‘Ulu Smartphone App Highlights Kauai Breadfruit

In advance of the September 15, 2013 Breadfruit Festival Takes Root on Kauai, the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project has added sites of interest on Kauai to the Talking Trees app for iPhone and Android.

The Talking Trees App

The Talking Trees App

The Talking Trees app is free and features suggested stops on Kauai and Hawaii Island that offer the opportunity to learn about the culture and history of the islands through stories of the ‘ulu (breadfruit). Information is conveyed through photos, articles and video interviews with local cultural practitioners. For people who want to learn how to cook with breadfruit, the app also features award-wining breadfruit recipes. Other links include information about how to cultivate and use breadfruit and Hawaiian mythology.

“There are many different drive guides out there, but ours is the only one in Hawaii that takes people on a journey to see the islands and learn about the culture and history by seeking out the breadfruit trees,” says Andrea Dean, Co-Director of the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project, “It’s a fun way to see Kauai or Hawaii Island—kind of like a treasure hunt for ‘ulu trees.”

“Breadfruit was a primary staple food of Hawaii and still is in much of the Pacific. Raising awareness about how few trees are remaining and the importance of breadfruit to local and global food security is a part of our mission. The Talking Trees app puts people in direct contact with these beautiful trees,“ says Dr. Diane Ragone, Director of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

The Talking Trees app was developed with support from the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. A corresponding enhanced web-based map was developed with support from the Atherton Family Foundation. Ho’oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project of the Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

Learn more and download the app at breadfruit.info.

 

18th Hawaii Coffee Association (HCA) Conference and 5th Cupping Competition

The 18th Hawaii Coffee Association (HCA) Conference and 5th Cupping Competition is July 18-20 at the Kauai Beach Resort. Offering a full lineup of informative activities, the annual event attracts statewide coffee industry growers, processors, roasters, wholesalers and retailers.

2010 Cupping Winner

2010 Cupping Winner

The gathering is also open to the public and the 2013-2014 season marks the 200th anniversary of coffee cultivation in Hawaii.

The conference includes workshops covering green grading, label compliance, quality control of roasting and packaging, cupping and eradication of the coffee berry borer beetle. Also on tap are legislative updates and reports from UH’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), the Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC) and the Synergistic Hawaii Agriculture Council (SHAC).

Other activities include an expo, silent auction, election of HCA officers, tour of Kauai Coffee Company and networking reception at the National Tropical Botanical Garden. Winners of the cupping competition are announced Saturday at a dinner headlined by TV business reporter Howard Dicus.

The prestigious, annual cupping competition is an evaluation of coffee based on flavor, aroma, “mouth-feel,” acidity, sweetness and aftertaste. Last year, a panel of three lead judges, using standardized blind procedures, cupped a field of 117 Hawaiian coffees hailing from eight districts. Top honors were given to Heavenly Hawaiian Farms in Kona and the Big Isle’s Wood Valley Coffee Co. in K’au.

For more information and to register, visit www.hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/Events.

The Hawaii Coffee Association’s mission is to represent all sectors of the Hawaii coffee industry, including growers, millers, wholesalers, roasters and retailers.  The HCA’s primary objective is to increase awareness and consumption of Hawaiian coffees.  A major component of HCA’s work is the continuing education of members and consumers. The annual conference has continued to grow each year and has gained increased international attention. For information, visit www.hawaiicoffeeassociation.com.

 

 

Free Educational App – “Talking Trees”

The Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project has developed and released a free educational app for the iPhone and Android called Talking Trees.

The Talking Trees app features suggested stops on Hawai‘i Island that offer the opportunity to learn about the culture and history of the island through stories of the ‘ulu (breadfruit). Information is conveyed through photos, articles and video interviews with local cultural practitioners. For people who want to learn how to cook with ‘ulu, the app also features award-wining breadfruit recipes. Other links include information about how to cultivate and use breadfruit and Hawaiian mythology.

Ag app

“The goal for us in creating the app is to engage people in the culture, history and current uses of breadfruit,” says Craig Elevitch, Co-Director of the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project. “In addition to being a great food, there are so many fascinating Hawaiian stories about life as it relates to the ‘ulu. So much of Hawaiian mythology is relevant to life today.”

