Lauhala Symposium at Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo North Hawai‘i Education and Research Center (NHERC) and Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (HPA) invite the public to a “Symposium on Sustainability and Traditional Pacific Island Arts: The Art of Lauhala, Form and Function,” on May 3 & 4 at the HPA Gates Performing Arts Center. There is no charge for May 3, but there is a $55 fee for May 4.

From the Hawaii State Archives

Girls Weaving Lauhala. From the Hawaii State Archives

The purpose of the symposium is to celebrate and educate people on the important role lauhala fiber work traditions played in the settlement and development of the Pacific region. The two-day event includes lectures, talk story sessions, a fiber arts exhibition, and weaving workshops and demonstrations given by some of Hawaiʻi’s leading lauhala fiber artists.

Date: ca. 1910 Photographer: Gartley, Alonzo, 1869-1921

Date: ca. 1910
Photographer: Gartley, Alonzo, 1869-1921

Special focus will be given to the role native Hawaiian weavers from Hawaiʻi Island have played over the last century in the development and perpetuation of this fiber art form, especially in the making of lauhala hats. A highlight will be a talk story session with Kona resident and master weaver Aunty Elizabeth Lee, who is the founder and director of Ka Ulu Lauhala O Kona, an organization dedicated to perpetuating the art of lauhala weaving.

Call NHERC at 775-8890 for event details.

 

Call for Proposals & Abstracts for the 21st Annual Hawaii Conservation Conference

Call for Proposals & Abstracts for the 21st Annual Hawaii Conservation Conference, Living Today, Sustaining Tomorrow: Connecting People, Places and Planet July 16th – 18th, 2013 at the Hawai`i Convention Center.

Hawaii Conservation Conference

Session and Abstract Proposal Deadline: January 21, 2013      Revisions Deadline: March 15, 2013

2013 marks the 21st annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference (HCC) allowing us the opportunity to bolster island conservation in Hawai‘i and wider Pacific Islands. Highlights include:  thought provoking keynote speakers; innovative panels and forums; a community event, novel lunch & reception, training opportunities, and more. Join us in celebrating the 21st annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference!

TRACKS & SESSION TOPICS

The HCC organizing committee is soliciting proposals for symposia, forums, workshops, trainings and individual oral or poster presentations in the following six tracks. Integrated approaches to research and management that involve community and cultural knowledge and approaches as a best practice will be given priority ranking.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 141

1. Practicing Laulima (many hands): Building of Bridges between Ecosystems and Society

Human well-being is inextricably linked to the natural world through a myriad of exchanges – most of which go unnoticed or are under-appreciated in modern times.  Radical changes in land use and natural resource governance over the past century has resulted in rapid degradation of our native ecosystems, alienating changes in human relationships to the land and sea, and a common disassociation with our natural world. Management and research organizations need to better understand the context of this history in order to better measure, and share the value of ecosystem services and, in turn, build a broader base of support for and engagement in effective conservation and management.This Track will focuson sharing lessons and experiences (good and bad) from efforts to build bridges among the diverse communities by providing credible and robust information on the links between ecosystem management and the attainment of economic and social goals. Sessions will demonstrate that conservation and management efforts that take a laulima (cooperative) approach are more likely to succeed, and will provide detailed experiences on how the whole can indeed be greater than the sum of the parts.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 137

2. Safeguarding Sacred Places: Restoration and Protection of Managed Areas

Hawaiʻi is blessed with many special places set aside for their importance, bio-cultural resources, and unique characteristics.  These protected areas are found on the highest peaks, deep ocean, and everywhere in between.  Protected areas are microcosms of larger ecosystems and landscapes. At the same time, Hawaii’s extensive systems of protected federal, state and privately or community-owned and -managed lands and waters provide critical ecosystem system services that sustain us.  They also serve as important sources of native species used in restoration elsewhere. To be effective and successful, their managers must deal with both the issues that pervade conservation issues in Hawaiʻi: invasive species, loss of ecosystem function, climatic change, population effects, and the socio-cultural needs of community. This track will focus on place-based conservation occurring in our protected areas.  Sessions will demonstrate the importance of place-based conservation, the differences between place-based and issue-based conservation, ecosystem services provided by protected areas, the importance of refugia, and need for community stewardship.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 105

3.  Invertebrates:  Gems of Pacific Island Ecosystems

With their incredible abundance, diversity, and distribution, invertebrates – both on land and in the sea – are the ties that bind our island ecosystems together.  Our amazing endemic species are not only vital food sources, pollinators, and decomposers, but serve as indicators of ecosystem health, harbingers of global climate change, and icons of cultural significance. The incredible physiological and behavioral adaptations that have made our native invertebrate species so unique also put them and the ecosystems that they support, at great risk. Track and sessions will focus on illustrating the role of invertebrates in sustaining our natural, agricultural, and urban ecosystems and their cultural importance into the future, and include demonstrations of achievements in research, conservation, and management.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 075

4. Oceans and Shorelines: Where Conservation Meets Everyday People

Hawaii’s human history is based on the ocean.  From the earliest Native Hawaiians who settled here to people today, our shorelines and nearshore waters are the places where conservation most directly meets people – as the provider for food, transportation, recreation, livelihood, and settlement. Unfortunately, with declining fishery resources, rising sea levels, warming ocean temperatures, ocean acidification and pollution, the health of our oceans are changing rapidly, requiring us to focus more attention on how these changes will affect us and what we have to do to increase the resiliency of both ecosystems and human communities. Increased attention and focus on marine conservation will aid Hawaii’s conservation community in increasing our relevance to people and communities.  This track is aimed at: mainstreaming marine conservation issues and successes within the broader conservation community; highlighting successful mauka-makai conservation approaches; sharing new initiatives and innovations aimed at enhancing food security and restoring fisheries in Hawai’i and larger Pacific region; and focusing attention on the cultural importance of the ocean to Hawaii’s people.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 069

5. Connecting People to Place: Bio-Cultural Foundations and Innovations in Resource Management

In Hawaiian conservation, there are cultural connections to the places we work. As such there is also a wealth of cultural knowledge tied to the history and people of these places upon which to draw from in order to increase our conservation success.  This track will focus on both the foundations of culturally integrated conservation, as well as examples of cultural innovations to conservation in Hawaiʻi. Sessions are aimed at bio-cultural innovations and approaches to conservation, including integration of biology, culture, land-use history, community-based stewardship, and all that is rooted in aloha ʻāina.

