Commentary – Bureau of Interior Wants To Control New Development in North Kona

I’m deeply concerned about the actions of the National Park Service and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. These federal agencies intend to control how much new development happens in North Kona it seems.

For example, the National Park Service wants the State of Hawaii to designate the Keauhou aquifer as a water resource management area and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to assign nearly 19,000 acres of land in North Kona as a critical habitat area.  In addition, the
National Park Service was the first entity to intervene in the stalled Queen Kaahumanu Highway phase 2 widening project’s section 106 process in early 2011.

These requests, if approved, will impact all new developments in North Kona. It strips home rule authority from the County of Hawaii and adds an additional layer of bureaucracy to the entitlement process.

I firmly believe the County and State of Hawaii are in a better position to manage our resources than a bunch of bureaucrats in Washington D.C.

Aaron Stene
Kailua-Kona

Volcanoes National Park “After Dark in the Park” for January

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone: 31 Years and Still Erupting. Jan. 3, 2014, marks the 31st anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea.

NPS Photo

NPS Photo

Although the eruption has produced dramatic lava flows in past years, it has been relatively subdued in recent years, with mostly steady, but unusually weak, activity. Tim Orr, a geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review highlights from the past 31 years and talk about recent developments on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 7 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Traditional Lei Making. Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia is a kumu hula, or teacher of hula. He has taught his students at Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu since 1996, where lei making is a vital and important part of their tradition. Join Ab and his wife Puamae‘ole  O’Mahoney as they continue to teach traditional lei making. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 8, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Happenings in Halema‘uma‘u: An Update on Kīlauea Volcano’s Summit Eruption. In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that is now 520’ x 690’ in size. While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, the volcano’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an update on Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption, including an overview of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 14, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kai Ho‘opi‘i in Concert. Come enjoy an evening of Hawaiian music, through the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ‘ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai is a winner of the Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto signing contest. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 15 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking events at Kāpoho and Halema‘uma‘u in 1924. In April 1924, Kāpoho residents were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village.  In the weeks that followed, huge explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, Ben Gaddis, a long-time HVO volunteer, will tell the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s most violent eruption of the 20th century from the perspective of the people who lived through it. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 21 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kapa Kuiki: Traditional Hawaiian Quilting. Cyndy Leinani Martinez has been practicing the art of kapa kuiki since she was old enough to hold a needle, learning from her mother and grandmother about the family craft. Always passionate, Cyndy has kept the family traditions alive for more than 60 years, and is now president of the quilting club in Waimea. Join this experienced, third generation quilter as she shares the traditional art of Hawaiian quilting.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 22, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Decades of Degassing at Kīlauea: Wake Up and Smell the Coughing! As magma rises from the Earth’s mantle to the surface, the expansion of volcanic gases drives the spectacular lava fountains and flows erupted by Hawaiian volcanoes.  While Kīlauea still produces picturesque lava flows from its East Rift Zone, and its summit crater hosts a dynamic lava pond, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases which have negatively impacted downwind communities, agriculture, and infrastructure for years. Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geochemists, will offer an update about these gases, especially those related to the 2008‐2013 activity at Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and will talk about volcanic pollution (vog)—how it forms and what we’ve learned about its effects on our island environment. An optional “gas- tasting” party will follow the talk. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 28 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

National Park Service Grants $1.3 Million to Preserve and Interpret World War II Japanese American Confinement Sites

National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis today announced more than $1.3 million in grants to help preserve and interpret the sites where more than 120,000 Japanese Americans – two-thirds of them U.S. citizens – were imprisoned during World War II.

Concentration Camp“Our national parks tell the stories not only of American success, but of our failures such as the dark history of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II,” Jarvis said. “We make these grants so that present and future generations are reminded what happened and how the people survived these camps. And we make these grants to demonstrate our nation’s commitment to the concept of ‘equal justice under law’ that grew out of these and other civil rights experiences.”

The 14 grant projects include:

  • Creation of a memorial to honor Japanese Americans forcibly removed from Juneau, Alaska and sent to the Camp Lordsburg Internment Camp in New Mexico and later to the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho
  • Installation of exhibits at the San Bruno Bay Area Rapid Transit station featuring photographs by Dorothea Lange and Paul Kitagaki telling the story of forced relocation of California Bay Area Japanese Americans
  • A plan for acquisition and preservation of an abandoned root cellar, one of the few remaining original structures at the former Heart Mountain site internment site in Wyoming
  • A kiosk in a Chandler, Arizona park that focuses on daily life and the importance of baseball at the Gila River Internment Camp
  • An exhibit at the Los Angeles Go For Broke National Education Center, “Divergent Paths to a Convergent America: A 360 Degree Perspective of the Japanese American Response to WWII”
  • Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, “Exploring Honouliuli: A Multimedia and Virtual Tour” Honouliuli Internment Camp, Honolulu County, Hawaii

The Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program supports projects in seven states. Today’s grants bring grant totals to $12 million of the $38 million Congress authorized when it established the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program in 2006.

Grants from the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program may go to the 10 War Relocation Authority camps established in 1942 or to more than 40 other sites, including assembly, relocation, and isolation centers. The goal of the program is to teach present and future generations about the injustice of the World War II confinement and inspire a commitment to equal justice under the law. These are competitive grants with required matches – a dollar of non-federal funds or $2 in-kind contributions for every grant dollar.

A full list of the funded projects follows. For more details about these projects, visit: http://www.nps.gov/hps/hpg/JACS/.

