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Kona Historical Society and Ke Kai Ola Present Free Monk Seal Lecture

Kona Historical Society is pleased to partner with The Marine Mammal Center’s Ke Kai Ola: The Hawaiian Monk Seal Hospital to present “A Natural History of the Hawaiian Monk Seal,” the April installment of the 2017 Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series. The lecture is free to the public and is scheduled for Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:30pm at the West Hawaii Civic Center.
 
During their presentation, Ke Kai Ola’s outreach and rescue staff will explore the natural history of the Native Hawaiian Monk Seal, including the historical and cultural significance of this endangered species. Hawaiian Monk seals are native to Hawaii and are not found anywhere else in the world; they are also the most endangered animal species in the world. In 2014, The Marine Mammal Center opened “Ke Kai Ola” (“The Healing Sea”) a hospital and education center dedicated to caring for injured, ill, and orphaned Hawaiian monk seals and returning them to the wild.
For the past six years, Kona Historical Society has offered this community lecture series, spotlighting local and state speakers on a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. It is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long and it is presented in cooperation with the County of Hawaii. The lectures are free of charge and open to all, residents and visitors alike.

Kona Historical Society Announces Name Chosen for Baby Donkey

Kona Historical Society has something to sing about. The nonprofit has given its new baby donkey a name: Mele. The name announcement occurred March 1 after Kona Historical Society conducted a three-week-long voting contest on its website and at its Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook.

Voting contest generates $1,254 in donations for nonprofit

Mele was the top contender, generating a total of 640 votes. The name was nominated by Cindy Wittemore, Ashley Chamberlain, Donna S. Starr and Jiraphon G on Kona Historical Society’s and the farm’s Facebook Pages. “Many Kona coffee farmers used Mele as their name for female donkeys,” says Miki Izu, a local kupuna, long-time coffee farmer and Kona Historical Society volunteer. Mele also refers to the chants, poems, and songs of Native Hawaiians. For Kona Historical Society staff, the new donkey’s braying song reminds us of Kona’s rich traditions.

In addition to Mele, the public was given four other options, including Shizu (262 votes), Florence (174 votes), Lucy (160 votes) and Manini (18 votes). Each vote was a dollar donation. Voters helped generate a total of $1,254, which will be used for the support and care of animals at the historic 5.5-acre farm, as well as for supporting Kona Historical Society’s educational programs and other needs.

“We’re excited to name our new baby donkey Mele, which would have been a traditional name for a female donkey on an early 20th century Kona coffee farm. This traditional name fits perfectly with our commitment to preserve and share Kona’s stories,” said Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “We’re also grateful for everyone who voted and donated. We look forward to using the money for Charlie and his new bestie Mele.”

The 7-month-old female donkey arrived Jan. 31 at the Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm and was the result of a crowdfunding campaign, which sought a companion for the historic farm’s approximately 30-year-old donkey, Charlie, and upgrades to his home. Kona Historical Society plans to eventually use Mele to demonstrate some of the jobs Kona Nightingales performed on coffee farms, such as hauling coffee and other farm goods. Mele is currently undergoing training. Until Mele is deemed ready, she will mostly serve as Charlie’s companion and visitors to the farm will be able to observe the budding friendship from afar.

“Charlie and Mele have been getting along well,” said Assistant Farm Manager Joel Pearson. “We’ve noticed Mele is sweet and very smart. One of her favorite things to do is to chase the chickens out of the farm pasture.”

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

Details about the “Charlie Needs A Bestie” crowdfunding campaign and project are available at www.razoo.com/story/Charlie-Needs-A-Bestie. For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Zumba at The Shops – Yoga at the Farm

The Shops at Mauna Lani premiers Zumba Fitness on Sunday afternoons starting March 5, 2017, in partnership with Dance 4 Action. Dance 4 Action combines Zumba and fundraising for community nonprofits on Hawaii Island. Their August 2016 Zumba event raised $3,500, which were much needed funds for the West Hawaii Domestic Abuse Shelters.

Photo: Courtesy Dance 4 Action

The Shops is proud to partner with Dance 4 Action, and to offer creative physical fitness activities for residents and guests of the Kohala Coast.  Participants are encouraged to wear sneakers, bring a water bottle and towels. The cost of the class is $10 for adults and children are free. Check-in and registration begins at 3:30 p.m., class takes plance 4-5 p.m. at Center Stage.

For more information, contact Ronnie Claveran, 222-7103.

Discover a whole new way to start your Fridays. Kona Historical Society invites the public to its Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook, where yoga instructor Elizabeth “Liz” Aschenbrenner guides guests every Friday morning through a series of uplifting stretches, toning poses and peaceful meditations during Yoga On The Farm.

