Civil Defense Weather and Surf Information Update

This is a Civil Defense message. This is a weather and surf information update for Friday October 13 at 3 PM.

The National Weather Service reports unstable weather conditions to continue through today and into tonight for Hawaii Island.

KITV Radar image at 3:30 Hawaii Time.

Police report all roads are open at this time, but advise that driving conditions are poor because of occasional heavy downpours.

If lightning threatens your area, the safest place to be is indoors.

Should power outages occur, be on the alert for non-operable traffic signals. Please treat flashing traffic lights as a four-way stop.

In addition, the National Weather Service expects high surf to approach advisory levels along the shores of North Kohala, Hamakua, North and South Hilo and Puna from tonight through the weekend.

Oceanfront residents and beachgoers along the affected shores are advised to be on the alert for possible high and dangerous surf as well as exercise caution due to the unpredictability of huge swells.

As a precaution, boat owners and oceanfront residents should take action to secure their property.

Flood Advisory Issued for Parts of the Big Island

This is a flood advisory information update for Friday October 13 at 9 AM.
The National Weather Service has issued a flood advisory for Hawaii Island, including the areas of Waikoloa, Puako, Kawaihae, Kohala, Waimea, and Waipi’o Valley.

Police report all roads are open at this time, but advise that driving conditions are poor because of occasionally heavy downpours.

Remember, if lightning does threaten your area, the safest place to be is indoors.

Should power outages occur, be on the alert for non-operable traffic signals. Please treat flashing traffic lights as a four-way stop.

Again, the National Weather Service reports unstable weather conditions for all of Hawaii Island to continue through today and into tonight.

National Weather Service Has Issued a High Surf Warning

This is a Civil Defense message.

This is a High Surf Warning information update for Friday, January 13th at 11:30 AM.

The National Weather Service has issued a High Surf Warning for the shores of Kohala, Kona and Ka‘ū to go into effect from mid-day today and will remain in effect through tomorrow morning.

A High Surf Warning means there is a significant threat to life and property from the surf.

Surf over 12 feet is predicted along these shores with highest surf heights to coincide with the high tides early this evening and again around sunrise tomorrow.

Oceanfront residents, all ocean activities and beachgoers along the affected shores are advised to be on the alert for possible high and dangerous surf.

You are advised to exercise caution due to the unpredictability of huge swells and dangerous surf.

As a precaution, boat owners and oceanfront residents should take actions to secure their property.

Thank you. This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense.

National Weather Service Honolulu Making Changes to High Wind Warning and Wind Advisory Criteria

Effective August, 1st 2013, the National Weather Service office in Honolulu will begin issuing High Wind Warning and Wind Advisory products based on updated thresholds.

NOAA Wind ChangesThese thresholds were changed based upon customer feedback and to bring criteria better in line with national standards.

The updated criteria are as follows:

Wind Advisory:

1. Sustained winds of 30-39 mph for an hour or more, and/or gusts of 50 to 57 mph.

2. Summits of Haleakala, Mauna Loa, and Mauna Kea: Sustained winds of 45-55 mph for an hour or more, and/or gusts of 55-65 mph.

High Wind Warning:

1. Sustained winds of 40 mph or greater for an hour or more, and/or gusts of 58 mph or higher.

2. Summits of Haleakala, Mauna Loa, and Mauna Kea: Sustained winds of 56 mph or greater for an hour or more, and/or gusts of 66 mph or higher.

Wind Advisory products are designed to alert the public to strong and gusty winds that may cause hazardous driving, minor structural damage, and power outages.

High Wind Warning products alert the public to the potential for strong and damaging winds. Winds that reach the warning threshold are capable of doing significant damage to structures, widespread damage to vegetation, and represent a serious hazard.

For questions regarding the updated criteria please contact National Weather Service Honolulu’s Warning Coordination Meteorologist, Mike Cantin, at 808-973-5270.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Message – Bus Service to Resume Operations at 7:30 Tonight

Tropical Storm Flossie has been downgraded to a Tropical Depression and is presently located approximately 145 miles Northwest of Hilo.

Civildefense

 

Although storm conditions have subsided and continue to improve presently, the Kailua Kona area continues to experience strong winds and moderate rain conditions are being reported.

With the improvement in conditions the Mass Transit Bus Service will resume operations effective 7:30 PM tonight with the Hilo to South Kohala Resort route, and return to a normal full schedule beginning tomorrow morning.

