• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    October 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  

42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races August 30 through September 2, 2013

The 42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races starts Labor Day holiday weekend, Friday August 30 through Monday September 2, 2013. The world’s largest long distance canoe race is organized and hosted by Kai Opua Canoe Club, started 1929 in Kona. The Queen’s Race attracts 6-person crews from Hawaii, all throughout the U.S. and international crews from as far away as Australia, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, Cook Islands, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Tahiti and United Kingdom.

Kai Opua Header

The 2013 Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races include the signature 18-mile long distance single hull 6-person canoe race for men and women crews; 6-mile men and women Wa‘a kaulua (double hull canoes) races;  stand-up paddleboard races including a stock 3.5 mile course and an unlimited 4.5 course sponsored by Hulakai, surfing Hawaii since 1963, OC1-man, OC2-man and Teen long distance canoe races.

Back for its fourth year is the Ali’i Challenge, blend of Survivor and Amazing Race, that includes a paddling distance of almost 17.5 miles followed by each crew of 12 negotiating a land course. Other Queen’s Race events include Walking Tour of Historic Kailua Village, International Paddlers Night, Torch Light Parade through Historic Kailua Village, Ocean lifestyle street fair, Queen Lili’uokalani Awards Ceremonies and a traditional Hawaiian Luau.

The 42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races is sponsored by Hawaii Tourism Authority, Queen K Tesoro, Steinlager, Seven Tiki Spiced Rum, OluKai and Courtyard Marriott King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel.

For detailed race information, course maps or to register online for the 2013 Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races, log onto www.kaiopua.org

Another Mile of Ane Keohokalole Highway to be Completed

The County of Hawai`i and contractor Nan Inc. have entered into a $3.24 million agreement that will complete an additional mile of Ane Keohokalole Highway.

The Keohokalole Family, descendants of Ane "Annie Keohokalole," mother of Kalakaua, Liliuokalani and Leleiohoku, following a tour of the Ane Keohokalole Highway site. Second from left is family friend John DeFries, president of Hokulia.

This will be a road parallel and about a mile mauka of the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway from Palani Road to Hina-Lani Street in Kaloko. The entire two and a half miles of highway is scheduled to open at the same time in May.

“Public Works has done an incredible job at keeping this project on time and under budget,” said Hawai’i County Mayor Billy Kenoi. “Because of this, we are in position to build another mile of road.”

Native Hawaiian descendants and government officials visit an ancient cave in the path of the Ane Keohokalole Highway. Lead archaeologist Rowland Reeve of Pacific Legacy, right, provides interpretation.

The additional mile of highway will consist of two lanes with a concrete surface and enough space to expand to four lanes. There will also be some resurfacing work at Hina-Lani Street as well as added left-turn pockets.

This expanded highway will open at the best possible time. The state’s Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway widening project between Honokohau Harbor and Kona International Airport will no doubt cause traffic delays, and a completed Ane Keohokalole Highway will give motorists an alternative route when traffic is heavy.

It is also good news for those who rely on public transportation to get to and from work, shopping and play. County Mass Transit has committed to establish a transit bus loop using Ane Keohokalole Highway and the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway.

Archaeologist Rowland Reeve discusses a test pit in the kauhale area of the Ane Keohokalole Highway. Both the county and the landowner, Queen Liliuokalani Trust, sought additional assurances that no human remains were in the area before construction on the highway began. In the photo above, a cairn was excavated and found to be a mound of stones created when farmers cleared the surrounding farmable lands.

Ground was broken on the first phase of the $29.9 million Ane Keohokalole Highway project on March 30, 2010, and was originally planned as a mile and a half of highway from Palani Road to the West Hawai`i Civic Center. The project represents not only the largest expenditure of federal stimulus money in Hawai’i, it also is one of the first major roads to be built by Hawai`i County in Kona since statehood.

The project, awarded to Nan Inc. of Honolulu, also involves two preservation efforts at each end of the road. An interpretive center and cultural preservation area valued at more than $3 million is being built by Queen Liliuokalani Trust at the Palani Road end of the project, while a $500,000 partnership between the county, Stanford Carr Developments and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to preserve one of Hawai`i’s last remaining dryland forests is underway at the Hina-Lani Street intersection.

Ane Keohokalole Highway will also facilitate the state’s development of the state’s Kamakana Village affordable-housing project, commercial development by the Queen Liliuokalani Trust to support children’s programs, and the Department of Hawai`ian Home Lands’ expansion of Laiopua Village and its planned community center.

“We are not just building a road,” said Mayor Kenoi. “With affordable homes, shelters for the homeless, places to work and play, a way to get to college, commuter buses and bike paths we are facilitating the creation of a safe and vibrant community.”

Palace Performance Honors ‘Merrie Monarch’

Media Release:

The Daughters of Hawai‘i present a free concert 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21 at Hulihe‘e Palace to honor King David Kalakaua (1836-1891), former palace curator Aunty Lei Collins and bandmaster Charles ‘Bud’ Dant. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his hula halau, Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

The brother of Queen Lili‘uokalani, Kalakaua became king by election, rather than birthright, in 1874. He was from a long line of chiefs from the island of Hawai‘i; his queen was Kapiolani.

“During Kalakaua’s reign, music thrived due to royal patronage,” says Fanny Au Hoy, docent coordinator. “He loved the performing arts, especially music.”

The king played the piano and composed chants and mele (songs) in both Hawaiian and English. Nicknamed the “Merrie Monarch,” Kalakaua also embraced Western music and promoted the playing of the ‘ukulele. He composed the words to the kingdom’s national anthem, “Hawai‘i Pono‘i,” which was set to music by his Royal Hawaiian Band.

“Kalakaua was a Renaissance man for Hawaiian arts,” adds Au Hoy. “Kalakaua felt the political survival of his kingdom depended upon the cultural revitalization of the Hawaiian people. He included mele oli (chant) and hula in the king’s 1883 coronation and 1886 jubilee.

“The king enjoyed visiting Kona, bought Hulihe‘e Palace and remodeled it,” explains Au Hoy. “He stuccoed the exterior, plastered the interior and enlarged the ocean lanai. The home took on a Victorian air with crown and gold leaf picture moldings and crystal chandeliers. Ever the Merrie Monarch, Kalakaua furnished Hulihe‘e with the finery needed for entertaining: china, glassware, satin cushions, rugs and paintings.”

Kalakaua visited Washington, D.C. and brought about a reciprocity treaty of duty-free commerce with the U.S. He also sailed around the world in 1881 to promote Hawai‘i’s sugar industry. During this period, different countries attempted to take control of several Pacific islands. A group of foreigners, with the help of a military unit, forced the king to sign the Bayonet Constitution in 1887, taking away most of his power. Kalakaua died in 1891 on a trip to San Francisco and Lili‘uokalani, his regent, became queen.

After closing for earthquake repairs in December 2007, Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2010 Hulihe‘e Palace Concert Schedule:  4 p.m. on the palace grounds

  • Jan 17: Band Concert remembering King Kamehameha II “Lunalilo” and Aunty I’olani Luahine
  • Feb 21: Hula Concert remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 21: Band Concert remembering Queen Ka’ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 18: Hula Concert remembering Prince Albert
  • May 16: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 13: Band Concert remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 18: Hula Concert remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 22: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 19: Band Concert remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 17: Hula Concert remembering Princess Kai‘ulani
  • Nov 21: Band Concert remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 12: Hula Concert remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop