheep in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve next week to protect the endangered palila bird…