In addition, all County parks and beach parks will be opened and scheduled solid waste transfer stations and the Hilo and Puuanahulu Landfills will be reopened starting tomorrow morning. Although the impact of Tropical Storm Flossie may have been relatively moderate, the potential for serious and possibly life threatening storm conditions was present.

The Hawaii County Civil Defense would like to thank the community for your patience and cooperation and for doing your part to prepare for possible impact.

 

 

Hawaii County Civil Defense Message for Monday July 29th

This is a Civil Defense Message

Civildefense

This is a Tropical Storm Warning Information Update for Monday July 29th at 7:00 AM.

The National Weather Service is maintaining the Tropical Storm Warning and Flood Watch for Hawaii Island.

Tropical Storm Flossie is presently located approximately 120 miles East Northeast of Hilo and moving West Northwest at 16 MPH.  The system continues to present with sustained winds of 45 MPH with higher gusts, heavy rains and, potential high surf and storm surge conditions.

At the present time, the affects of the storm are expected to impact Hawaii Island around 8:00 AM this morning and continue through the day.  The system will be monitored and the public kept informed of any changes or updates.  The public is reminded that the Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect and to please continue to prepare for possible storm conditions.

The suspension of all mass transit bus services continues to remain in effect however the weather conditions will be evaluated and bus service restored as soon as safely possible. We apologize for this inconvenience and thank everyone for their patience and understanding.  Please continue to monitor your local news and weather forecasts and additional messages will be broadcasted as information is made available.

Again, the National Weather Service is maintaining the Tropical Storm Warning and Flood Watch for Hawaii Island.

Tropical Storm Flossie is presently located approximately 120 miles East Northeast of Hilo and moving West Northwest at 16 MPH.  The system continues to present with sustained winds of 45 MPH with higher gusts, heavy rains and, potential high surf and storm surge conditions.

At the present time, the affects of the storm are expected to impact Hawaii Island around 8:00 AM this morning and continue through the day.  The system will be monitored and the public kept informed of any changes or updates.  The public is reminded that the Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect and to please continue to prepare for possible storm conditions.

The suspension of all mass transit bus services continues to remain in effect however the weather conditions will be evaluated and bus service restored as soon as safely possible. We apologize for this inconvenience and thank everyone for their patience and understanding.

Please continue to monitor your local news and weather forecasts and additional messages will be broadcasted as information is made available.

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park – Minimal Services Until Flossie Passes

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will remain open during Tropical Storm Flossie, but with minimal services.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

“We encourage people to shelter in place, and stay off roads. Our first priority is safety, and keeping our park employees and visitors out of harm’s way,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando.

Park officials have closed the following areas as of Sunday evening. Closures remain in effect until the storm has passed and conditions are safe:

  • Chain of Craters Road, from Devastation Trail parking lot to the coast
  • All backcountry areas, including Mauna Loa and cabins
  • Mauna Loa Road (known locally as “Mauna Loa Strip Road”)
  • All coastal areas, including, ‘Āpua Point, Keauhou, Halapē, and Ka‘aha
  • Kulanaokuaiki campsite
  • Nāpau campsite
  • Nāmakanipaio Campgrounds and A-frame cabins
  • Jaggar Museum (observation deck open but no rangers on duty)
  • Additional closures may be warranted as Flossie nears

Kīlauea Visitor Center will open Monday from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. with reduced staffing. Thurston Lava Tube will remain open. Volcano House and Kīlauea Military Camp are open.
The National Weather Service issued a Tropical Storm Warning for the islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i, Kaho‘olawe, Lāna‘i, and O‘ahu. Forecasters predict extremely heavy rains. As of 5 p.m. HST Sunday, Tropical Storm Flossie was approximately 320 miles east of Hilo, with sustained winds of 60 mph, and higher gusts expected. The storm is moving west at 18 mph.

For updates on Tropical Storm Flossie, go to http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/cphc/

For Civil Defense updates for the County of Hawai‘i, and the location of local shelters, go to http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/.

