Hawaiian Electric Companies Introduce New Logo

The Hawaiian Electric Companies today introduced a new logo that represents the companies’ roots in the islands as well as their commitment to developing a better energy future for Hawaii.

HELCO Logo

“We’re proud of our long history of service to our islands. At the same time, we know we need to continue to change and do better,” said Dick Rosenblum, Hawaiian Electric president and CEO. “We’re working hard to lower bills for our customers, improve our service, and develop more low-cost clean energy. The logo is a symbol of those commitments.”

Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawaii Electric Light Company have initiated ambitious projects to deliver on these commitments. Some of the latest actions include:

  • Pursuing, with Public Utilities Commission approval, five new low-cost renewable energy projects on Oahu – including four solar farms and one wind farm – with a combined capacity of 64 megawatts
  • Making it easier, faster, and cheaper for customers to install photovoltaic projects (as of August 2013, there were more than 34,000 installed PV systems across the companies’ service territories with a combined capacity of approximately 250 megawatts)
  • Planning the deactivation of older, less efficient utility generating units on Oahu, Maui and Hawaii Island for a combined 226 megawatts – about 14 percent of generation owned by the utilities

In the coming weeks, the companies will be announcing more projects to lower bills, improve service and develop more low-cost renewable energy.

“With oil prices driving up electric bills, we know how tough it is for our customers. Through projects like these, we’re working to bring customers some relief,” Rosenblum said. “This won’t happen overnight, but these are steps to help get us there.”

An estimated 18 percent of the electricity currently used by customers on Oahu and Hawaii Island and in Maui County comes from renewable resources, already ahead of the state’s goal of 15 percent by 2015. So far this year, this use of clean energy has saved customers an estimated $243 million by reducing oil use by 1.9 million barrels.

The new logo was developed by respected designer Sig Zane of Hilo and combines traditional Hawaiian design elements with a modern look. Zane worked on the design with his wife, cultural expert Nalani Kanakaole, and their son Kuhao. They drew upon Hawaiian Electric’s 122-year history for their inspiration.

“From the very beginning, when King Kalakaua pioneered electricity at Iolani Palace and chartered Hawaiian Electric, the company has played a key role in Hawaii’s growth. We wanted to create a design that captures that history and reflects the way the company connects our communities,” Zane said.

Our New Logo:
A Symbol of Where We’ve Been, Who We Are, and Where We’re Going

AN IMPORTANT MOMENT IN TIME

At Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawaii Electric Light Company, we’re proud of our long history of service to our communities. But we know it’s not enough for us just to look back. Looking forward, we know we can and need to do better. At the top of our priority list:

  • Lowering bills for our customers
  • Improving service
  • Developing more low-cost clean energy

As we reaffirm our responsibility to our customers and communities, we’ve introduced a new logo – one that represents our deep roots in these islands as well as our commitment to creating a better energy future for Hawaii.

A REFLECTION OF OUR HERITAGE

The new logo was developed by respected Hilo designer Sig Zane and combines traditional Hawaiian design elements with a modern look. Zane worked on the design with his wife, cultural expert Nalani Kanakaole, and their son Kuhao. They drew upon Hawaiian Electric’s 122-year history for their inspiration.

“From the very beginning, when King Kalakaua pioneered electricity at Iolani Palace and chartered Hawaiian Electric, the company has played a key role in Hawaii’s growth,” Zane said. “We wanted to create a design that captures that history and reflects the way the company connects our communities.”

Learn more about the story behind the logo by watching the video on this page.

The cost of designing and introducing the logo is not included in customers’ electric rates. To save on costs, the logo is being phased in gradually through the normal course of business.

A SYMBOL OF OUR COMMITMENTS

Today we reaffirm our commitment to our customers – to lower bills, improve service and develop more renewable energy. To deliver on our commitments, we’re taking a number of important steps:

  • Pursuing low-cost renewable energy projects to reduce our use of high-priced oil
  • Continuing to help customers to install solar power
  • Planning the deactivation of some of our older power plants
  • Modernizing our systems and electric grids to improve reliability
  • Improving customer service with new technology and added staff

While the logo is an important symbol of our commitments, we know that, in the end, our actions will speak the loudest. So each and every day, we’re working hard to live up to what our logo represents. And we look forward to working with you, our customers and communities to achieve a clean energy future for Hawaii.