Hawaii Conservation Confernece 068

6. Collaboration Across Sectors: Island Leadership in Defining the New “Green (and Blue) Economy”   

What sectors need to be involved in green initiatives, and how can island communities encourage cross-sector dialogue to promote effective developments in clean energy, food security, and the environment?

This track will focus on islands as microcosms for the world’s sustainability challenges.  It will highlight how Hawai`i is defining green growth to include sound management of our natural resources from the mountains to the sea and advancing innovative green growth initiatives through multi-sector and international collaborations. Sessions will demonstrate unique partnerships, programs and projects that will lead to a greener economy with more opportunities for green jobs.

WORKSHOPS/TRAININGS

Organizations and practitioners are welcome to conduct trainings (see “Conservation Campus” below) and workshops before or following the conference. While Hawaii Conservation Alliance (HCA) can contribute minimal logistical support, the facilitating organization(s) is responsible for organizing and supporting most aspects of their training or workshop. Please contact us for details about this new capacity building opportunity.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Session Proposal & Abstract Deadline: January 21, 2013

Revisions Due: March 15, 2013

SESSION PROPOSALS AND ABSTRACTS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE. THE SUBMISSION FORM IS NOW AVAILABLE AT:

https://hawaii.conference-services.net/authorlogin.asp?conferenceID=3464&language=en-uk

FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

Symposium: a formal moderated session with 4-5 presentations organized around a topic or theme; individual presentation time is limited to 20 minutes; moderator introduces presenters and conducts Q&A session at end of session. Time limit: 2 hours per session. Abstracts for each presenter are required and due Jan 21, 2013, along with a complete session agenda.

Forum: A less formal, interactive panel or roundtable session organized around a topic or theme; moderator guides presenters’ discussion and conducts Q&A session with audience during or after presentations. Time limit: 2 hours per session, with a minimum of :30 for audience participation. Abstracts for each presenter are not required unless requested by the forum organizer/chair.

Workshop: An interactive, highly facilitated, “hands on” session that minimizes formal presentations and emphasizes the application of information and/or technology. Active audience participation is encouraged. Subject categories may include: Education & Outreach, Community Engagement, Career & Skills Development, Management Tool Applications, etc. To register, one cohesive workshop abstract is required that describes engagement technique used by the person(s) facilitating the workshop. Hawaii-based workshop facilitators must be registered participants.

Conservation Campus: This an opportunity for organizations to host capacity building trainings and activities that focus on a specific skills transfer to conservation practitioners, teachers, etc or a time to engage a specific audience in a particular topic related to our larger theme (i.e. GIS analysis, integration of conservation in the classroom for teachers). A description is required to explain the goals and target audience of the training. Hawaii-based training facilitators must be registered conference participants. Trainings may occur on the weekend before or after the conference.

Oral and Poster Presentation Abstracts

Formal, individual presentations on various conservation topics will be scheduled in one of the following sessions depending on the abstract content. On the abstract submission form, you will be asked to choose a preferred presentation format (oral or poster) and identify the status of your project: information or news item; project/idea under development; completed project with data and results. In some cases, the review committee may suggest that you change your preferred format depending on the content of your abstract, available time in the program, and available space in the exhibit hall. All oral and poster presenters must be registered participants.

Oral presentations:

a.) 20-minute individual presentations (16-minute talk, 3 minutes Q&A, 1 minute for transition time)

b.) 10-minute individual presentations (7-minute talk, 2 minutes Q&A, and 1 minute for transition time).

Oral presentations will be scheduled into 2-hour sessions concluding with a 20-minute Q&A session. The 10-minute presentation format is appropriate for a topic of broad appeal, a new project or innovative idea, a recent success, a news story or update.

Poster presentation: This is a visual presentation to showcase your work to conference attendees throughout the entire conference. Posters are particularly useful as a way to present quantitative research. More than one participant may author a poster, but at least one of the primary authors must be in attendance to discuss the poster at the Opening Reception July 16th.

For more information Contact HCA Program Coordinator, Shelley Steele  808-687-6152  coordinator@hawaiiconservation.org

 

2013 Hawai’i Conservation Conference – Call for Proposals and Abstracts

2013 marks the 21st anniversary of the annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference (HCC) allowing us the opportunity to bolster island conservation in Hawai‘i and wider Pacific Islands. Highlights include: thought provoking keynote speakers; innovative panels and forums; a community event, novel lunch & reception, training opportunities, and more.

Hawaii Conservation Alliance Executive Director Lihla Noori and Anuhea with the youngest attendee of the 2012 Hawaii Conservation Conference

CALL FOR PROPOSALS & ABSTRACTS

Living Today, Sustaining Tomorrow: Connecting People, Places and Planet, July 16th – 18th, 2013       Hawai`i Convention Center, Honolulu, HI

Session and Abstract Proposal Deadline: January 21, 2013      Revisions Deadline: March 15, 2013

Join us in celebrating the 21st annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference! If you are interested in sustaining our natural resources for current and future generations and would like to share your topic of expertise with the conservation community in Hawai‘i and the wider Pacific Region, the Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance would like to  request your proposals and abstracts for the 2013 Hawai‘i Conservation Conference!