 

STATE OF EMERGENCY For County of Hawaii – Residents Urged to Be Prepare for #Flossie

Emergency Proclamation

Click to view

Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi released the following EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION today for the County of Hawaii:

EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION:

WHEREAS, Chapter 127, Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, as amended, and Chapter 128, Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, as amended, provide for the establishment of County organizations for disaster relief with a deputy director in charge of each political subdivision; and

WHEREAS, the Mayor of the County of Hawai‘i has been appointed as the Deputy Director of Civil Defense of the County of Hawai‘i; and

WHEREAS, Chapter 7, Articles 1 and 2 of the Hawai‘i County Code, establishes a Civil Defense Agency within the County of Hawai‘i and prescribes its powers, duties, and responsibilities, and Section 13 23 of the Hawai‘i County Charter empowers the Mayor of the County to declare emergencies; and

WHEREAS, the National Weather Service at 5:00 P.M. on July 27, 2013 issued a Watch for Tropical Storm Flossie Advisory Number 13 advising that Tropical Storm Flossie had entered Hawaiian waters and was located at 770 miles east of Hilo, Hawai‘i as a Tropical Storm with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph and higher gusts; and

WHEREAS, the National Weather Service at 11:00 P.M. on July 27, 2013 issued Tropical Storm Advisory Number 14 upgrading its Advisory to a Warning for Hawaii and Maui County and continuing this Warning in Tropical Storm Advisory 16 on July 28, 2013 with maximum sustained wind of 60 mph and higher gusts; and

WHEREAS, a Tropical Storm Warning means that possible tropical storm conditions can occur any time within the next 36 hours; and

WHEREAS, conditions associated with tropical storms include but are not limited to storm surge, high surf, wind and rain may occur; and;

WHEREAS, due to the possibility of property damage and/or bodily injury to residents of Hawai`i Island, and the need for government agencies and representatives from the private sector to mobilize and provide immediate services to our island residents, a Civil Defense state of emergency is authorized pursuant to Chapters 127 and 128, Hawai`i Revised Statutes, as amended, and Chapter 7, Hawai`i County Code.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM P. KENOI, Mayor of the County of Hawai‘i, do hereby proclaim and declare that a state of emergency exists on the Hawai‘i Island, effective 1:00 P.M., July 28, 2013, and continuing thereon until further act by this office.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the County of Hawai‘i to be affixed. Done this 28th day of July 28, 2013 in Hilo, Hawai‘i.

WIILIAM P. KENOI
Mayor
County of Hawai‘i

 

National Weather Service Places Oahu Under a Tropical Storm Warning – Statewide List of Evacuation Shelters

National Weather Service places Oahu under a Tropical Storm Warning

The National Weather Service has placed Oahu under a Tropical Storm Warning. A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when the threat of tropical storm conditions of high wind and storm surge are expected within 36 hours. Actions for protection of life and property should begin immediately. Evacuations may be ordered depending on the severity of Tropical Storm Flossie.

Click to see the statewide list of shelters

Click to see the statewide list of shelters

All residents are advised to take the following preparedness actions:

Fill up the fuel tank in your vehicle(s).

Have some spare cash on hand. The amount you would normally spend in one week is a good choice.

Be aware of the hazards that hurricanes and tropical storms create – destructive storm surge, severe flooding and high winds.

Know the location of your nearest hurricane shelter but do not automatically go there. Locations and opening times will be broadcast over TV and radio. See this link for Hawaii Hurricane Evacuation Shelters http://www.scd.hawaii.gov/documents/2013HurEvachelters.pdf

Know if you are located in a tsunami evacuation zone. Evacuation zones for hurricanes and tropical storms are the same as those for tsunami events. Evacuation zones are printed in the yellow tabbed section of your telephone white pages. Or see this link for an interactive evacuation zone map http://tsunami.csc.noaa.gov/

Consider designating an off-island friend as a family emergency contact should you be separated following a hurricane or other disaster. When phone systems are restored family members would check in with this person.

Plan to care for your family pets in the event you have to evacuate your home. Do not leave pets at home. If your home is not safe for you it is not safe for your pets.

Find out if your insurance policy covers flood damage.

Stock a seven-day supply of non-perishable foods and emergency supplies.

Make sure you have a battery operated radio, flashlight and spare batteries on hand at all times.

Flash Flood Watch Issued For All Hawaiian Islands – Bring On Flossie!

Civildefense

FLASH FLOOD WATCH FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT…

.HEAVY RAIN ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FLOSSIE WILL BRING THE THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING ACROSS THE MAIN HAWAIIAN ISLANDS STARTING WEDNESDAY MORNING AND THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT.

..FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT…

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN HONOLULU HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR ALL HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

* FROM MONDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE TUESDAY NIGHT.

* HEAVY RAIN ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL CYCLONE FLOSSIE WILL BRING THE THREAT OF WIDESPREAD HEAVY RAIN THAT COULD RESULT IN FLASH FLOODING.