In the coming months, customers will begin to see the logo on company websites, signs, vehicles, uniforms, ID badges, and mailings. To save on costs, the logo will be phased in gradually through the normal course of business. For example, existing inventories of materials will be used up before replacement items that carry the new logo are ordered.

Winners Announced of the 7th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival

Winners of the 7th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival were announced Saturday night to an enthusiastic crowd at Waikoloa Bowl in Queens’ Gardens.  Awards were presented to Makua Solo, Wahine Solo and Wahine Hālau, after three nights of competition in ancient Kahiko and modern ‘Auana divisions.  (Kupuna Hālau and Solo winners were announced on Friday).

Sig Zane, Mary Jane Kamoku, Nalani Kanakaole and Kumu Alberta Nicolas

The top-scoring Wahine Hālau was Hui Hula Naleikalākupua (1,102 points) from Japan, under the direction of Kumu Hula Yukiko Hanayama.  In second place was Hawai‘i Island’s own Beamer-Solomon Hālau O Po‘ohala (1,089 points), Kumu Hula Hulali Solomon Covington.  Covington’s niece, Leiomalama Solomon, won the Wahine Solo title; she performed “Kimo Hula,” composed by her great-great-grandmother Helen Desha Beamer, for the ‘auana selection.

Hulali Solomon Covington, Leiomalama Solomon, Nalani Kanakaole and Kuhao Zane

Fourteen hālau—seven from Japan, six from Hawaii and one from Mexico—competed in the three-night event, which also featured Hawaiian cultural workshops and Made-in-Hawai‘i Marketplace during the day at Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort and Spa.

Kuhao Zane. Sig Zane, Kumu Yukiko Hanayama and Nalani Kanakaole

WINNERS 7th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival:

  • 2nd Place Makua Solo Hula: Kyushu Hawaiian Association Kamalu Lani, 490 points, Kumu Hula: Keiko Ito Soloist: Sanami Hayashi
  • 1st Place Makua Solo Hula: Hula Hālau Kahula O Hawai‘i, 545 points, Kumu Hula: Kyoko Kubokawa, Soloist: Miyuki Iota
  • 3rd Place Wahine Hula: Kyushu Hawaiian Association Kamalu Lani, 1,084 points, Kumu Hula: Keiko Ito
  • 2nd Place Wahine Hula: Beamer-Solomon Hālau O Po‘ohala, 1,089 points, Kumu Hula: Hulali Solomon Covington
  • 1st Place Wahine Hula: Hui Hula Naleikalākupua, 1,102 points, Kumu Hula: Yukiko Hanayama
  • 3rd Place Solo Hula: Koga Mamina Hula Studio, 1,009 points, Kumu Hula: Mamina Koga, Soloist: Hiromi Sato
  • 2nd Place Solo Hula: Hula Hālau Kahula O Hawai‘i, 1,018 points, Kumu Hula: Kyoko Kubokawa, Soloist: Megumi Toyosawa
  • 1st Place Solo Hula: Beamer-Solomon Hālau O Po‘ohala 1,086 points, Kumu Hula: Hulali Solomon Covington, Soloist: Leiomalama Solomon
  • 3rd Place Kūpuna Hula: Hui Hula Naleikalakupua, 598 points, Kumu Hula: Yukiko Hanayama
  • 2nd Place Kūpuna Hula: Hula Hālau Plumeria Kamalu Lani, 618 points, Kumu Hula: Harumi Soejima
  • 1st Place Kūpuna Hula: Hālau I Ka Wekiu, 634 points, Kumu Hula: Karl Veto Baker and Michael Casupang

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts.  Sponsors include Waikoloa Beach Resort, the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority/County of Hawai‘i CPEP Program and others.  For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com/updates.

5th Annual Moku O Keawe International Festival Celebrates Hula

Workshops and Special Appearance by O’Brian Eselu

Media Release:

Moku O Keawe International Festival returns November 4-7 with cultural workshops, international hula hālau, and the opportunity to see Kumu Hula O’Brian Eselu and the men of Ke Kai O Kahiki on the big stage at Waikoloa Bowl.

Members of Aulani Hula Halau compete in the 2008 Moku O Keawe Hula Competition (photo by Michael Darden)

The fifth annual comprehensive, colorful and creative celebration of hula takes place November 4 – 7 at Waikoloa Beach Resort.  The Festival brings kama‘āina, visitors and international participants in a four-day schedule with entertainment, hula competition, cultural workshops, island marketplace and closing with the Hō‘ike Night performances.

International competition, Thursday-Saturday, November 4-6, Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens. Moku O Keawe brings together hālau from Japan, the U.S. Mainland and Hawai‘i in a hula competition in Kupuna, Hula Kahiko and Hula ‘Auwana group and solo divisions. Experience Moku O Keawe this year with great ticket prices: $5 Lawn seating, $10 Reserved.

·         Kahiko competition, Thursday, November 4, 6:00 p.m.

·         Kupuna competition and awards, Friday, November 5, 6:00 p.m.

·         ‘Auwana competition and awards, Saturday, November 6, 6:00 p.m.

Hawaiian Cultural Workshops. As masters of hula, the judges of the competition are asked to share their knowledge through workshops.  The insights and experiences from each kumu hula is offered on a personal basis, allowing participants a unique opportunity.  In both hula kahiko and hula ‘auwana, the various lineages of the kumu hula are unique forms in style, repertoire, and interpretation.   There are also opportunities to learn how to make the ipu heke, the standard implement providing the percussion to the dance.  A unique opportunity this year will be the excursion to Mahukona where the student will be taught a hula written for that beautiful site.

Education continues to drive the Moku O Keawe Foundation and it is with these classes that the knowledge from one school is shared with another.  Nalani Kanakaole, Howard Ai, Uluwehi Guerrero, and Kaleo Trinidad are the judges for this year.  Registrations for the classes are limited.  Applicants are urged to register early as spaces are limited and students are urged to register early by visiting www.MOKIF.org.

Hawai‘i Marketplace. Friday and Saturday November 5 and 6, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. at the Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa. The unique Made-In-Hawaii Marketplace features some of the best products from the Island of Hawaii.  Hula implements, fresh lei, silk-screened clothing, woven lauhala hats and purses, and jewelry, are some of the offerings at the special marketplace.

Hō‘ike Night.  Sunday, November 7, 6:00 p.m., at Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens. An important facet of a hula lesson is the public performance as it then brings the student in front of an audience to showcase what was learned.  Moku O Keawe is delighted to share the students of the hula workshops in the Hō‘ike.  Also featured at the final night of the event is a very special appearance by Kumu Hula O’Brian Eselu and his men of Ke Kai O Kahiki.  The hālau has garnered many awards in the Merrie Monarch Festival and has often walked away with the trophy for the overall winner in the most prestigious competition of hula.  Tickets for Hō‘ike Night are Lawn seating $10, Reserved $20.

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts. For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com

Hilton Waikoloa Presents… Hawaiian Elegance Brunch

Sponsors Note:

The Vanguardist

She’s done it for many years. Dressing bodies has been part of Nalani’s life, over and over. There were performances back in the 60s that required calls to feature color, movement, and form. The use of natural materials like hau, lauhala, and raffia, brought added dimension to the silhouette. Each year at the Merrie Monarch Festival, costuming at Wednesday night’s ho`ike is her creative idea.

With all things, Nalani has been a trendsetter. She is capable of new applications to bridge tradition and contemporary and become the modern example. Often times, the simple twist of a decades old idea becomes the canvas for the twenty-first revolution. The ability to be the forefront is best described as part DNA and part visionary.

This weekend we feature Hoku Malama, the first fashion show featuring Nalani Kanakaole. Designed for the women of substance, we celebrate styles that are fresh, architectural, and totally flattering. I am tickled. Again. I love the creative genius that Nalani is.

September 5, 1:00 pm, Monarch Ballroom, Hilton Waikoloa – See you there!

Aloha,
Sig