See the official call below, or download it from our website: HERE.

If you have any questions, please contact 808-687-6152 or coordinator@hawaiiconservation.org

TRACKS & SESSION TOPICS

The HCC organizing committee is soliciting proposals for sessions, forums, workshops, trainings and individual oral or poster presentations in the following six tracks. Integrated approaches to research and management that involve community and cultural knowledge and approaches as a best practice will be given priority ranking.

1. Practicing Laulima (many hands): Building of Bridges between Ecosystems and Society

Human well-being is inextricably linked to the natural world through a myriad of exchanges – most of which go unnoticed or are under-appreciated in modern times.  Radical changes in land use and natural resource governance over the past century has resulted in rapid degradation of our native ecosystems, alienating changes in human relationships to the land and sea, and a common disassociation with our natural world. Management and research organizations need to better understand the context of this history in order to better measure, and share the value of ecosystem services and, in turn, build a broader base of support for and engagement in effective conservation and management.This Track will focuson sharing lessons and experiences (good and bad) from efforts to build bridges among the diverse communities by providing credible and robust information on the links between ecosystem management and the attainment of economic and social goals. Sessions will demonstrate that conservation and management efforts that take a laulima (cooperative) approach are more likely to succeed, and will provide detailed experiences on how the whole can indeed be greater than the sum of the parts.

2. Safeguarding Sacred Places: Restoration and Protection of Managed Areas

Hawaiʻi is blessed with many special places set aside for their importance, bio-cultural resources, and unique characteristics.  These protected areas are found on the highest peaks, deep ocean, and everywhere in between.  Protected areas are microcosms of larger ecosystems and landscapes. At the same time, Hawaii’s extensive systems of protected federal, state and privately or community-owned and -managed lands and waters provide critical ecosystem system services that sustain us.  They also serve as important sources of native species used in restoration elsewhere. To be effective and successful, their managers must deal with both the issues that pervade conservation issues in Hawaiʻi: invasive species, loss of ecosystem function, climatic change, population effects, and the socio-cultural needs of community. This track will focus on place-based conservation occurring in our protected areas.  Sessions will demonstrate the importance of place-based conservation, the differences between place-based and issue-based conservation, ecosystem services provided by protected areas, the importance of refugia, and need for community stewardship.

3.  Invertebrates:  Gems of Pacific Island Ecosystems

With their incredible abundance, diversity, and distribution, invertebrates – both on land and in the sea – are the ties that bind our island ecosystems together.  Our amazing endemic species are not only vital food sources, pollinators, and decomposers, but serve as indicators of ecosystem health, harbingers of global climate change, and icons of cultural significance. The incredible physiological and behavioral adaptations that have made our native invertebrate species so unique also put them and the ecosystems that they support, at great risk. Track and sessions will focus on illustrating the role of invertebrates in sustaining our natural, agricultural, and urban ecosystems and their cultural importance into the future, and include demonstrations of achievements in research, conservation, and management.

4. Oceans and Shorelines: Where Conservation Meets Everyday People

Hawaii’s human history is based on the ocean.  From the earliest Native Hawaiians who settled here to people today, our shorelines and nearshore waters are the places where conservation most directly meets people – as the provider for food, transportation, recreation, livelihood, and settlement. Unfortunately, with declining fishery resources, rising sea levels, warming ocean temperatures, ocean acidification and pollution, the health of our oceans are changing rapidly, requiring us to focus more attention on how these changes will affect us and what we have to do to increase the resiliency of both ecosystems and human communities. Increased attention and focus on marine conservation will aid Hawaii’s conservation community in increasing our relevance to people and communities.  This track is aimed at: mainstreaming marine conservation issues and successes within the broader conservation community; highlighting successful mauka-makai conservation approaches; sharing new initiatives and innovations aimed at enhancing food security and restoring fisheries in Hawai’i and larger Pacific region; and focusing attention on the cultural importance of the ocean to Hawaii’s people.

5. Connecting People to Place: Bio-Cultural Foundations and Innovations in Resource Management

In Hawaiian conservation, there are cultural connections to the places we work. As such there is also a wealth of cultural knowledge tied to the history and people of these places upon which to draw from in order to increase our conservation success.  This track will focus on both the foundations of culturally integrated conservation, as well as examples of cultural innovations to conservation in Hawaiʻi. Sessions are aimed at bio-cultural innovations and approaches to conservation, including integration of biology, culture, land-use history, community-based stewardship, and all that is rooted in aloha ʻāina.

6. Collaboration Across Sectors: Island Leadership in Defining the New “Green (and Blue) Economy”

What sectors need to be involved in green initiatives, and how can island communities encourage cross-sector dialogue to promote effective developments in clean energy, food security, and the environment?

This track will focus on islands as microcosms for the world’s sustainability challenges.  It will highlight how Hawai`i is defining green growth to include sound management of our natural resources from the mountains to the sea and advancing innovative green growth initiatives through multi-sector and international collaborations. Sessions will demonstrate unique partnerships, programs and projects that will lead to a greener economy with more opportunities for green jobs.

WORKSHOPS/TRAININGS

Organizations and practitioners are welcome to conduct trainings (see “Conservation Campus” below) and workshops before or following the conference. While Hawaii Conservation Alliance (HCA) can contribute minimal logistical support, the facilitating organization(s) is responsible for organizing and supporting most aspects of their training or workshop. Please contact us for details about this new capacity building opportunity.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Session Proposal & Abstract Deadline: January 21, 2013

Session proposals and abstracts must be submitted online. The submission form will be available on the HCA website in early December, 2012: www.hawaiiconservation.org

FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS

Symposium: a formal moderated session with 4-5 presentations organized around a topic or theme; individual presentation time is limited to 20 minutes; moderator introduces presenters and conducts Q&A session at end of session. Time limit: 2 hours per session. Abstracts for each presenter are required and due Jan 21, 2013, along with a complete session agenda.

Forum: A less formal, interactive panel or roundtable session organized around a topic or theme; moderator guides presenters’ discussion and conducts Q&A session with audience during or after presentations. Time limit: 2 hours per session, with a minimum of :30 for audience participation. Abstracts for each presenter are not required unless requested by the forum organizer/chair.

Workshop: An interactive, highly facilitated, “hands on” session that minimizes formal presentations and emphasizes the application of information and/or technology. Active audience participation is encouraged. Subject categories may include: Education & Outreach, Community Engagement, Career & Skills Development, Management Tool Applications, etc. To register, one cohesive workshop abstract is required that describes engagement technique used by the person(s) facilitating the workshop. Hawaii-based workshop facilitators must be registered participants.

Conservation Campus: This an opportunity for organizations to host capacity building trainings and activities that focus on a specific skills transfer to conservation practitioners, teachers, etc or a time to engage a specific audience in a particular topic related to our larger theme (i.e. GIS analysis, integration of conservation in the classroom for teachers). A description is required to explain the goals and target audience of the training. Hawaii-based training facilitators must be registered conference participants. Trainings may occur on the weekend before or after the conference.

Oral and Poster Presentation Abstracts

Formal, individual presentations on various conservation topics will be scheduled in one of the following sessions depending on the abstract content. On the abstract submission form, you will be asked to choose a preferred presentation format (oral or poster) and identify the status of your project: information or news item; project/idea under development; completed project with data and results. In some cases, the review committee may suggest that you change your preferred format depending on the content of your abstract, available time in the program, and available space in the exhibit hall. All oral and poster presenters must be registered participants.

Oral presentations:

a.) 20-minute individual presentations (16-minute talk, 3 minutes Q&A, 1 minute for transition time)

b.) 10-minute individual presentations (7-minute talk, 2 minutes Q&A, and 1 minute for transition time).

Oral presentations will be scheduled into 2-hour sessions concluding with a 20-minute Q&A session. The 10-minute presentation format is appropriate for a topic of broad appeal, a new project or innovative idea, a recent success, a news story or update.

Poster presentation: This is a visual presentation to showcase your work to conference attendees throughout the entire conference. Posters are particularly useful as a way to present quantitative research. More than one participant may author a poster, but at least one of the primary authors must be in attendance to discuss the poster at the Opening Reception July 16th.

For more information Contact HCA Program Coordinator, Shelley Steele  808-687-6152  coordinator@hawaiiconservation.org

Six Turtles Released Into Freedom Today – Turtle Independence Day

Today the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows was pleased to release six Honu into the freedom of the ocean in front of a crowd of around 1,000 people.

Senator Daniel Kahikina Akaka was one of the turtle releasers along with his family.

Attendees enjoyed Hawaiian entertainment and a July 4 BBQ afterwards.

The sea turtle is the only indigenous reptile of Hawaii , evolving some 180 million years ago, and has become a significant symbol of the Islands .  It represents longevity, safety and Mana (spiritual energy) and Native Hawaiians consider it the bearer of good luck and peace.

Since 1989 Mauna Lani Bay has received 3-5 month old juvenile Honu from Oahu’s Sea Life Park and has raised them in the saltwater ponds of the resort.  The Honu are raised for 2-3 years and attentively cared for until they grow to a size and weight that is classified as healthy for release into the ocean.

More than 200 Honu have been released into the pristine waters in front of the resort since the program’s inception.

While Turtle Independence Day is fun-filled day for the whole family, it’s also an opportunity to raise awareness of the need to preserve and protect the Honu through education in the spirit of aloha.

Mayor Kenoi Will be Featured at the Statewide 2012 Hawai‘i Family Financial Empowerment Symposium in Waikiki

Hawai‘i Island communities are welcome to attend the 2012 Hawai‘i Family Financial Empowerment Symposium on June 27 – 29 at the Waikīkī Marriott on O‘ahu.

This special event is an opportunity for attendees to deepen their understanding of how to further empower families and communities to be self-sufficient. Symposium activities include: place-based learning workshops (huaka‘i) centered on the unique challenges in Hawai‘i; self-actualization through education and entrepreneurship; and exploration of strategies and tools for building financial security and ending generational poverty.

The cost of attendance is $275 for general admission, $125 for non-profit admission, and $50 for student admission. The Symposium will include presentations, workshops, meals and the huaka‘i. Please visit assetshawaii.org for more information and to complete the registration form. Registration forms may also be emailed to hoowaiwai@hacbed.org or faxed to (808) 534-1199.

The symposium will feature Hawai‘i County Mayor Billy Kenoi; Hawai‘i Island youth and families; Native Hawaiian practitioners; City Delegates from the Cities for Financial Empowerment; MA‘O Farms; and other community, public and private agencies.

This special event is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Island Ho‘owaiwai Network, whose mission it is to empower families and communities in wealth and asset building, and the Hawai‘i Alliance for Community-Based Economic Development [HACBED].

The Rain Follows the Forest – A Plan to Replenish Hawaii’s Source of Water

The Department of Land and Natural Resources released a plan to ensure mauka watersheds are fully functioning so fresh water resources can be utilized and enjoyed by the people of Hawaii in perpetuity.