The Talking Trees app was developed with support from the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement. A corresponding enhanced Google map was developed with support from the Atherton Family Foundation. Ho’oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project of the Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

Learn more and download the app at breadfruit.info, or from the iTunes stores.

 

Workshops – “Value-Added Innovation for Hawai’i Growers: Making the Family Farm Profitable”

A workshop entitled “Value-Added Innovation for Hawai’i Growers: Making the Family Farm Profitable” will help growers hone their skills at adding value to their products and services. The free workshop will be held on March 20th in Hilo, March 21st in Kona, March 27th on Kaua’i, March 28th on O’ahu, and March 29th on Maui.

The Value-added Innovations workshop covers the process of developing a wide range of value-added products for local and export markets. Photos by Craig Elevitch

The Value-added Innovations workshop covers the process of developing a wide range of value-added products for local and export markets. Photos by Craig Elevitch

Competing with cheap imported agricultural goods, many Hawai’i farms have a difficult time selling their products profitably as raw commodities. The workshop will show how Hawai’i farm enterprises can differentiate their products to become more profitable, and therefore viable businesses.

“Small-farm enterprises are a crucial component of Hawai’i’s agriculture as we attempt to meet the diversity of our food needs,” says Dr. Robert Paull, an expert in crop quality at University of Hawai’i, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. “These enterprises need to be sustainably managed and economically viable. Value-added practices are essential for increasing potential for small farm profitability.”

Value-added practices include crop selection, cultivation techniques, harvest, and handling after harvest. All of these practices can improve quality and increase the price consumers are willing to pay. Photo by Craig Elevitch

Value-added practices include crop selection, cultivation techniques, harvest, and handling after harvest. All of these practices can improve quality and increase the price consumers are willing to pay. Photo by Craig Elevitch

The workshops will give participants insights into a range of subjects such as profitable crops and varieties, price setting for different markets and developing processed products. Participants will leave the workshop with an expanded understanding of adding value to all products and practices, while reducing risks and maximizing profits. The presentations emphasize ways to focus efforts at minimal cost for maximum effect, approaches that control risk, and resources for business planning.

“Adding value is an essential component of small farm sustainability,” says Ken Love, culinary educator and one of the workshop presenters. “There are many different ways to add value in growing, processing, and marketing products. This workshop is about finding those ways of adding value to your operation that are best suited for you and that are ultimately profitable.”

The workshop will be led by Craig Elevitch, Ken Love, and specialist presenters at each workshop location. Elevitch is an agroforestry educator whose most recent book Specialty Crops for Pacific Islands (2011), provides insights into sustainable cultivation and processing techniques for local and export markets with an emphasis on production methods, postharvest processing, and marketing. Love, widely known as a passionate advocate for the innovative small farm, is co-owner of Love Family Farms in Kona, Hawai’i, which produces a range of value-added products including jams, jellies, dried fruits, and coffee.

For more information and to register, visit www.valueadded.info or call 808-756-9437. The first 30 registrants for each workshop location will receive a free preview copy of the new publication (in press): Adding Value to Locally Grown Crops in Hawai’i: A Guide for Small Farm Enterprise Innovation. The workshop is produced with funds from the State of Hawai’i Department of Agriculture.

Workshop Schedule

  • Hilo, Hawai’i, Wed., March 20, Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC).
  • Holualoa, Kona, Hawai’i, Thurs., March 21, Kona Imin Center.
  • Kalaheo, Kaua’i, Wed., March 27, National Tropical Botanical Garden.
  • Pearl City, O’ahu, Thurs., March 28, O’ahu Urban Garden Center (University of Hawai’i).
  • Kahului, Maui, Fri., March 29, Cary & Eddie’s Hideaway Restaurant.

Hawaii’s Innovative Approach To Green Growth Takes International Stage In India

Department of Land and Natural Resources Chairman William J. Aila, Jr. highlighted Hawaii’s international leadership in green growth at the Island Summit held at the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity, Conference of the Parties (CBD COP-11) on October 16. Aila led a Hawaii delegation to Hyderabad, India, where Hawaii was featured in yesterday’s event—Island Innovations: Celebrating Bright Spots, Leadership and Successes in Island Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods. Aila took the international stage to address the high-level audience and shared Hawaii’s innovative approach and commitment to integrated green growth with the world.

Hawaii Delegation (from left to right): Hau`oli Wichman (National Tropical Botanical Garden), William Aila (DLNR), Chipper Wichman (National Tropical Botanical Garden), Minister Rolph Payet (Seychelles), Jacqueline Kozak Thiel (Hawaii Invasive Species Council), Didier Dogley (Seychelles). Photo courtesy J. Thiel

“Hawaii is the most isolated population on the planet, and we depend on imports for 80 to 90 percent of our energy and food. We must take action to build a more sustainable and self-sufficient economy for our people,” Aila stated.

The Hawaii delegation highlighted the state’s commitments to renewable energy and a sustainable economy as outlined in Governor Neil Abercrombie’s New Day Plan, DLNR’s “Rain Follows the Forest” watershed initiative, Hawaii’s Clean Energy Initiative, Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Plan, county sustainability initiatives and local grassroots community efforts.

William Aila addresses international, high-level audience at Island Innovations event at Convention on Biological Diversity, Conference of the Parties, Oct. 16, 2012 in Hyderabad, India. Photo by J. Thiel.

The Island Innovations event was organized by the Global Island Partnership (GLISPA) and co-hosted by the governments of Seychelles and India. GLISPA promotes actions for island conservation and sustainable livelihoods by inspiring leadership, catalyzing commitments and facilitating collaboration. The United States helped found GLISPA in 2006, and the state of Hawaii is now engaging in this international network of island leaders. GLISPA is co-chaired by the Presidents of Seychelles and Palau and the Prime Minister of Grenada.

Working with Hawaii leaders, GLISPA helped form the Hawaii Green Growth Initiative (HGG) in 2011.  “HGG’s mission is to bring Hawai`i leaders from energy, food and the environment together to achieve sustainability in Hawaii and serve as a model for integrated green growth,” explained Chipper Wichman, CEO of the National Tropical Botanical Gardens (NTBG) on Kauai and member of the Hawaii delegation. “Hawaii’s participation in the Island Summit is an unprecedented opportunity to represent our country’s commitment to island conservation and sustainability.”

Hawaii DLNR Chairman William Aila Jr. greets Seychelles Minister of Environment and Energy Rolph Payet. Photo courtesy J. Thiel

Hawaii was also featured at the Island Bright Spots discussions on building a green-blue economy. The Hawaii delegation spoke with representatives from all over the world about Hawaii’s collaborative and cultural-based efforts to build a green-blue economy with ambitious targets to increase renewable energy, local food production, and protection of natural resources from mountaintop to sea while creating a more diverse economy with green jobs. Aila and Wichman were joined on the delegation by Jacqueline Kozak Thiel of the Hawaii Invasive Species Council and Hauoli Wichman from NTBG.

While in Hyderabad, the Hawaii delegation met with members of the U.S. State Department, as well as delegates from the Pacific, Caribbean, and Indian Oceans, as well as nations with islands to share with and learn from other islands.

“The Hawaii Green Growth Initiative is important to all islands because we need to build sustainable economies for our environment and our communities” said Rolph Payet, Minister for Environment and Energy for the Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean. We welcome Hawaii to the global island family and look forward to learning from one another.”

“As islands, we understand that the challenges facing islands and our planet are linked, and we must solve them together. Our economic future depends on caring for our wnvironment mauka to makai,” Aila explained.

Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas – Looking for Artists

Artists are invited to submit original 2D media artwork to the Breadfruit Fine Art Contest, a part of Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas being held at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 29, 2012 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm.

The Gift of Kū by Caren Loebel-Fried, winner of the 2011 Breadfruit Fine Art Contest.

The Breadfruit Fine Art Contest is part of the educational outreach associated with the festival, celebrating the beauty of the tree and fruit as well as the rich cultural heritage and future role of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i. Recognizing ‘ulu’s traditional role in mixed agroforestry, this year’s festival will also highlight ‘ulu’s Pacific-wide companion, mai’a (banana). Artwork can incorporate ‘ulu and mai‘a, but ‘ulu must be dominant in the piece.

Artists must register for the Breadfruit Fine Art Contest at www.breadfruit.info by September 14th in order to be able to submit work, which must be dropped off at the Donkey Mill Art Center September 18-21 from 10am to 4pm. Artwork that is not pre registered by September 14th will not be accepted. All artwork will be displayed at Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas on September 29th. One winning piece will be selected and the winner will receive a gift certificate for a stay at a local luxury resort.

Young artists are invited to enter a Youth Art Contest, but they must submit through a school or community group. For the Youth Art Contest— 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners in each age category will win cash prizes ($75, $50 and $25, respectively) donated by Kamehameha Investment Corporation and a gift bag donated by Starbucks Hawai‘i.  The top winner overall will receive a Dolphin Quest Dolphin Encounter for two.

The Breadfruit Fine Art and Youth Art Contest guidelines and submission forms can be found at breadfruit.info. Questions can be directed to Andrea Dean at 960-3727 or andrea@andreadean.com.

The Fine Art Contest is organized by: Donkey Mill Art Center, Hawaii Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. Breadfruit Festival Goes Bananas is presented by Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. The festival is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Doc Buyers Fund at Hawaii Community Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, Kamehameha Investment Corporation, Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, West Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program, Ke Ola Magazine, and Big Island Resource Conservation and Development.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info or calling (808) 756-9437.

 

Puna ‘Ulu Festival Attracts Over 1,000 People

The first Puna ‘Ulu Festival took place this past Saturday, March 3, 2012 at Ho‘oulu Lāhui, the site of  Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School at Pū‘āla‘a, adjacent to the ‘Āhalanui County Park warm ponds in Puna. Despite island-wide rain, the weather at Pū‘āla‘a was clear, and the event was attended by about 1,200 people.

Kua O Ka La students serve a sumptuous buffet lunch prepared by Team Pai‘ea of Kamehameha Schools and Kamehameha Schools Land Assets Division. (All photos by Craig Elevitch)

Over 800 people enjoyed a sumptuous buffet lunch donated and prepared by Team Pai‘ea of Kamehameha Schools and Kamehameha Schools Land Assets Division featured ‘Ulu Stew (Beef and Vegetarian), Warabi and ‘Ulu Salad and ‘Ulu Bread Rolls.

Micronesians United–Big Island and Mau Piailug Satawal ‘Ohana demonstrated traditional methods of preparing breadfruit from their native lands.

Fourteen people entered the cooking contest with a variety of unique recipes—from ‘Aina Lasagna to ’Ulu and Cod Fish Salad. Winners of the cooking contest are as Ulu Quiche; 3rd – Celeste Aleah, Pahoa – ‘Aina Lasagna

Desserts:1st – Raven Hannah & Jeremy Lutes, Pahoa – Pūnana Cookies; 2nd – Eno Gerard, Pana’ewa, Hilo – ‘Ulu Custard Pie; 3rd – Courtney Spalding-Mayer Nakada Farms, Kapoho – ‘Ulu Ice Cream.

Best of Show: Raven Hannah & Jeremy Lutes – Pūnana Cookies

Healthiest Choice: Ann Kobsa – ‘Ulu Puri’al

Winners took home prizes including Tahitian Style Quilts from Kao’o Designs in Waikoloa and an assortment of gifts from Abundant Life Natural Foods, Hawaiian Force, Café Pesto, Sig Zane and Hawaiian Images of Aloha giclée prints from Suzy Papanikolas.

Many people were seen walking around with breadfruit trees they purchased and children had their faces follows:

Appetizer: 1st – Genji Nakada, Hilo – Breadfruit Chips; 2nd – Honey Burns, Pahoa – ‘Ulu dip; 3rd – Pi’ilani Chavez, Hilo – ‘Ulu & Cod fish Salad.

Entrée: 1st – Ann Kobsa, Pahoa  – ‘Ulu Puri’al; 2nd – Kua O Ka La School, Pū‘āla‘a,  – ‘painted in fanciful ways.