* THE RAIN WILL BE WIDESPREAD…WILL AFFECT BOTH THE UPPER AND LOWER ELEVATIONS. THE HEAVY RAIN WILL ALSO FALL OVER URBAN AREAS IN THE LOWER ELEVATIONS…WHICH WILL BE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO FLOODING PROBLEMS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS VERY DANGEROUS. REMEMBER THAT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE RAINING HEAVILY WHERE YOU ARE FOR FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR.

MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION IF FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ARE ISSUED.

Instructions:

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS VERY DANGEROUS. REMEMBER THAT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE RAINING HEAVILY WHERE YOU ARE FOR FLASH FLOODING TO OCCUR. MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION IF FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS ARE ISSUED.

 

Insurance Division Reminds Public About Hurricane Coverage

The Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs’ Insurance Division reminds the public that with the onset of hurricane season, which began June 1, now is a good time to review your insurance policies to ensure your home, condominium and business is covered in the case of a hurricane-related loss.

Basic home insurance does not cover hurricane damage. Homeowners typically must purchase hurricane insurance separately. Also, not all wind damage is covered by hurricane insurance. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center of the National Weather Service must declare a wind-related event to be a hurricane for this coverage to become available. Banks usually require hurricane insurance as a mortgage condition.

Insurance Rates

Click to view rates

Hurricane policies will cover water damage resulting from wind-related impairment of the home’s exterior. One example would be if hurricane debris punctures the roof and rain water flows into your living room. Other types of water damage (i.e., storm surge, cascading water or rising streams) are not covered by hurricane or homeowners insurance. Flood insurance provides coverage for these other exposures.

“The last hurricane that hit Hawaii was Hurricane Iniki in 1992, and Kauai took the brunt of the damage,” said Insurance Commissioner Gordon Ito. “Hurricane Iniki caused almost $2 billion in damages, which is about $3 billion in today’s dollars. It can take just one major storm to cause severe property damage, and we urge you to be prepared.”

Please consider reviewing your policy and discussing the following topics with your insurance producer (also known as an insurance agent):

  • Did your producer list your home as single wall, double wall, or masonry?
  • Do you have hurricane straps or clips on your home?
  • Does your insurer provide premium credits for such mitigating devices and did your producer check for this?
  • How much is my home insured for?
  • Is it covered for replacement value or actual cash value?

All of these things can dramatically affect how much you pay for hurricane insurance.

Residents are encouraged to shop around for your coverage.  The Insurance Division’s premium publication for consumers is a “quick reference guide” that assists consumers in shopping for homeowners’ and hurricane insurance. The premium publication is available at: http://hawaii.gov/dcca/home_rates/home-insurance-rate-comparison.html

Additionally, after a loss consumers and businesses may have difficulty submitting a claim for losses because of a lack of proof of assets owned. When reviewing your policies, it is also a good time to take an inventory of your possessions. Take photos of belongings such as jewelry, electronics, appliances, sports equipment and even art work and decorations. Gather any receipts and serial numbers as well.  Keep this information in a secure area so you can access them for claim purposes. Make sure these assets are covered under your policy.

To assist in the inventory process, you could download the National Association of Insurance Commissioners app myHOME Scr.APP.book for iPhone or Android for assistance in cataloging belongings.

To learn more about the app, visit: http://www.insureuonline.org/home_inventory_page.htm The Hawaii Insurance Division oversees the state’s insurance industry, issues licenses, examines the fiscal condition of Hawaii-based companies, reviews rate and policy filings, and investigates insurance-related complaints.

 

The National Weather Service Recognizes Ewa Beach as a StormReady/TsunamiReady Community

The National Weather Service will officially designate Ewa Beach as a community that’s prepared for storms and tsunamis.

National Weather Service

The west Oahu community will be recognized as StormReady and TsunamiReady during a ceremony today at the Pride for Ewa event. The weather service’s Honolulu office says a grassroots group spearheaded a campaign to prepare Ewa Beach to respond to these natural hazards.

Communities become StormReady with steps like developing hazardous weather operations plans and holding annual weather safety talks. They become TsunamiReady by promoting public readiness through community education and the distribution of information and developing a tsunami plan which includes holding emergency exercises. Ewa now joins Kailua and Hau’ula with this readiness designation.

Members of the Ewa Beach Emergency Preparedness Committee made up of volunteer Ewa residents will attend this weekend’s ceremony. Maj. Gen. Darryll Wong of the Hawaii National Guard will also be there along with State Civil Defense, Oahu Emergency Management and National Weather Service officials.