Click picture to read the plan

FACT SHEET:

  • The Rain Follows the Forest seeks to ensure mauka watersheds are fully functioning so fresh water resources can be utilized and enjoyed by the people of Hawai`i in perpetuity. This plan implements the central goals of the Abercrombie administration’s A New Day in Hawaii plan to steward the natural resources that our survival, economy, and quality of life depend on.
  • The Rain Follows the Forest provides policy solutions to manage invasive species, increase Hawaii’s ability to withstand impacts from climate change, and restore capabilities of the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) by finding additional sources of funding.
  • Hawaii’s water supplies are under threat from hotter and drier conditions from climate change, as well as loss of watershed forests.
  • Over half of Hawaii’s forests have been lost. Invasive alien (non-native) species trample and devour vegetation, leaving bare ground or openings for alien plants that consume more water and increase runoff. Controlling these and other threats while also re-planting forests requires a large-scale effort.
  • Protecting mauka forest areas is the most cost effective and efficient way to absorb rainwater and replenish groundwater. The Hawaiian islands’ sustainability and continued over-all well being of its residents and future generations depends on the continued health of the upland forests.
  • In addition to protecting our water supply, the protection of forests is essential to prevent erosion that muddies beaches, coral reefs, and fisheries, reduce Hawaii’s greenhouse gas emissions, and protect the native plants and animals unique to our islands.
  • Currently only 10% of the priority watershed areas are protected, a level of management that has taken 40 years to achieve. DLNR’s goal is double the level of protection in the next ten years, which will require approximately $11 million a year. If funded, this initiative will create over 150 local jobs.
  • In an October 2011 statewide telephone poll of 700 residents, 78% of respondents were supportive of increased funding for watershed protection from $1 million to $11 million per year. A majority supported increased general funding (mean support was 7.4 out of 10), the use of environment-related taxes (7.4 out of 10), or a visitor-related tax (8.0 out of 10). Further, 59% of respondents indicated the urgent need to increase the protection of the sources (upland forests) of our fresh water supply, and rated the urgency to protect these sources at 8.4 out of 10, with 10 representing “Extremely Urgent.”
  • The Rain Follows the Forest identifies priority watersheds and outlines on-the-ground actions and projects required to protect and sustain Hawaii’s critical water sources. To be successful, these actions must occur on a large scale across ownership boundaries, through agreements and leveraged funds provided by the statewide watershed partnerships.

STATISTICS:

  • A century-long trendi of declining rainfall has accelerated, with a 12% decline in the last 20 years alone.
  • Groundwater head levels in Pearl Harbor, which supplies over 60% of Oahu’s municipal water, declined by half since 1910.
  • Hawaii’s native forests absorb moisture from rainfall and passing clouds that condense on the thick vegetation. Intercepting cloud drip increases water capture by as much as 30% of rainfall, and increases groundwater re-supply by 10-15%.vi On Lāna`i, fog water supplies even more water than direct rainfall.  There, loss of the forest’s fog capture would reduce by half the island’s only water supply.
  • Water users already pay for the loss of native forests – and those costs are high. Invasive and widespread strawberry guava evapotranspires 27%-53%ix more water than native forests, causing extensive water loss across landscapes. For example, in East Hawai`i invasive plants have already reduced estimated groundwater recharge by 85 million gallons a day.
  • Even a small percentage reduction in groundwater recharge can be costly. One study indicates that a 1% loss of recharge in the Ko`olau Mountains could cost O`ahu $42 million net present value. Another study indicates that a 10% loss of recharge in the Ko`olau Mountains could cost $1.7 million per year – over $173 million net present value.  The gradual invasion of alien plants into native forests may have already reduced the estimated groundwater recharge by up to 10% in certain aquifers.
  • A University of Hawai`i study examined the various services provided by Oahu’s Ko‘olau forests—including water recharge, water quality, climate control, biodiversity, and cultural, aesthetic, recreational, and commercial values. These services were calculated to have a net present value of between $7.4 and $14 billion.

KULEANA – CARING FOR THE LAND:

  • The importance of forests for water has long been recognized – expressed in the ancient Hawaiian proverb “Hahai no ka ua i ka ululā`au” (the rain follows the forest). Protecting these forests has been codified into Hawaii’s customs and laws. In 1876, King David Kalākaua signed an Act for the Protection and Preservation of Woods and Forests. The Act included the construction of fences and barriers to prevent hooved animal trespass into forests important for water resources. In 1893, Queen Lili‘uokalani established the Bureau of Agriculture and Forestry for the “preservation of forests,” among other purposes. Following this, Article XI of the Constitution of the State of Hawaii includes the protection of all natural resources, held in the public trust.
  • This plan perpetuates ancient traditions of protecting and respecting the sacred wao akua -misty upland forests. The plants and wildlife within them are individually revered in Hawaiian traditions as manifestations of gods, or used for medicines, offerings, or other material needs.
  • Actions in this plan enhance these cultural practices by protecting these native natural and cultural resources from damage and extinction. Caring for these resources has been a way of life in Hawaiian traditions. Access to priority protected areas for traditional Hawaiian cultural practices is not restricted by this plan. In DOFAW areas, step-overs and gates will allow continued public access into fenced areas.
  • Although ungulate hunting is a contemporary recreational activity and a source of food for some, hunting (pig hunting in particular) is not a traditional Hawaiian practice. Reviews of firsthand testimonies in more than 60,000 native Hawaiian land documents dating from 1846 to 1910 revealed many references to pigs, but nearly every reference was in the context of them being near-home and being cared for (raised), not hunted.
  • On Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) lands, public hunting will be a priority action in the first stage of ungulate removal in fenced areas wherever safe, feasible, and effective, and DOFAW will encourage and facilitate hunting access in other areas.
  • Fencing core areas within the priority I and II watersheds will be incremental, and will gradually reduce public ungulate hunting areas over this century. Once all of the priority watersheds are fenced, public ungulate hunting areas will be reduced by approximately 30%.  Approximately four percent of DOFAW lands are currently fenced.
  • This plan seeks to increase public access to enjoy and learn about the forests that help to sustain Hawaii. This will help to build an informed citizenry of life-long learners who value Hawaii’s uniqueness and live sustainably. Maintaining and creating access and trails will teach communities about the benefits of forests during volunteer trips and hikes.
  • As part of the local jobs that this initiative seeks to fund, DLNR will support continued and expanded programs that provide local youth jobs and career opportunities during in-the-field internships. This will instill current and future generations with a sense of kuleana to respect and give back to the life-giving forests.

North Hawai‘i Community Hospital Awarded $680,000 to Implement a Health Information Exchange System

Hawaii Island Beacon Community has awarded a $680,000 contract to North Hawaii Community Hospital to implement a Health Information Exchange (HIE) system that will impact more than 32,000 patients. The HIE is the first to launch in our state and marks the first step toward an island-wide HIE on the Big Island.

The North Hawaii HIE will make a difference where it is needed most. It will help providers better serve their patients and coordinate care, especially for those with chronic diseases such as diabetes, which is more prevalent in Hawaii County than in any other county in our state.

In 2011, Hawaii County had twice as many hospitalizations for diabetes as the City & County of Honolulu.

The North Hawaii region has a higher population of Native Hawaiians, who are particularly at-risk for chronic diseases. In parts of North Hawaii, Native Hawaiians make up more than 30% of the population higher than the county rate of 28.9% and the state rate of 19.8%.

Media Release:

Hawai‘i Island Beacon Community (HIBC) has awarded a $680,000 contract to North Hawai‘i Community Hospital (NHCH) to implement a Health Information Exchange (HIE) system throughout the North Hawai‘i region, impacting more than 32,000 patients and marking the first step toward an island-wide HIE. Implementation has begun and will continue through 2012.

NHCH’s existing vendor partner Wellogic® has already laid the technical foundation for the HIE, connecting information systems from NHCH; affiliated physician groups; two statewide labs; all pharmacies, radiology and imaging centers in the region; a national database of dispensed prescriptions; and a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC).

“We are pleased to support the groundbreaking initiatives of NHCH to help providers in the North Hawai‘i region adopt and benefit from the latest technology in health care,” said Susan B. Hunt, M.H.A., project director and CEO of HIBC. “NHCH has pioneered the use of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by North Hawai‘i providers and helped to achieve a nearly 95 percent adoption rate—one of the highest for any community nationwide. The region is more than ready to take the next step, and both patients and providers will benefit from the streamlined operations that a secure HIE system makes possible.”

“It’s an exciting breakthrough for health care in North Hawai‘i,” said William Park, M.D., chief medical  officer and general surgeon at NHCH, who has championed the region’s HIE since the project’s inception. “Our partnership with Wellogic® has been very successful, and we have built up to a smooth launch. Through access to comprehensive, up-to-date patient information for providers and, eventually, patients themselves, care will be more efficient, more easily coordinated and more holistic.”

Wellogic staff will be conducting training for all North Hawai‘i providers. In addition, HIBC staff, in partnership with staff from the Hawai‘i Pacific Regional Extension Center (REC), will continue ongoing support related to the adoption and use of EHR.

In addition to supporting and assisting with EHR and HIE implementation, HIBC is working to effect clinical transformation, particularly in terms of greater coordination of and access to care for patients who are most at-risk for chronic diseases, and conducting outreach by awarding $300,000 to the community in the form of Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Grants.

Alfred Souza, Jr., Dr. Benjamin Young, and Dr. Kekuni Blaisdell Have Been Selected for the Prestigious ‘Ö ‘Ö Award

The Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce will honor this year’s 2011 ‘Ö‘Ö Award recipients Thursday, April 7, 2011 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, Coral Ballroom.

Media Release:

Alfred Souza, Jr., Dr. Benjamin Young, and Dr. Kekuni Blaisdell have been selected to receive the prestigious ‘Ö ‘Ö Award; presented to Native Hawaiians who have contributed to the betterment of Hawaiians, their communities and their professions.  The benefit dinner will begin with No-host cocktails and silent auction at 5:30p.m., dinner at 7p.m. and award ceremony at 8p.m.  Proceeds from the event go to support scholarships and programs for Native Hawaiians.

Alfred Souza, Jr., – With a BS in History and Political Science from the University of San Francisco and a graduate of the Naval Officers Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island, Alfred Souza, Jr. is a successful entrepreneur.  Souza is a partner in Hawaii Box and Packaging Company and has been VP and Partner of Tri-Star Restaurant Corp., with restaurants including Sarento’s at the top of the Ilikai and Nick’s Fish Market.  As a 10 time Wai`alae Country Club Champion, Souza was inducted into the Hawaii State Golf Hall of Fame in 1996, and now serve as a director on the Executive Committee for the Sony Open.

Dr. Benjamin Young – A minister, physician and psychiatrist, Young, a graduate of Roosevelt High School, was the first Native Hawaiian to graduate with a medical degree from Howard University Medical School.  In 1971, Young helped form the Polynesian Voyage Society and served as the onboard physician for Hokule‘a’s maiden voyage.  He established the Imi Ho‘ola program, helping Native Pacific Islanders learn pre-med science courses to gain admission to medical school, while serving as chief of staff at Castle Medical Center.  Known as the premier historian of Hawaiian Medicine, Young was honored as a Distinguished Historian by the Hawaiian Historical Society for a lifetime of significant contributions to the preservation and perpetuation of Hawaii’s history.

Dr. Richard Kekuni Blaisdell – A graduate of Kamehameha Schools, Blaisdell received his medical degree from the University Of Chicago School Of Medicine in 1948.  Trained in medicine, hematology, and pathology, Blaisdell became the first Chair of the Department of Medicine for the John A. Burns School of Medicine.  As a founder of E Ola Ma u, an organization of kanaka maoli healers, he helped provide key reports on the health of Native Hawaiians which led to the 1988 Native Hawaiian Healthcare Improvement Act.  With the belief that the essence of wellness is lokahi and pono with self, others and all in the cosmos, Blaisdell continues to study the social determinants that affect Hawaiian health.

Established 35 years ago in 1976, the ‘Ō‘Ō awards have become one of the most prestigious honors presented to outstanding Native Hawaiians who, through their talents, have made significant contributions to improve our communities and the status of Native Hawaiians.

To date, there have over 55 recipients of this important award including such notable

Native Hawaiian men and women as Kane S. Fernandez, Kenneth F. Brown, John D. Bellinger, Oswald Stender, Gladys A. Brandt, Haunani Apoliona, Monsignor Charles Kekumano, Wright Bowman, Sr., Aunty Mary Lou Kekuewa and Paulette Kahalepuna, Andy Poepoe, Herb Kawainui Kane, Dr. Michael J. Chun, David M. Peters and more.

The annual event is the Chamber’s primary fundraiser and proceeds go to support the organization’s college scholarship, business mentoring and student internship programs.  The evening will include a special Hawaiian-themed dinner and a silent auction featuring unique items from Native Hawaiian craftsmen, artists and businesses.

This year’s theme, “I ulu a māhuahua ka `umeke `ai a Hina” honors Hina and describes that the bounty of her calabash shall be fruitful and plentiful, as the NHCC sees the prosperity of the Hawaiian community.  “This year’s theme represents the mission of NHCC as we move forward to strengthen Native Hawaiian Businesses and Business Professionals, building a foundation through relationships, resources, and Hawaiian values,” stated NHCC President Dirk Soma.

Local artist Carl Pao will interpret this theme in a series of spectacular banners he will create especially for this event to decorate the ballroom.

Award-winning kumu hula Veto Baker and Micheal Casupang and their hālau, Hula Hālau I Ka Wēkiu, will perform a specially choreographed oli for the event.

Table levels are as follows and include seating for ten people:  Kou Tables priced at $5,000.00, `Ōhi’a Tables priced at $3,500.00, Koa Tables priced at $1,750.00 and Kamani Tables priced at $1,250.00.  Individual tickets may be purchased at a price of $125.00

Early reservations are encouraged for the best seating and can be made by calling Bruss Keppeler at 808. brussk@jtsii.net.  You may also call Leilani Kūpahu-Marino, ‘Ō‘Ō Awards chairperson, at 808. 352.0013 or email alohaleilani7@yahoo.com.

For information about NHCC and the ‘Ō‘Ō Awards, please visit our website at www.nativehawaiianchamberofcommerce.com.

Founded in 1974, the Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce strives to encourage and promote the interests of Native Hawaiians engaged in business and the professions.  NHCC members participate in a variety of areas, including economic, social and public affairs.

NHCC’s mission is “to strengthen Native Hawaiian businesses and professions by building on the foundation of relationships, resources and Hawaiian values:  Aloha, `Imi `ike, Lōkahi, Pono, `Ha`a ha`a, `A`a, Ala ka`ina, Po‘okela, Ho`okō and, Ha`aheo.”

Kamehameha Schools on Values-Based Land Ownership

A gift of land was the seed that blossomed into Kamehameha Schools. That gift continues to fund the education of thousands of Hawaiian learners each year. To maintain this resource into perpetuity, Kamehameha relies on five values to guide land decisions.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj-P5DADVuA]

Kamehameha Speech Festival… Congrat’s Hayden and Kacelyn

My son and his partner were selected to represent his class in the Kamehameha Schools 2011 Speech Festival.

Hayden and Kacelyn with their teacher Mrs. Moore

I’m so proud of him… I don’t even think I could read in first grade less yet memorize all this:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DDgklWn1E8]

You guys did great and we are so proud of you!

Kamehameha Schools Serves More Than 45,000 Learners and Families

Media Release:

Kamehameha Schools served more than 45,000 keiki and their caregivers through its preschools, campuses, community education programs and collaborations with other organizations during this past fiscal year which ended on June 30, 2010.

The Schools’ support of Department of Education (DOE) schools and programs has been a key focus throughout its Education Strategic Plan implemented in 2005. Its support of DOE programs and services totaled $31 million this year, compared to $27.9 million last year – an increase of 10 percent.

“Most people think of our campuses when they see the name Kamehameha Schools, and we have very talented students in all three of our campus programs. But what many don’t realize is that we support talented young students in community programs and public schools throughout Hawaiÿi,” said Kamehameha Schools CEO Dee Jay Mailer.

Education and education support spending was also up from $258 million during FY 2009 to $299 million during FY 2010. Of this amount, $102 million was spent on community-focused programs.

“Our outreach numbers last year were well past the target for 2009-10 that we established in 2005, when the Education Strategic Plan was approved,” said Chris Pating, vice president of Strategic Planning & Implementation.

“Still, we know there are 75,000 school aged Native Hawaiian keiki in our public schools, so we are deepening our efforts to support initiatives and programs already in communities with large numbers of Native Hawaiians. For example, Kamehameha Schools worked closely with the DOE in preparation of the Race to the Top application. A large part of the $75 million awarded to Hawaiÿi will flow to public schools from Nānākuli to Mākaha, one of the Zones of School Innovation defined in the state’s application,” he said. According to Pating, this also means that additional support for initiatives that Kamehameha Schools has already invested in, such as New Tech High, which is already engaging students at Nänäkuli and Waiÿanae high schools in project-based, 21st century learning will enable these programs to become sustainable, meaningful parts of the educational success stories we’re already beginning to see.