These “drop in” outdoor hatha yoga classes strive to benefit the minds and bodies of beginners and experts alike. Each class, participants greet the sun with sun salutations, as well as enjoy a variety of poses, including the warrior series, cat, cow, downward dog and child’s pose. Aschenbrenner is a certified yoga instructor who has been practicing yoga for more than 20 years. Her style of yoga aims to help you connect with your breath while developing strength, mobility and stability. Her classes are truly accessible to all, regardless of age, body type or fitness level. Still, Aschenbrenner advises participants to first check with their doctor before starting something new, including yoga.

Yoga On The Farm participants practice yoga barefoot and on the farmhouse lawn. Kona Historical Society has a couple of yoga mats for newcomers to use, but if you plan to attend regularly, please consider bringing your own mat. After class, all participants enjoy a complimentary cup of 100 percent Kona coffee.

Yoga On The Farm supports Kona Historical Society’s education and outreach efforts. It is a membership benefit and free for all Kona Historical Society members. Classes cost $10 each for nonmembers. Annual Kona Historical Society membership starts at $35 and information is available at www.konahistorical.org/index.php/khs/membership. Reservations are not required to attend Yoga On The Farm.

The Yoga On The Farm schedule for March is as follows:

  • March 3 – from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m.
  • March 10 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 17 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 24 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 31 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

Kona Historical Society Offers A Tasty Tradition

Kona Historical Society will make its famous Portuguese cinnamon bread to celebrate Shrove Tuesday. This special bake will happen on February 28 at Kona Historical Society’s stone oven, or forno, located in the pasture below its main office and its historic general store museum in Kealakekua.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the public is invited to watch Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers create these sticky, sweet loaves of cinnamon bread. Attendees will also learn about the traditional art of Portuguese bread making and the contributions of the Portuguese, who arrived in Hawaii in the 1880s. While many of these immigrants worked in the sugar plantations, a fair number did find their way to Kona dairies and are credited for helping develop this industry.

Kona Historical Society makes cinnamon bread on Shrove Tuesday to pay homage to the days of the sugar plantations of the 1800s, when resident Catholic Portuguese would mark the day by eating richer, fatty foods and desserts before the ritual fasting of the Lent season, which lasts 40 days. They would often use up butter and sugar prior to Lent by making large batches of malasadas, the well-known and beloved Portuguese doughnut without a hole. Shrove Tuesday is also known as Fat Tuesday.

Cinnamon bread loaves, each costing $8, can be purchased starting at 12:30 p.m. Bread sales are on a first come, first served basis and go until 4 p.m. or everything is sold out. Proceeds go toward supporting the Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For those who can’t make it to this special bake, consider joining Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers every Thursday at the forno for its weekly Portuguese bread baking program. During this free program, the crew bakes close to 100 loaves of white, wheat and sweet bread and the public is invited to lend a hand by helping roll the dough.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Makahiki Traditions to be Explored in Free Kona Historical Society Lecture

Kicking off Kona Historical Society’s 2017 Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series, cultural practitioner Shane Akoni Nelson will discuss the various functions of the Makahiki season, its importance to society prior to 1820, and how its traditions continue today. His lecture, “Makahiki Traditions,” is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the West Hawaii Civic Center, located at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway in Kailua-Kona. It is sponsored in memory of Roland Dupree.

Makahiki is the annual four-month season in ancient Hawaii when work and warfare ceased. People devoted their days to games, sports, hula and leisure, as well as to strictly observing rules and taboos. Makahiki was observed in honor of the god Lono.

Nelson, also a producer and scriptwriter, is dedicated to the empowerment of Hawaiian people, particularly to those in South Kona on Hawaii Island.

For the past six years, Kona Historical Society has offered this community lecture series, spotlighting local and state speakers on a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. It is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long and it is presented in cooperation with the County of Hawaii. The lectures are free of charge and open to all, residents and visitors alike.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

List of Names for Baby Donkey Narrowed to Five

The newest member of the Kona Coffee Living History Farm – a 6-month-old female donkey –  needs a name and the public is being asked to help the Kona Historical Society decide what it will be.

Starting today (Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017), fans worldwide will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite name by making a $1 donation at the farm or on Kona Historical Society’s website, www.konahistorical.org. All donations will be used for the support and care of animals at the farm. Any donations in excess will go towards supporting Kona Historical Society’s educational programs and other needs.

The baby donkey arrived Jan. 31 at the historic 5.5-acre farm in Captain Cook and was the result of Kona Historical Society’s “Charlie Needs A Bestie” crowdfunding campaign, which sought a companion for the farm’s approximately 30-year-old donkey, Charlie, and upgrades to his home.