The ceremony will be held at 12:00 p.m. at the Pride for Ewa – Celebrating Ohana Together – Hoalauna Park, 91-1330 Keaunui Drive, Ewa Beach, HI 96706. The event is free and is open to the public.

 

Hawai’i County Drought Conditions Warrant Natural Disaster Designation

Federal Relief Offered to Area Farmers and Ranchers

Governor Neil Abercrombie today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated Hawai’i County as a primary natural disaster area resulting from ongoing drought conditions. The Governor last month applied for the designation, which clears the way for Hawai’i Island farmers and ranchers to apply for available federal relief.

“By designating Hawai’i County a natural disaster area, President Obama and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack have recognized that the island’s farmers and ranchers have endured enough,” said Governor Abercrombie. “Even today, Big Island residents continue to experience drought conditions ranging from severe to extreme. The USDA’s assistance will help hard working families recover losses and see it through until conditions improve.”

“A drought can be as catastrophic as a hurricane or flood to a farmer or rancher,” said Russell Kokubun, chairperson of the Hawai’i Board of Agriculture.  “This disaster assistance is a lifeline for many of our agriculture producers who have been dealing with severe drought conditions for over six years. We truly appreciate this support from the USDA.”

Hawai’i County was formally designated a natural disaster area on Jan. 18, 2012. Qualified farm operators in the designated area are eligible for low interest emergency (EM) loans from USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) to cover losses. Eligible individuals have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply. FSA considers each loan application on its own merits. Additional information is available online at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov.

According to the National Weather Service, leeward slopes of Hawai’i Island continue to receive little rain. As a result, a classification of “extreme drought” persists in the South Kohala District and Pokakula Region of the Hamakua District. Increased rainfall has resulted in recent improvement from extreme drought in other areas, but the Ka’u and North Kona Districts remain within severe drought parameters. Moderate drought remains over parts of the South Kona District. Pastures and general vegetation from Kawaihae to Pohakuloa are described as being in “very poor” condition, and brush fires continue to be a concern.

High Surf Warning for All Southern Facing Shores Friday Through Saturday

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN HONOLULU HAS ISSUED A HIGH SURF ADVISORY STARTING FRIDAY MORNING FOR RISING SURF ALONG SOUTH FACING SHORES OF ALL HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Department of Emergency Management

THE HIGH SURF ADVISORY WILL BE IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM FRIDAY TO 6 PM HST SATURDAY.

A BUILDING SOUTH SWELL WILL RAISE SURF HEIGHTS TO ADVISORY LEVELS ALONG SOUTH FACING SHORES FRIDAY MORNING. SURF HEIGHTS WILL REMAIN ELEVATED THROUGH SATURDAY.

SURF WILL INCREASE TO HEIGHTS OF 6 TO 8 FEET ALONG SOUTH FACING SHORES STARTING FRIDAY MORNING AND CONTINUING THROUGH SATURDAY.

IMPACTS:

LARGE BREAKING WAVES WILL PRODUCE DANGEROUS RIP CURRENTS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

A HIGH SURF ADVISORY MEANS THAT HIGH SURF WILL AFFECT BEACHES IN THE ADVISORY AREA PRODUCING RIP CURRENTS AND LOCALIZED BEACH EROSION.

SWIMMERS, SURFERS AND BEACH GOERS SHOULD EXERCISE CAUTION UNTIL THE HIGH SURF ADVISORY EXPIRES. IF YOU ARE IN DOUBT ABOUT SURF CONDITIONS BE SURE TO CONSULT A CITY LIFEGUARD OR OTHER WATER SAFETY PERSONNEL WHENEVER POSSIBLE.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Issues Flash Flood Watch for Big Island

Hawaii County Civil Defense Message:

This is a weather update for Thursday afternoon, November 18 at 4:15

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for Hawai’i Island effective tonight Thursday evening November 18 through Friday November 19.

A flash flood watch means that weather conditions may develop that leads to flash flooding.

Due to the flash flood watch the following are issued.

There is a possibility of heavy rain. All residents in flood prone areas are asked to be on the alert and prepare for possible flooding conditions.

All motorists are asked to drive with caution and be on the alert for debris, runoff and ponding of water. Be aware that road closures and slowdowns can occur without any warning.

Again, the National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for Hawai’i Island effective tonight through tomorrow. Heavy rains are possible for this period.