“For example Kamehameha Schools worked closely with the DOE in preparation of the Race to the Top application. A large part of the $75 million awarded to Hawai`i will flow to public schools from Nānākuli to Mākaha, one of the Zones of School Innovation defined in the state’s application. This also means that additional support for initiatives that Kamehameha Schools has already invested in, such as New Tech High, which is already engaging students at Nānākuli and Wai`anae high schools in project-based, 21st-century learning will enable these programs to become sustainable, meaningful parts of the educational success stories we’re already beginning to see.”

Other examples of KS’ educational impact include:

Literacy Instruction & Support (LIS): LIS provides culturally relevant learning experiences which develop literacy skills of Hawaiian keiki. This past fiscal year, eight new sites were added, thereby doubling the number of students served. Students at our 21 school-based sites (220 K-3 classrooms) are meeting or exceeding all key literacy targets and schools report high levels of satisfaction among DOE principals and superintendents. Attendance rates are high and students are engaged in both in-school and After School programs.

Hawaiian-focused start-up and conversion public charter schools: Kamehameha Schools has provided $9.1 million in per-pupil funding for the 17 Hawaiian-focused start-up and conversion public charter schools serving more than 3,600 students and their families.

Educator training: $7.9 million (up from $6.4 million FY 2009) in educator training and support including funding for Teach for America participants serving predominantly Hawaiian public schools.

Other Education Strategic Plan milestones in FY 2010 include:

  • Over $12 million in scholarships to Native Hawaiian children attending eligible preschools and private-school kindergarten programs across the state. (2,194 keiki)
  • $12.6 million for Native Hawaiians attending college and post-high vocational/technical institutions. (2,508 awards)
  • $6.6 million in funding support for a variety of programs for students in DOE schools, including:
    • Tutoring and test preparation for students ages 16+ who wish to attain their competency-based high-school diploma.
    • Summer enrichment programs on campus.
    • Homework centers and after-school tutoring.
    • Place-based learning in loÿi kalo and Hawaiian fishponds.
    • Distance learning.
    • Classroom-based Hawaiian social studies instruction for grades 4-7.
    • After-school violence and substance abuse prevention for at-risk youth.

“Going forward, Kamehameha Schools is committed to supporting the work in the DOE as well as programs and services in the community. Our goal is to see our Native Hawaiian keiki thrive – whether they are on one of our campuses, attending a charter school on Kaua`i or in an after-school program through our Literacy Instruction and Support program on Hawai`i, Kamehameha Schools recognizes its kuleana to support educational success for Native Hawaiians in perpetuity,” said Pating.

Kamehameha Schools is a private, educational, charitable trust founded and endowed by the legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Kamehameha Schools operates a statewide educational system enrolling nearly 6,900 students of Hawaiian ancestry at K-12 campuses on O`ahu, Maui and Hawai`i and 31 preschool sites statewide. Approximately 37,500 additional Hawaiian learners and caregivers are served each year through a range of other Kamehameha Schools’ outreach programs, community collaborations and financial aid opportunities in Hawai`i and across the continental United States.

Prime Minister Henry Noa of the Lawful Hawaiian Government Announcing a Nationwide Free Election

From the Kingdom of Hawaii YouTube Site:

Prime Minister Henry Noa announces the upcoming election for the Kingdom of Hawaii on November 5th, 2011. Interview by David Lakota at the Mana Kau Kana Wai, the 35th Legislative Session of the Lawful Hawaiian Government in Oahu.

Prime Minister Henry Noa, Nobles, Representatives, and other members of the Kingdom, convened to conduct government business, and to conclude that upcoming election is among the most simple and poweful of means to unify the previously divided people of the Hawaiian Nation.

There are positions, filled and unfilled, for 24 Nobles and 24 Representatives, in the Kingdom of Hawaii, the Lawful Hawaiian Government. Several more of these seats were filled at the annual legislative session.

Leaders of the Hawaiian Nation are calling out to the Kanaka Maoli of Hawaii, and those who are living and traveling abroad, to “Come home.” Fill the remaining seats of the Lawful Hawaiian Government so that this sovereign Nation of Hawaii may be complete.

The nationwide free election for the independent people of Hawaii, both Kanaka Maoli and non-Kanaka Maoli is the single most powerful way yet undertaken for the unification of these Hawaiian Islands.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvg0fOpg5mM]

Hawaii Man Can’t Live on State Park as Caretaker

Media Release:

A native Hawaiian did not have the right to set up a home in a state park, a Hawaii Appeals Court ruled.

Lloyd Pratt, who was convicted of camping in a closed area of a Kalalau state park, argued his Hawaiian ancestry entitled him to live off and maintain his native soil.

Pratt had tried to settle a portion of land and plant crops in the wilderness area of the park on the island of Kauai. He said he had the right to act as a “hoa’aina,” or caretaker of the land and restorer of ancient, native Hawaiian sites.

Pratt claimed his “ancestors” are buried in the Kalalau Valley, that his father’s family is from Oahu, and that his other relatives hailed from the Big Island of Hawaii.

The Intermediate Court of Appeals upheld Pratt’s conviction.
“Pratt has not established that he is a lawful occupant or tenant of … Kalalau,” Judge Katherine Leonard wrote for the court. “The district court made no factual findings that Pratt or any of his family members lawfully resided, owned, or occupied land in the Kalalau Valley.”

Leonard added that Pratt appears to be a “deeply spiritual Hawaiian man,” but that  state laws “do not go so far as to allow native Hawaiians to reside on state lands, without permission, in order to bring ancient ways and ancient sites back to life.”

Judge Craig Nakamura dissented in part, writing that while Pratt’s conduct is not exempt from prosecution, the trial court incorrectly weighed the state’s interest against the fact that Pratt was not causing actual harm.
Judge Alexa Fujise issued a concurring opinion.