For further information: Kara Miyagishima, Program Manager for the Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program, 303-969-2885 or kara_miyagishima@nps.gov

  • City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska. “Empty Chair Project”, Minidoka Relocation Center, Jerome County, Idaho and Camp Lordsburg, Hidalgo County, N.M.  $80,000.00
  • City of Chandler, Chandler, Ariz., “Nozomi Park History Kiosk”, Gila River Relocation Center, Pinal County, Ariz., $9,380.00
  • The Regents of the University of California (UC-Berkeley, History Department), Berkeley, Calif., “Japanese American Confinement in the Records of the Federal Reserve Bank”,  Multiple Sites, $18,488.00
  • Contra Costa Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, Contra Costa, Calif., “They Wore Their Best: Photographic Exhibit of the Works of Dorothea Lange and Paul Kitagaki” Tanforan Assembly Center, San Mateo County, Calif.  and 10 WRA Sites, $67,537.00
  • UCLA Asian American Studies Center, Los Angeles, Calif., “Aiko and Jack Herzig Archival Collection Project” Multiple Sites, $154,960.00
  • Japanese American Citizens League, San Francisco, Calif., “JACL Teacher Training: Incarceration and Confinement Sites”, Multiple Sites, $62,845.00
  • National Japanese American Historical Society, San Francisco, Calif., “Camp Collection: A Digital Library”, Multiple Sites, $33,467.00
  • Go For Broke National Education Center, Torrance, Calif., “Divergent Paths to a Convergent America: A 360 Degree Perspective of the Japanese American Response to WWII Incarceration”, Multiple Sites, $369,765.00
  • Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, “Exploring Honouliuli: A Multimedia and Virtual Tour”, Honouliuli Internment Camp, Honolulu County, Hawaii, $111,557.00
  • Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission, Portland, Ore., “Farm Security Administration Documentation of Agricultural Labor Internment Camps in the Pacific Northwest”, Multiple Sites: Nyssa, Malheur County, Ore.; Rupert, Minidoka County, Idaho; Shelley, Bingham County, Idaho; Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, Idaho $92,386.00
  • Nikkei Heritage Association of Washington (Japanese Cultural Center of Washington), Seattle, Wash., “Unsettled-Resettled: Seattle’s “Hunt Hotel””, Minidoka Relocation Center, Jerome County, Idaho, $102,810.00
  • Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience), Seattle, Wash., “Inspiring Future Generations: Journeying from Confinement Sites to Battlefields with Japanese American Soldiers”, Multiple Sites,$111,600.00
  • Heart Mountain, Wyoming Foundation, Powell, Wyo., “Heart Mountain Archives Project”, Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Park County, Wyo., $97,279.00
  • Heart Mountain, Wyoming Foundation, Powell, Wyo., “Heart Mountain Root Cellar Planning and Preservation Project”, Heart Mountain, Relocation Center, Park County, Wyo., $33,621.00

Total $1,345,695.00

DLNR Announces Resignation of State Historic Preservation Division Administrator

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) today announced the resignation of State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) administrator Pua Aiu. The announcement follows the release last Thursday of a report by the National Parks Service (NPS) that was critical of the division’s efforts under a two-year corrective action plan to address operational problems that jeopardize continued federal funding from NPS. Aiu has been the SHPD administrator for five years.

Pua Aiu

Pua Aiu

“We believe that SHPD has made progress in a number of areas, including hiring of qualified staff and addressing a backlog of review and compliance tasks,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR Chairperson. “However, we take this report seriously, and given the importance of SHPD to the state, we need to change the leadership in order to move forward to implement the recommendations. So we’ve accepted Pua’s resignation, and are working on a process to select a new administrator in the next three months.”

“The State Historic Preservation Division is important to the preservation and protection of historic and cultural sites of Hawaii. It also plays a significant role in the state’s economy. Addressing and balancing these complex issues is the job of the SHPD administrator and staff,” said Aila. “We plan to bring in an interim administrator by the end of July, and at the same time set up a selection committee to review applications and interview candidates. We invite qualified applicants to submit their resumes to the Chairperson at William.J.Aila@hawaii.gov”

 

New Superintendent for Pu’uhonua O Hōnaunau and Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Parks Announced

Tammy Duchesne has been selected as the new superintendent of Pu’uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historic Park and Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park on the west coast of Hawai’i.  She replaces Kathy Billings who was recently selected as superintendent of Death Valley National Park.

Tammy Duchesne

Tammy Duchesne

“Tammy has a great deal of experience working with park staffs, neighboring communities, and other agencies to create shared visions and solve problems in the Pacific,” said Pacific West Regional Director Chris Lehnertz.  “Her enthusiasm and deep professional and personal commitment to the Pacific Islands makes her a great fit for this opportunity.”

Duchesne is currently the superintendent at Women’s Rights National Historical Park in New York.  Prior to that, Duchesne was the management assistant to the National Park Service Northeast Regional Director where she served as a liaison between 76 parks and the Regional Office, helping to provide park management guidance and assistance to the field.  While Duchesne has spent years on the east coast, she has extensive experience working in Pacific Island parks and working to help tell a more comprehensive story of the Pacific Islander experience.

Duchesne served as curator and chief of cultural resources for both War in the Pacific and American Memorial Park for more than six years.  During that time she was instrumental in creating an “on-line virtual museum,” helping to open the American Memorial Park Visitor Center in Saipan and assisting in the creation of new and more inclusive exhibits at the park.  During her tenure in Micronesia, Duchesne established a digital image exchange partnership with the Micronesian Seminar in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, which enabled both institutions to better tell the story of how World War II affected Pacific islanders.  She also collaborated with the anthropology faculty at the University of Hawai’i to shed light on how World War II songs and chants captured the essence of the war experience for Micronesians.

“I am honored and humbled to have the opportunity to lead the parks, share and learn about the richness and diversity of the resources at Pu’uhonua O Hōnaunau and Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Parks and engage with the native Hawaiian community, the park staff, and our partners to protect, manage and interpret traditional sites, landscapes, and culture.  I look forward to the new challenges and opportunities and am excited to make Hawai’i home.”

Duchesne holds a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and anthropology from Tulane University, New Orleans, a master’s degree in teaching from Elms College, Chicopee, Massachusetts, a master’s degree in Micronesian Studies from the University of Guam, and a graduate certificate in museum studies from George Washington University.

