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61G Lava Flow Continues to Stream Into Ocean

The 61g lava flow continues to stream into the ocean, with two entry points observed today: the original one, where lava first entered the ocean on July 26…

Lava Beachand a smaller one to the west.
lava beach 2
The ocean entries are adding lava to the rubble at the bottom of the sea cliff.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Black sand—formed by the interaction of hot lava and cool seawater, as well as by wave erosion of the rocky cliff—is also accumulating along the coastline.

A close-up view of the main ocean entry, showing the accumulation of lava and black sand at the base of the sea cliff.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Today, HVO’s geology field crew gathered data near the 61g lava flow vent on the eastern flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Click to see full screen

Click to see full screen

Lava Flow Front Remains Active on Coastal Plain, But Little Forward Movement

The flow remains active on the pali and coastal plain, with scattered breakouts of pāhoehoe lava. Over the past week, however, the leading tip of the flow has advanced only a short distance. Today, the flow front was 850 m (0.5 miles) from the ocean.

In this photograph, the current lava flow is the lighter color area in the center of the photo.

In this photograph, the current lava flow is the lighter color area in the center of the photo.

Only a few short sections of road in Royal Gardens subdivision remain uncovered by lava.

In this kipuka, about 200 m (220 yards) of Orchid Street is still exposed.

In this kipuka, about 200 m (220 yards) of Orchid Street is still exposed.

This photograph looks downslope at the uppermost section of the Episode 61g flow.

The vent is in the lower left corner of the photo. Several collapses have occurred over the lava tube, and the trace of the tube can be seen by the fuming sources extending downslope.

The vent is in the lower left corner of the photo. Several collapses have occurred over the lava tube, and the trace of the tube can be seen by the fuming sources extending downslope.

The large hole on the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō remains open, providing a view of forked lava streams.

Since the last overflight on Friday, July 15, the lava streams have started to crust over, reducing the glow in the pit.

Since the last overflight on Friday, July 15, the lava streams have started to crust over, reducing the glow in the pit.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Adds New Live Webcam to View Lava Flow 61G

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has added a new live web camera so that folks can view the new Lava Flow “61G” from the comforts of your own home:

Click to view

Click to view

This image is from a research camera positioned on Holei Pali, looking east towards Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana.

Click here to view at anytime:  Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana

Disclaimer:
The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views through volcanic gas. At times, clouds and rain obscure visibility. The cameras are subject to sporadic breakdown, and may not be repaired immediately. Some cameras are observing an area that is off-limits to the general public because of significant volcanic hazards.