The public enjoyed cultural activities throughout the day—including traditional ‘ulu poi pounding with ‘Anakala Isaiah Kealoha, making poi boards from ‘ulu wood with Keone Turalde and tapa pounding from ‘ulu bark with Ka‘uhane Ben Heloca.

Chef Casey Halpern from Café Pesto demonstrated the preparation of an ‘Ulu Fritter with ‘Ohelo Reduction Sauce and Shirley Kauhaihao, a Hawaiian cultural practitioner from Kona demonstrated how to make ‘Ulu Taro Salad.

Uncle Keikialoha Keikipi conducted a ceremonial ‘ulu tree planting which commemorated the 10-year anniversary of Kua O Ka Lā PCS.

Kauhi Maunakea-Forth pounds breadfruit poi using traditional methods.

The Puna ‘Ulu Festival was sponsored by Kamehameha Schools, Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden. The Puna ‘Ulu Festival is a part of a larger statewide effort to revitalize breadfruit for food security called Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu. Lean more at:  www.breadfruit.info.

Puna ‘Ulu Festival Seeking Original Recipes for Cooking Contest

A Cooking Contest at the Puna ‘Ulu Festival calls for original recipes that feature breadfruit as the main ingredient. The Puna ‘Ulu Festival will be held on Saturday, March 3, 2012 from 9 am – 3 pm at Ho‘oulu Lāhui, the site of  Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School at Pū‘āla‘a, adjacent to the ‘Āhalanui County Park warm ponds in Puna. The event is free and open to the public. The Puna ‘Ulu Festival features a cooking contest, breadfruit trees for sale, presentations on the cultivation and care of ‘ulu trees, poi pounding, tapa making, activities for the keiki, music all day and local food featuring breadfruit.

Ulu Tamales: The Puna ‘Ulu Festival will feature a Breadfruit Cooking Contest where the public enters their favorite breadfruit recipes. Pictured here are ‘Ulu Tamales cooked by the Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School students, who won an award at the September, 2011 Breadfruit Festival. Photo Credit: Sonia R. Martinez.

The day will include a Breadfruit Cooking Contest in which the public can enter recipes in the categories of Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée and Dessert. Prizes will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each of these categories and for Healthiest Choice and Best in Show. Breadfruit Cooking Contest rules and entry forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.

Dishes can be dropped off at the Puna ‘Ulu Festival on Saturday, March 3, 2012 between 8:00 am and 10:00 am. Contest entrants must submit an Entry Form with recipe(s)—pre-registration is appreciated, but not required. Contestants are asked to bring dishes two ways—a plated 10” to 12” (or an 8 inch bowl for liquid dishes such as soups and curries) dish for presentation and judging, and a larger platter (approximately 9” x 13”) for public sampling.

In addition to displaying and sampling the cooking contest entries, cooking demonstrations will be held throughout the day featuring Chef Casey Halpern from Café Pesto, Shirley Kauhaihao, a Hawaiian cultural practitioner from Kona and the students of Kua O Ka Lā PCS. There will also be a locally sourced buffet lunch which features breadfruit.

The Puna ‘Ulu Festival is sponsored by Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Kamehameha Schools. The Puna ‘Ulu Festival is a part of a larger statewide effort to revitalize breadfruit for food security called Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu. Learn more about the Puna ‘Ulu Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info or call 965-5098.

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Four Seasons and Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods Planting 500,000 Koa “Legacy” Trees

Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Ka‘upulehu, the first and only AAA Five-Diamond and Forbes Five-Star resort on Hawai‘i Island, has partnered with Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods in planting up to 500,000 “legacy” koa trees in the native Hawaiian forest. This initiative is part of global effort of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts to plant 10 million trees around the world, in recognition of the company’s 50th birthday.

Hawaii Legacy Hardwoods

These trees, to be planted over the next few years, will significantly contribute to the reforestation of this depleted species. As ‘legacy’ trees, they will not be harvested, and will live out their natural life in the forest. Located 34 miles north of Hilo above historic Umikoa Village, this 2,700 acre sustainable forest was once home to the koa forest of King Kamehameha I, marking a historic and sacred place on the Island.

“This important initiative shows our continued commitment to doing the right thing,” says Robert Whitfield, general manager of Four Seasons Resort Hualalai. “Our partnership will allow our employees, our guests and clients to be a part of this effort in bettering our environment and Island in particular, whether by planting one tree, or a forest of trees.”

Interested guests can visit the on-property learning kiosk, adjacent to the Resort’s cultural center, during their stay to meet with a representative of Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods, to learn the details of the program and plant their seedling into a small tray. Guests will receive a certificate with a unique code, allowing them to follow their tree via GPS signal, once it is planted in the forest.

Participation fee is $40 per tree, which goes toward the planting and care of their koa seedling through the partnership with Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods, who supports The Nature Conservancy with a $1 contribution per tree sponsorship to support global reforestation.

The Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i, as well as the Boy Scouts Aloha Council and various government agencies, are involved in this important and valuable environmental initiative. “Hawaii has lost over half of its native forests since human contact,” says John Henshaw, The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii. “This partnership between Four Seasons Resort Hualalai and Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods is a step in the right direction to return the Hawaiian Forest to its former abundance.”

For more information and reservations, please call (888) 340-5662 or visit www.fourseasons.com/hualalai.

Breadfruit Festival and Art Contest Coming Up

Media Release:

Hawaii Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, are presenting the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. The Garden will also be holding a dedication for its new visitor center at 12:00 noon on the Festival day. The Festival and dedication are free and open to the public.

The Breadfruit Festival celebrates the rich culture of breadfruit (‘ulu) in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, raises awareness about the importance of breadfruit for food security and teaches about the many delicious ways to prepare breadfruit.

A highlight of the day will be cooking demonstrations by local celebrity chefs, food booths featuring breadfruit and other local favorites prepared by Hawai‘i Island’s finest chefs, and the “I Love Breadfruit” Cook-Off Contest where anyone may enter their favorite breadfruit dish to compete for prizes.

The Breadfruit Festival will also feature Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultural activities including ‘Ulumaika (breadfruit bowling), talks on the culture and history of breadfruit, ‘Ōlelo No‘eau, woodworking, quilting demonstrations, tapa making, ‘ulu poi making and more.

Workshops on breadfruit propagation, tree care and maintenance, economic opportunities, the Hunger Initiative and other topics will be given by experts Dr. Diane Ragone and Ian Cole of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

An art exhibit will feature the finalists in a fine art contest which focuses on the beauty of breadfruit, and a youth poster contest. Breadfruit trees will be available for sale on festival day, but supplies are limited and advance purchase for pick up at the festival is encouraged by contacting hooulu@hawaiihomegrown.net.

In addition to the September 24th Breadfruit Festival in South Kona, an East Side festival spearheaded by project partners Ho‘oulu Lahui and Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School will be held March 2-3, 2012.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info.

ART CONTEST CELEBRATES THE CULTURE AND BEAUTY OF BREADFRUIT

The Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu – Revitalizing Breadfruit in Hawai‘i Art Contest. The art contest is part of the educational outreach associated with the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu which will be held at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011. The contests celebrates the beauty of the breadfruit tree and fruit as well as the rich cultural heritage and future role of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

In a mauka region of Kona there was once a band of ‘ulu trees ½ mile wide and 18 miles long called kalū ‘ulu that produced as much as 36,000 tons of ‘ulu fruit per year. Today, few of these trees remain. Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project to revitalize ‘ulu (breadfruit) as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food which addresses Hawai‘i’s food security issues. The art contest will help raise awareness about the importance of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

All Hawai‘i Island artists are invited to submit original 2D media artwork to the art contest. Electronic submissions are due on July 25th for initial judging and semi-finalists will be asked to bring original work to the Donkey Mill Art Center on Thursday, August 11th for an artist’s reception and final judging. The artwork of finalists will be displayed at the Breadfruit Festival. One winning piece will be selected to be reproduced into a collectable poster commemorating the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project, which will be sold at the Breadfruit Festival and beyond as a fundraiser for the festival and project. Prizes will be awarded for best artwork.

Additional information and submission forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.