Duchesne enjoys travel and learning about other cultures.  She looks forward to resuming old hobbies like long distance ocean swimming, snorkeling, outrigger paddling, and stand-up paddle boarding.  Duchesne will begin her new assignment in June, 2013.

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historic Park (www.nps.gov/kaho) is located at the base of the Hualālai volcano, along the Kona coast on the island of Hawai’i.  The 1,160 acre park was established in 1978 for the preservation, protection and interpretation of traditional native Hawaiian culture.  The park features a number of historical and cultural resources of great significance, including an ancient Hawaiian settlement and aquaculture site, ‘Aimakapa Fishpond, where fish were trapped in the massive lava walls during high tide and farmed to feed the villagers.  The park is also home to the Hawaiian black-neck stilt and the Hawaiian coot, both endangered native water birds, as well as the endangered green sea turtle.

Established in 1961, Pu’uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historic Park (www.nps.gov/puho) is a 182 acre park located on the west coast of the island of Hawai’i.  The park contains a complex of important archeological sites including ancient coastal villages, royal fishponds, and Hale O Keawe temple.  For several centuries the site was home to royals and warriors.  An adjacent area enclosed by the Great Wall served as a sanctuary for surrounding island villagers seeking forgiveness for breaking sacred laws.

New Study Provides First Direct Evidence of Feral Cats in Hawaii Killing Endangered Hawaiian Petrel

A new study by federal and university scientists has provided the first direct videographic evidence of depredation of the endangered Hawaiian Petrel by feral cats. The study affirms large amounts of earlier anecdotal evidence that feral cats are an important factor in population declines of the species and provides important additional information on the behavior of cats at petrel burrows.

Hawaiian Petrel and egg by Kauai Endangered Seabird Recovery Project

Hawaiian Petrel and egg by Kauai Endangered Seabird Recovery Project

The study, which was prepared by scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi, National Park Service, and U.S. Geological Survey, involved the monitoring of 14 Hawaiian Petrel burrows with digital infrared video cameras that produced 819 videos and 89 still photographs during 2007 and 2008 at petrel nesting areas on Mauna Loa on Hawaiʻi Island. The study confirmed the presence of feral cats at eight burrows.

The report says that the effects of feral cats on endangered birds are poorly understood because many endangered species are rare and therefore observed infrequently. In addition, some endangered species are nocturnal and occur only seasonally in remote and inaccessible environments.

All that is true in the case of the Hawaiian Petrel. This species was once numerous and widespread throughout the entire Hawaiian archipelago but now numbers only about 15,000 birds distributed in isolated breeding colonies on Kauaʻi, Lanaʻi, Maui, and Hawaiʻi Island. The birds spend most of their time at sea, and return to land only to breed in barren alpine areas and steep forested slopes, where they come and go from underground burrows nocturnally. Usually, confirmation of breeding is determined by a variety of indirect signs such as the presence of droppings, feathers, footprints, or vocalizations.

Depredation of Hawaiian Petrel adults and chicks at colonies has been frequently documented and attributed to cats based on the condition of bird carcasses and the presence of nearby cat scat.  Analysis of cat scat and stomach contents of feral cats also suggest that cat depredation is occurring. However, the technology does not currently exist to differentiate whether petrel remains came from consumption of live prey or scavenged dead animals.

One feral cat depredation event was recorded on video in 2008 and showed a feral cat waiting near the entrance of a burrow for over one hour.  When the petrel chick emerged, the cat quickly grabbed it. The remains of the chick were found 10 meters from the burrow. Evidence from an additional depredation event was documented in 2008 during a field visit by researchers, while eight other depredation events were documented during field visits in 2007.

The report says that the video data should prove useful in studying both the bird’s nesting behavior and predator interactions. “This information may prove to be beneficial for developing more targeted management strategies for a suite of endangered bird species in Hawaii,” said Dr. Steven Hess of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Videographic evidence already exists for feral cat depredation of another endangered Hawaiian bird, the Palila, while another video shows a feral cat trying to take the egg of a Nēnē, the endangered Hawaiian Goose. According to the study, other strong evidence for the negative effects of feral cats on native Hawaiian seabirds comes from the positive response of bird populations where feral cats have been controlled and from comparisons of Wedge-tailed Shearwater reproduction in the presence and absence of feral cats.

The authors point out that while the depredation of Hawaiian Petrel chicks may limit the recruitment of chicks into the population, the killing of adults by cats may have even more severe consequences.

“This species has delayed sexual maturity, low reproductive potential and extended nestling development, all of which place a premium on survivorship of the adult birds. Further, the birds also have a high degree of mate fidelity and may have difficulty replacing mates that have been depredated,” said Dr. Darcy Hu of the National Park Service.

She pointed out that the majority of numerous depredated Hawaiian Petrel carcasses found in the study area were adult birds, presumably ones that were actively breeding or seeking mates.

“These data provide yet more evidence that feral cats are having an impact on many wildlife species, but especially on birds,” said George Wallace, ABC’s Vice President for Oceans and Islands. “Feral cats are believed to have been at least partially, if not fully, responsible for the extinction of several dozen wildlife species, including the Stephens Island Wren of New Zealand and Mexico’s Guadalupe Storm-Petrel.  Management controls, such as predator control and predator-proof fencing are urgently needed to prevent that from happening to the Hawaiian Petrel.”

One such effort is underway to protect Mauna Loa’s Hawaiian Petrels. The National Park Service with support from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the American Bird Conservancy, is constructing a fence specifically designed to keep feral cats and mongooses out of important Hawaiian Petrel nesting habitat in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Once completed, the fence will protect an estimated 45 active petrel nesting sites and enclose 640 acres of prime nesting habitat.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Invites Everyone to Hikes & Programs Offered During National Park Week

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park invites everyone to join special hikes and programs offered at the park during National Park Week, April 20-28. Entrance fees are waived Monday through Friday, April 22-26.

This year’s theme, “Did You Know,” provides a fun way to get to know the park, for both visitors and local residents. For example, did you know that Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is 520 square miles, nearly as large as the entire island of O‘ahu (597 square miles)?

The special, free programs during National Park Week include the following. Please wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water.

Kīlauea Iki trail and crater will be explored in the Kīlauea Ik hike with Charlene Meyers on April 23, during National Park Week. NPS Photo/Michael Szoenyi.

Kīlauea Iki trail and crater will be explored in the Kīlauea Ik hike with Charlene Meyers on April 23, during National Park Week. NPS Photo/Michael Szoenyi.

Kīlauea Iki Crater Hike. Join master ranger volunteer Charlene Meyers on an invigorating four-mile, three-hour hike through the rain forest and onto the crater floor of Kīlauea Iki. Learn how the 1959 eruption forever changed this landscape.
Where: Meet Charlene at the Kīlauea Iki Overlook Parking lot (on Crater Rim Drive)
When: Tuesday, April 23 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Amazing Mauna Ulu. Explore fascinating volcanic features like fissures and lava trees that were formed during the 1969-74 Mauna Ulu eruption with master ranger volunteer Noel Eberz. The one-mile, one-hour round-trip hike will highlight the amazing process of plant survival on this harsh lava landscape.
Where: Meet Noel at the Mauna Ulu parking lot, four miles down Chain of Craters Road.
When: Wednesday, April 24 at 11 a.m., and again at 1 p.m.

Park Ranger Adrian Boone will lead a special trek to the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs during National Park Week, on April 25. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson.

Park Ranger Adrian Boone will lead a special trek to the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs during National Park Week, on April 25. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson.

Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs. Join Park Ranger Adrian Boone for a two-hour, 1.5-mile round-trip trek across ancient lava flows to the largest petroglyph field in Hawai‘i. Discover the meanings inherent in these rock carvings and gather a greater understanding of the native people who created them.
Where: Meet Ranger Adrian at the Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs parking area, near the end of Chain of Craters Road. (A 45-minute drive from the park entrance).
When: Thursday, April 25 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

NPS Volunteer Day. Save Hawai‘i’s native rainforest, and join forces with volunteers Jane and Paul Field to remove Himalayan ginger, faya, strawberry guava, and other invasive non-native plants that threaten the native understory alongside Halema‘uma‘u Trail. Bring garden gloves. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water.
Where: Meet the Fields at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Tools will be provided.
When: Saturday, April 27 from 9 a.m. to noon.

There are also regularly scheduled programs in the park, and at the Kahuku Unit, during National Park Week. For a complete listing, visit the park website: http://www.nps.gov/havo/parknews/20130319_pr.htm. In addition, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has special programs during National Park Week: http://fhvnp.org/events/.

The National Park Service will waive entrance fees again on July 13 (Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 33rd Annual Cultural Festival), August 25 (NPS Birthday), Sept. 28 (National Public Lands Day) and Nov. 9-11 (Veteran’s Day weekend).

Hawai‘i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on Hawai‘i Island. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2013 dates. There is no admission at Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, or along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

 

 

“Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula” in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

On Saturday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia and Tim Tunison lead the field seminar “Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula” in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Sunday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula.

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Sunday, April 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula.

“Please join us for this exciting program, following on the heels of the Merrie Monarch Festival, in which a kumu hula (hula teacher/master) and botanist team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula,” stated Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park spokeswoman Elizabeth Fien.

From kumu hula Valencia, learn about hula plants as kino lau, manifestations of Hawaiian deities in plant form (as his Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu understands them).

“There are plants for the hula altar, the kuahu, which include maile, ‘ie‘ie, ‘ilima, lehua, and halapepe.  Plus, there are adornments—mele hula plants that are worn by the dancers—which include maile, ‘ilima, and lehua, plus palapalai, ‘a‘ali‘i, pukiawe, and ‘olapa,” Valencia explained.

Participants meet at the Kilauea Visitor Center.  The day begins with a welcoming oli (chant), followed by a short walk to the kahua hula—the hula platform that overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, home to the volcano goddess Pele.

Next the group will drive to Kilauea Overlook to discuss cultural protocols used when picking plants—and to walk among native species in their natural environment, with scientific information and insight shared by botanist Tunison.

“After lunch, we’ll visit Tunison’s property in Volcano Village, where he is restoring the land to its native ecosystem.  We’ll get a hands-on lesson in native plant propagation, plus receive plant seedlings to grow at home,” said Valencia.

Valencia was born and raised in Honolulu, though his ‘ohana (family) was originally from Hilo.  He established Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu in Honolulu in 1991, and currently maintains his halau (school) in Honolulu as well as Volcano.

Tunison worked for the National Park Service for over 30 years.  He was a Botanist at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park from 1982-1994 and Chief of Resource Management from 1995-2006, when he retired.  Since then, Tunison has taught field botany, native plant propagation, and forest restoration.

This event is presented by the Hawai‘i Volcanoes Institute, a program of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a non-profit organization.  Program cost is $45 for Friends members and $65 for non-members.  Students (K-12 and college with valid student ID) are $25.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to get the member discount.

To register for the “Plants of Hula” field seminar, call 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org.

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or reasonable modification of policies and procedures to participate in this event should email institute@fhvnp.org or call 985-7373 as soon as possible, but no later than 5 days prior to the program start.

 

New Signs Promote Pearl Harbor Heritage

New historical signs known as wayside exhibits are being installed this week at various spots around Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to provide more information to inquiring visitors about historically significant sites on base.

Pearl Harbor Sign

Hawaii (Feb. 27, 2013) Builder 2nd Class Reynaldo Castro, left, and Utilitiesman 2nd Class Jeremy Orndoff, from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Self Help, install a series of wayside exhibits at USS Parche Submarine Memorial Park. The wayside exhibits enhance the landscape by providing visitors with more thorough descriptions of the landmarks and incorporating photos with information at historic sites around Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

The project took off after several years of planning by Navy Region Hawaii, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

“The idea is that when you see the wayside exhibits, it puts history in context. There’s nothing like a photograph to give one a better description of what they are looking at,” said Navy Region Hawaii Historian Jim Neuman.

There will be a total of 12 exhibits, to include locations around the former Pearl Harbor Submarine base: Lockwood Hall, the Submarine Base Chapel, Sharkey Theatre and the USS Parche Submarine Memorial Park.

Some of the exhibits include multiple signs that provide photos, historical facts and personnel profiles.

“It’s great! I think visitors will appreciate it. It shows that we understand that we have history, that we care about our history, and that we want to preserve that history,” added Neuman.

Neuman went on to say that the signs are synchronized with the National Park Service in design so visitors can see a more uniform presentation of information throughout the Pearl Harbor area.

“It’s definitely very informative when we do work like this. We learn what these various ship and submarine parts are doing here. With the pictures, it will help people understand why they put this here, why the propeller is over there, and what the memorial is all about,” said Builder 2nd Class Reynaldo Castro of the NAVFAC Self Help Seabees.

National Park Tourism in Hawaii Creates $278 Million in Economic Benefit

Part of $30 billion impact that supports 252,000 jobs nationwide

A new National Park Service (NPS) report for 2011 shows that the 4.7 million visitors to national parks in Hawaii spent $278 million in communities surrounding those parks.  This spending supported 3,330 jobs across the state.

The US Navy provides a free ferry to and from the USS Arizona Memorial

The US Navy provides a free ferry to and from the USS Arizona Memorial

“The national parks in Hawaii are great places to learn about America’s story,” said NPS Regional Director Chris Lehnertz. “We attract visitors from across the U.S. and around the world who come here to experience these parks and then spend time and money enjoying the services provided by our neighboring communities and getting to know all that this state has to offer.  The National Park Service is proud to have been entrusted with the care of America’s most treasured places and delighted that the visitors we welcome generate significant contributions to the local, state, and national economy.”

To download the report – which provides park-by-park information – visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/socialscience/products.cfm#MGM and click on Economic Benefits to Local Communities from National Park Visitation and Payroll, 2011.   The national parks in Hawaii included in this study are: Haleakala National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Kaloko-Honokohua National Historical Park, Pu’uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park, Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site, and World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument.

The information is part of a peer-reviewed spending analysis of national park visitors across the country conducted by Michigan State University for the National Park Service.  For 2011, that report shows $13 billion of direct spending by 279 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park.  That visitor spending had a $30 billion impact on the entire U.S. economy and supported 252,000 jobs nationwide.

Most visitor spending supports jobs in lodging, food, and beverage service (63 percent) followed by recreation and entertainment (17 percent), other retail (11 percent), transportation and fuel (7 percent) and wholesale and manufacturing (2 percent.)

To learn more about national parks in Hawaii and how the National Park Service works with communities to preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide local recreation opportunities, go to www.nps.gov/hi.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Creates $96,990,000 in Local Economic Benefit

Part of $30 billion impact that supports 252,000 jobs nationwide

A new National Park Service (NPS) report for 2011 shows that the 1,352,123 visitors to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park spent $96,990,000 in communities surrounding the park. This spending supported 1,177 jobs in the local area.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

“The data is exciting, for the park and for our island communities, which have always understood the positive fiscal impact of the national parks,” Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando said. “Our visitation numbers continue to rise at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, which is the most visited attraction on the island of Hawai‘i. It’s great to share that the visitors we welcome generate significant contributions to the local, state, and national economies,” she said.

In 2012, an estimated 1,483,930 people visited Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, an increase of 9.7 percent from 2011 – which was up 3.6 percent from 2010. The increases reflect a rising trend in Hawai‘i Island tourism numbers, including a 9.4 percent increase in island arrivals for  December 2012 compared to December 2011, according to Hawai‘i Tourism Authority reports.

The economic information on Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is part of a peer-reviewed spending analysis of national park visitors across the country conducted by Michigan State University for the NPS.  For 2011, that report shows $13 billion of direct spending by 279 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park.  That visitor spending had a $30 billion impact on the entire U.S. economy and supported 252,000 jobs nationwide.

Most visitor spending supports jobs in lodging, food, and beverage service (63 percent) followed by recreation and entertainment (17 percent), other retail (11 percent), transportation and fuel (7 percent) and wholesale and manufacturing (2 percent.)

To download the report visit www.nature.nps.gov/socialscience/products.cfm#MGM and click on Economic Benefits to Local Communities from National Park Visitation, 2011.

The report includes information for visitor spending at individual parks and by state.  In 2011, an estimated 4,784,285 people visited the seven national parks in Hawai‘i that report visitation numbers, an increase of 6.5 percent from 2010. Their spending totaled $278,163,000, and supported 3,329 jobs statewide.

To learn more about national parks in Hawai‘i and how the NPS works with communities to preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide local recreation opportunities, go to http://www.nps.gov/hawaii.

 

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Ranger Earns Top Honors for Search-and-Rescue Training

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Law Enforcement Ranger Nainoa Keana‘aina is the first-ever recipient of the Honor Graduate Award from the National Search and Rescue Academy (NSARA).

National Park Law Enforcement Ranger Nainoa Keana‘aina

National Park Law Enforcement Ranger Nainoa Keana‘aina. NPS Photo by Jay Robinson.

The intensive six-week NSARA program was conducted at the Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains at 7,000 feet, near Bridgeport, CA. The training provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, incident command systems, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, helicopter rescue techniques, remote emergency medical responder training, and more.

Keana‘aina served as class president and incident commander, and was selected by his fellow classmates for the Honor Graduate Award.

“Nainoa exemplified personal leadership skills and a commitment to learning during the intensive six-week academy,” said NARSA Coordinator Ken Phillips. “He is the sort of professional responder that a search and rescue (SAR) coordinator desires to have on a SAR team.”

The physically demanding NSARA training was conducted by the National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense. To broaden inter-agency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel jointly attended the academy.

 

 

National Park Service Releases Final Plan & EIS for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates

The National Park Service (NPS) has released a Final Plan and Environmental Impact Statement (plan/EIS) for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Volcanoe EIS

The plan provides a park-wide framework to systematically guide non-native ungulate management activities in a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery and provides desirable conditions for active ecosystem restoration. It also supports protection and preservation of cultural resources.

The NPS’s preferred alternative includes a progression of management phases, monitoring, and considerations for the use of management tools; a population objective of zero non-native ungulates, or as low as practicable, in managed areas; complete boundary fencing for Kahuku and ‘Ōla‘a rainforest; and potential use of localized internal fencing to assist in the control of non-native ungulates. Control techniques would be primarily lethal, but non-lethal techniques could also be considered. Volunteer programs would continue, but modifications would be required for lethal removal programs to meet current NPS practices.

The plan/EIS is available online: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/havo_ecosystem_feis. After a required 30-day waiting period following release of the plan/EIS, the NPS will finalize its choice of alternative in a record of decision.

 

12 Fee-Free Days at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2013

Mark your calendars for these entrance fee-free dates at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2013:

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

  • January 21, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and volunteer to remove invasive ginger on Halema‘uma‘u Trail, 9 a.m. to noon. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Bring raingear, long pants, long-sleeved shirt, hat, water, hiking shoes, gloves, loppers and snacks and/or lunch. Walk-ins welcome. For details, contact Park Ranger Adrian Boone by phone (808) 985-6019, or email adrian_boone@nps.gov. Entrance is free all day.
  • April 22-26, National Park Week. America’s best idea – national parks – is even better when it’s free! Five days of no entrance fees at all fee-collecting national parks.
  • July 13, 33rd Annual Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival. The popular cultural festival returns to the summit of Kīlauea, at the Kahua Hula overlooking Halema‘uma‘u Crater, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., but entrance is free all day.
  • August 25, National Park Service Birthday. The National Park Service was founded on Aug. 25, 1916. Celebrate America’s best idea all day at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, which was founded Aug. 16, 1916.
  • September 28, National Public Lands Day. This year marks the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day, the largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands in the United States. Hawai‘i Volcanoes will provide details on its volunteer service projects at a later date.
  • November 9-11, Veterans Day Weekend. Three days of no entrance fees to honor and acknowledge the sacrifices and service of America’s veterans.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on the Island of Hawai‘i. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2013 dates. Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, and the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail do not charge entrance fees. Information on special offerings at parks nationwide is available at http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

 

Natalie Gates Named as Haleakala Superintendent

Natalie Gates has been selected as the new superintendent of Haleakalā National Park on the island of Maui in Hawai`i.  Dr. Gates has worked at Point Reyes National Seashore in California for the last twelve years, first as a wildlife biologist, and then as chief of natural resource management.  She will transition to her new duties at Haleakalā in March.

Natalie Gates

Natalie Gates

“Natalie has a strong track record in the protection of native species and ecosystems.  She has proven she can solve complicated issues while respecting all the voices in the room,” said Pacific West Regional Director Chris Lehnertz.  “Natalie’s deep respect for diverse cultures and communities and her team building skills will be an asset to Haleakalā National Park.”

Dr. Gates graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Biology.  She earned a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, and a Master’s degree in Wildland Resource Management from the University of California at Berkeley.  She has worked in small animal veterinary clinics New York, Hawai`i and California.  During her career in the National Park Service (NPS), in addition to her experience at Point Reyes, Dr. Gates has worked as acting superintendent of Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area in eastern Washington and has completed detail assignments with the NPS Office of Legislation and Congressional Affairs in Washington, D.C. and with the Office of Communications and Public Affairs at the NPS Pacific West Regional Office.  In 2009 she was awarded the Pacific West Regional Director’s Award for Natural Resource Management.

Haleakalā National Park is one of the oldest in the National Park System, established as part of Hawaii National Park in 1916, just weeks prior to the creation of the National Park Service itself.  It was renamed in 1960 when it was split from what then became Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park on the island of Hawai`i.  Haleakalā encompasses both rain forests and arid ecosystems in lands ranging from sea level up to 10,000 feet, as well as significant Native Hawaiian cultural sites.

In accepting the position Dr. Gates said, “It will be an absolute privilege to work with the staff of Haleakalā National Park and local communities around it.  Haleakalā is home to a treasure of cultural resources, natural resources and wilderness, and I look forward to working hard to preserve them.”  She added: “I plan on being an avid student of Haleakalā – its stories and its vital importance to Native Hawaiians.”

In the coming weeks, Dr. Gates plans to move to Maui with her husband, Courty, their three sons, and their Labrador retriever.

 

National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks Sponsor First-Ever Reading Aloud Event

National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks Sponsor First-Ever December 7th Reading Aloud Event with 6,000-Plus Students across Hawaii—11 Big Island School Participate

Every December 7th, thousands of people from around the world gather at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center in Honolulu to pay tribute to the thousands of military service members and civilians who lost their lives in the name of freedom in 1941.  For the few surviving Pearl Harbor survivors who are able to make the trek to this sacred place, their message to future generations is clear:  Remember Pearl Harbor, the tremendous sacrifice that was made that day, and the terrible consequences of war.

USS Ronald Reagan

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (Aug. 31, 2011) Sailors and Marines render honors as the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) passes the USS Arizona Memorial while entering Pearl Harbor for a port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin B. Gray

For the first time ever, the National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks shared the historical significance of that day with 6,000-plus school-age children across Hawaii with a simultaneous reading aloud program at 3 p.m. on December 7.

Through the Department of Education’s and the Island of Hawaii YMCA’s A+ Afterschool Care Programs, Big Island students at 11 schools joined their peers from across the state in learning about the real life story of an unlikely friendship between the late Pearl Harbor Survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese Fighter Pilot Zenji Abe.

Thousands of elementary and intermediate school children in A+ Afterschool Care Programs heard the true life story of an unlikely friendship between Pearl Harbor survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese diver-bomb pilot Zenji Abe through the reading of “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”

Thousands of elementary and intermediate school children in A+ Afterschool Care Programs heard the true life story of an unlikely friendship between Pearl Harbor survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese diver-bomb pilot Zenji Abe through the reading of “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”

Participating Hawaii Island schools included De Silva Elementary, Keaukaha Elementary, St. Joseph School, Keaau Elementary, Honokaa Elementary, Waimea Elementary, Kohala Elementary, Kealakehe Elementary, Holualoa Elementary, Kamehameha Schools and the YMCA’s Club Y Teens program.

The children’s book, entitled “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship,” is a story of peace and forgiveness and how these men, who were once enemies of war, overcame their hatred and fear for one another.

“As stewards of the USS Arizona Memorial and World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, the National Park Service’s mission is to preserve and share the history of the Pacific War, including what took place at Pearl Harbor 71 years ago,” said National Park Service Superintendent Paul DePrey.

“Sharing the message of peace and reconciliation amongst thousands of young children across Hawaii is significant.  The story of Richard Fiske and Zenji Abe is proof that through friendship and peace, we can make this a better world for future generations.”

Pearl Harbor Book

Pacific Historic Parks purchased 175 copies of the book to provide to each participating school. Pacific Historic Parks, a cooperating association that assists the National Park Service, supports the education, preservation, development and interpretation of four National Park-managed historic sites throughout the Pacific, including Pearl Harbor.

A marine bugler on the USS West Virginia, Fiske witnessed the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the massive destruction that happened at the hands of Japanese fighter pilots.  For many years, his heart was filled with anger and hatred for the Japanese and his health suffered because of this.  Hospitalized due to the stress of his anger, he knew he had to forgive the Japanese for what they had done in the name of war or face imminent death due to his failing health.  In 1991, during the 5oth Anniversary Pearl Harbor Symposium, Japanese Fighter Pilot Zenji Abe offered an apology for the attack to members of the Pearl Harbor Survivors and extended his hand in friendship.  Fiske accepted his apology and the two became friends. As a symbol of peace and friendship, Abe gave Fiske $300 and asked him to lay two roses at the Arizona Memorial each month, one for him and one for Fiske.  He also asked Fiske to play the taps on his bugle after he did this.  Fiske honored this request every month until he passed away in 2004.

“Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship” is a children’s book written by Pearl Harbor civilian survivor and author Dorinda Nicholson.  The book, which has won numerous national awards including the International Reading Association’s Children’s and Young Adult’s Book Award, is written as a correspondence between the author and her granddaughter, recounting the story of two World War II veterans—an American Marine and a Japanese pilot-—whose lives intersected in war at Pearl Harbor and again in reconciliation fifty years later.

Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School, reads “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”  Photo: Fern Gavelek Communications

Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School, reads “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.” Photo: Fern Gavelek Communications

“It’s a very inspirational book and the second time I read it, I cried,” says Hakunani Anakalea, group leader at the A+ program at Holualoa Elementary School. “The book makes the emotions of the characters come alive and illustrates the importance of forgiveness.”

Fifth grade student Anuhea Kainoa-Cho shared that the book had a good story and added, “I learned about protecting others and why people should make up when they disagree.”

Hakunani Anakalea reads to the students

“Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship,” can be purchased online at www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org, phone 1-888-485-1941. As part of its reading aloud program, the National Park Service has posted several other real life stories of Pearl Harbor survivors on their website for parents to read to their children.  Go to www.nps.gov/valr/forkids.

 Witness To History Videoconference Program

The National Park Service, with funding from Pacific Historic Parks, also offers a year round distance learning program for students and teachers from around the world.  Witness To History is a free program that utilizes videoconferencing technology to take students where visitors cannot go, bringing the sites and stories of Pearl Harbor to children and adults unable to visit Oahu.  The program includes a Pearl Harbor Survivor Series where participants can see and hear Pearl Harbor Survivors share their personal testimonies of what they experienced on that fateful day.  The Interpretive Ranger Series shows a video of a USS Arizona underwater dive while a National Park Ranger provides a voice-over interpretive lesson.  The program ends with a student and educator question and answer session.  For more information or to schedule a free Witness To History videoconference, contact 808-954-8744 or 808-4428.

 

Reading Aloud Event with 6,000 Students Across Hawaii, 11 Big Island Schools Participating

National Park Service and Pacific Historic Parks Sponsor First-Ever December 7th Reading Aloud Event with 6,000 Students across Hawaii, 11 Big Island Schools Participate.

Through the Department of Education’s and the Island of Hawaii YMCA’s A+ Afterschool Care Programs, Big Island students at 11 schools will join their peers across the state to read the award-winning book, “Pearl Harbor Warriors: The Bugler, The Pilot, The Friendship.”

Pearl Harbor Book

The children’s book relays the real-life story of an unlikely friendship between the late Pearl Harbor Survivor Richard Fiske and Japanese Fighter Pilot Zenji Abe. It is a moving story of peace and forgiveness and how these men, who were once enemies of war, overcame their hatred and fear for one another.

Pacific Historic Parks purchased 175 copies of the book to provide to each participating school. Pacific Historic Parks, a cooperating association that assists the National Park Service, supports the education, preservation, development and interpretation of four National Park-managed historic sites throughout the Pacific, including Pearl Harbor.

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Parks Joins Other National Parks Waiving Entrance Fees Veteran’s Day Weekend

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park joins all 398 national park units across the country in waiving entrance fees for the upcoming Veteran’s Day weekend, Nov. 10-12.

On the rainforested trail near Thurston. NPS Photo/Jessica Ferracane

“We are indebted to the sacrifices our veterans have made for our country’s freedom and heritage,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “The National Park Service invites all veterans to reconnect with their country through their national parks this weekend, and throughout the year,” she said.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, which counts dozens of veterans among its employees and volunteers, is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The park offers more than 150 miles of hiking trails and many opportunities to appreciate the volcanic landscape, the pristine native environment and the Hawaiian culture that define this magnificent World Heritage Site. More than a dozen free interpretive programs are offered daily, and special events, including ‘Ike Hana No‘eau cultural workshops, After Dark in the Park presentations, hula kahiko performances, and Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” concerts, are ongoing. Check www.nps.gov/havo for information for all events.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is one of five national park units on the Island of Hawai‘i. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge Veteran’s Day weekend. There is no admission at Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, or along the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

Information on special offerings at parks nationwide is available at http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

The National Park Service has posted a video about veterans on YouTube: http://pacificislandparks.com/2012/11/06/veterans-day-2012-national-park-service/

 

Local Artist Commissioned to Create Posters Commemorating Sainthood of Mother Marianne Cope

Standing in front of Bishop Home where she ministered to girls and women suffering from Hansen’s disease, Saint Marianne Cope has been honored in a new work of art commissioned by Pacific Historic Parks (PHP).

The just-released 12” x 18” poster commemorates Saint Marianne’s canonization, which took place on October 21. It was designed by O‘ahu artist Nick Kuchar and uses a combination of rich hues, shapes and text to create a unique retro look.

“Saint Marianne’s canonization is an incredible event that holds so much meaning to our local community,” said Brad Wallis, President and CEO of Pacific Historic Parks. “We felt it was important to commission a local artist who would understand the historical significance of this event and be able to tell the story of Saint Marianne through the use of art.”

The poster is available exclusively at PHP’s Kalaupapa National Historical Park Bookstore and online at www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org. PHP, a cooperating association that assists the National Park Service (NPS), supports the education, preservation, development and interpretation of four historic sites throughout the Pacific. Proceeds from the sale of the Saint Marianne poster will support education and research at Kalaupapa NHP.

“The support we receive from Pacific Historic Parks plays an integral role in our ability to maintain the historical integrity of our national parks, including Kalaupapa National Historical Park,” said Steve Prokop, NPS Superintendent at Kalaupapa NHP. “Our partnership with PHP helps us to meet our mission of preserving the natural and cultural resources of our parks and to educate visitors on the historical significance of each site. Saint Marianne’s interpretive poster is a perfect example of how this partnership allows us to share her story with the world.”

In 1888, Saint Marianne established Bishop Home for women and girls in Kalaupapa, a small community located on Moloka‘i’s northern peninsula where Hansen’s disease patients were sent to live in isolation from 1866-1969. Saint Marianne spent 35 years helping these patients and lived on Moloka‘i until her death in 1918. The National Park Service and Hawai’i State Department of Health now manage the area.

Pacific Historic Parks also commissioned Kuchar to create a poster honoring Saint Damien, who was canonized in 2009. According to Kuchar, “I feel extremely honored and blessed to be able to create one-of-a kind tributes to these two great humanitarians in Hawai’i.”

For more information on the Saint Marianne poster, contact Sarah Safranski, Communications and Publications Manager, Pacific Historic Parks at ssafranski@pacifichistoricparks.org or visit www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org.

State Historic Preservation Division Continues Progress in Meeting Federal Compliance

In its latest report to the National Park Service (NPS), the State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) noted it is on track in meeting the NPS Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

The NPS has oversight of SHPD under the National Historic Preservation Act. In March 2010, SHPD was placed on High Alert Status and issued a CAP to be completed within two years. SHPD continues to make progress and has completed a number of areas identified in the CAP including:

  • Developing Standard Operating Procedures for Survey and Inventory and Review and Compliance
  • Developing procedures for the Hawai’i Historic Places Review Board
  • Certifying the County Certified Local Government programs
  • Developing a Historic Preservation State Plan
  • Hiring adequate staff including a Geographic Information Specialist

“We are grateful that the current Administration has enabled us to meet the CAP to this point through support of our funding requests and support of our staff,” stated Pua Aiu, SHPD administrator. “There is still work to be done and we plan on meeting all elements identified in the CAP.”

SHPD has until February to finalize details of the CAP requirements, at which time NPS will do a site visit and determine whether the State has satisfactorily met all elements of the CAP.

Elements of the CAP that SHPD is still making progress on include:

  • Securing a Maui Archaeologist, Hawai’i Archaeologist, IT specialist and Librarian. Two other positions (Kauai Archaeologist and CLG Specialist) will require a change of funding. These positions must be hired by June 30, 2013. For the time being the functions of those positions are being met by existing staff.
  • Digitizing SHPD Inventory and Intake. SHPD and State Parks have developed a plan to implement Docushare’s tracking system for all documents in the SHPD system. SHPD will start with incoming documents and work on inputting existing files and documents over time. Full implementation of Docushare is expected by February 2013.
  • Upgrading the Graphic Information System (GIS) to make it available to all staff and to the public. NPS detailed staff to assist SHPD with this goal and SHPD hired a GIS specialist to work on implementation and maintenance of the GIS. NPS also approved the purchase of 12 new computers with GIS capacity so all reviewers will have access to GIS information. SHPD is requesting funding for 11 additional computers so all staff can have GIS access.

A draft of the State Plan has been submitted to and reviewed by the Washington Office of NPS. It is on track to be final by October 30, 2012. The draft included input from the public and was made available for public review in early September.

A copy of the Narrative Report submitted to NPS will be available on the SHPD http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/shpd.

The State Historic Preservation Division of the Department of Land and Natural Resources works to preserve and sustain reminders of earlier times which link the past to the present. SHPD’s three branches, History and Culture, Archaeology, and Architecture, strive to accomplish this goal through a number of different activities. The division’s statewide Inventory of Historic Properties contains information on more than 38,000 historic sites in Hawai’i.