Over the past six days, there was an overwhelming response to Kona Historical Society’s call for suggested names. The public submitted a total of 125 suggested names on the Kona Historical Society and Kona Coffee Living History Farm Facebook Pages.

On Monday (Feb. 6), a Kona Historical Society committee selected the following top five finalist names:

Florence (“Flo”) – Nominated by John Gavelek, Cathy Watkins, Terri Olsem, Balbi Brooks, and Leilehua Yuen

Kona’s coffee farm donkeys are known worldwide as “Kona Nightingales” for their distinctive “song.” Another famous Nightingale is Florence Nightingale, a social reformer and founder of modern nursing. Perhaps the new donkey will demonstrate the same compassion as her human Nightingale predecessor.

Lucy – Nominated by Mary K. Soria and and Jody Holman Webster

In Charles Shultz’s beloved comic strip Peanuts, Lucy van Pelt is one of Charlie Brown’s closest friends. She’s often temperamental, bossy, and opinionated…which happens to be a pretty good description for a stubborn donkey as well! Hopefully, our Charlie will find the new donkey’s advice a little more useful that what can be found at Lucy van Pelt’s Psychiatric Booth.

Manini – Nominated by Lindsay Sieberg

Manini are small fish that can be found in Hawaii’s coral reefs and are a favorite among local kupuna. They are distinctive for their narrow black stripes, similar to the stripe on our donkeys’ shoulders. To avoid predators, manini live in large schools. With the addition of the new donkey, we’re happy to have our own “school”— or herd —of donkeys.

Mele – Nominated by Cindy Wittemore, Ashley Chamberlain, Donna S. Starr, and Jiraphon G

“Many Kona coffee farmers used Mele as their name for female donkeys,” says Miki Izu, a local kupuna and long-time coffee farmer. Mele also refers to the chants, poems, and songs of Native Hawaiians. Maybe the new donkey’s braying song will remind us of Kona’s rich traditions.

Shizu – Nominated by Pixie Navas and Leslie Christman

In Japanese, “shizu” means quiet and clear, and is the nickname for a few of Kona’s residents. Shizuka Uchida was a proud daughter of the Kona Coffee Living History Farm’s founding family. Shizuko Teshima was a long-lived, devoted businesswoman who established Kona’s famed Teshima’s Restaurant. Shizu Kahikina was a dedicated woman who worked on Pu`u Wa`awa`a Ranch. The name Shizu is a testament to Kona’s humble and hardworking women.

“We narrowed the nominations to names that were clearly very popular among social media followers and names that are significant to Kona’s history and culture,” said Kona Coffee Living History Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “We love that everyone is as excited about the new donkey as we are. We’re grateful to everyone that suggested names.”

Voting online and at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm happens now until Feb. 27. The farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays and is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. There is no limit to the number of times fans may vote. It’s a $1 donation per vote. The winning name will be announced on March 1.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society and Kona Coffee Living History Farm on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society Welcomes Baby Donkey – Public Can Submit Names

Charlie, the approximately 30-year-old donkey at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, got a late Christmas present. His new bestie, an estimated 6-month-old female donkey, arrived Jan. 31, 2017, at Kona Historical Society’s 5.5-acre historic farm in Captain Cook.

This new donkey is part of Kona Historical Society’s first-ever crowdfunding campaign, “Charlie Needs A Bestie,” which project aimed to get Charlie a friend and an upgraded home. At the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, these donkeys are ideal ambassadors for helping tell the story of Kona Nightingales.

“Donkeys were a crucial part of Kona coffee farm families in the early 20th century. Coffee farming was and is labor-intensive and would have been near-impossible without donkeys,” said Kona Coffee Living History Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “I’m very excited about bringing a second donkey to the farm. Our campaign inspired interest from visitors from all over the world. I know that they will all be pleased to know that Charlie has a bestie!”

Yamagata Farms, a South Kona family farm started in 1898, donated the young donkey to Kona Historical Society on Dec. 27, 2016. Yamagata Farms has been paying for its feed, board and training with Kala’i Nobriga of K.N. Performance Horses at Mahealani Ranch. Nobriga is an established horse trainer in the state of Hawaii. Over the past couple of weeks, he has been teaching the baby donkey to lead, as well as to be comfortable when handled and when surrounded by crowds. He thinks the donkey is adjusting well and describes her as shy, but curious.

The baby donkey was brought this week to the Kona Coffee Living History Farm for some acclimation. Later in February, she will be receiving additional training with Nobriga at Mahealani Ranch. Following this training, she will make a permanent return to the farm. Kona Historical Society plans to eventually use her to demonstrate some of the jobs Kona Nightingales performed on coffee farms, such as hauling coffee and other farm goods. Until the donkey is deemed ready, she will mostly serve as Charlie’s companion and visitors to the farm will be able to observe the budding friendship from afar. Kona Historical Society staff believe the good-natured Charlie will befriend her and can serve as a mentor to the juvenile donkey as she grows into an adult.

This new donkey will soon reach one of her most important milestones yet — getting her name. She will be named on March 1, 2017. From now until Feb. 5, 2017, the public is invited to submit names on Kona Historical Society’s Facebook Page. A Kona Historical Society committee will select the top three to five names, which will be announced on the Society’s Facebook Page, website and at the farm. Fans worldwide will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite name by making a $1 donation at the farm or on Kona Historical Society’s website. All donations will be used for the support and care of animals at the farm. Voting opens Feb. 7, 2017, and closes Feb. 27, 2017.

Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii, launched the “Charlie Needs A Bestie” campaign Dec. 9, 2015, on Razoo.com. By January 31, 2016, Kona Historical Society raised roughly $9,658.16 for the project from more than 90 donors.

Over the course of a year, the farm’s pasture was transformed, thanks to community collaboration and partnerships. During the summer of 2016, Steven Equipment cleared the farm’s pasture areas that were once overgrown with invasive plants while Affordable Tree Care trimmed overgrown trees and removed unwanted trees. A group of teens and their leaders from Wilderness Adventures spent a couple of hours removing weeds around the hitching post and in the farm’s front entrance pasture that Charlie likes to spend time in. This fall, Paradise Lawn & Garden Care installed the new fencing and utilized the 70 kiawe posts, which were donated by The Nature Conservancy from its Kiholo Preserve and delivered to Kona Historical Society by volunteers. Kona residents Aaron Mitchell and Kai Auld, updated the plumbing and installed a self-watering trough. A crew of volunteers from Ali’i Woodtailors cleaned up the stall area and built the hitching rails. Hardwoods Hawaii donated wood for rails, which Kona Historical Society volunteers Jack Nessen, Ted Quist and Stephen Ratcliff installed to enclose the pen.

In the future, Kona Historical Society hopes to make improvements to stone walls in the pasture area and expand the stall for feed and equipment storage. The Society will likely start planting grass, particularly suitable for the donkeys’ diets, in the lower pasture later this spring.

“The community was a crucial component in making improvements to our pasture and bringing the second donkey to the farm,” Miculka said. “We’re excited to now have the community play an active role in naming her.”

The award-winning Kona Coffee Living History Farm tells the stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers during 1920-45. It is the only living history coffee museum in the U.S. Located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110, this historic farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society Awarded $28,000 Grant From Hawaii Tourism Agency

Kona Historical Society has been awarded a $28,000 grant from Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) to support its Hands On History program at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook. This engaging and interactive program allows visitors and residents the opportunity to experience first-hand traditional crafts, trades, practices and foodways that were common on an early 20th century Kona coffee farm.

“We are very grateful that HTA will be supporting this successful program for a second year. The grant enables Kona Historical Society to share traditional practices that, in many cases, can be experienced nowhere else,” said Gavin Miculka, Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director and Farm Museum Manager. “With this grant, the Kona Coffee Living History Farm becomes a unique venue for shared experiences between visitors and residents that facilitates deeper connections to Kona’s rich history and culture.”

Kona Historical Society, a community-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit and Smithsonian Museum affiliate, will use the funds from the HTA Community Enrichment Program to support unique interpretive talks and hands-on living history demonstrations, each featuring one of 10 activities, hosted by staff members and volunteers. The activities are roasting coffee using traditional home methods, lauhala weaving, Japanese calligraphy, traditional medicinal gardening, sustainable vegetable gardening, Japanese pickling, mochi making, tofu making, Sashiko crafts, and Japanese floral arrangement. Hands On History will happen two times each week and be offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the farm.

Kona Historical Society launched Hands On History at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in March 2016 with support from a grant from Hawaii Tourism Authority and Hawaii County’s Research and Development Department. At the time, the program was offered only once a week and featured eight activities. The program quickly grew in popularity and now demands more days.

For four decades, the Kona Historical Society has collected, preserved and shared the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii through its educational programs, historic sites and preservation projects. Its Kona Coffee Living History Farm is a “must see” Hawaii attraction and the only living history coffee museum in the nation. A self-guided experience, visitors talk story with the costumed historians while discovering the history behind Kona’s famous gourmet crop and the people who helped make the industry what it is today. The farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays and is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society to Close Store Museum in Preparation for Special Exhibit

The H.N. Greenwell Store Museum in Kealakekua is closing its doors from January 23 to March 27 as the Kona Historical Society prepares a special exhibit.

Sharing the rich history of coffee in Kona through the eyes of families and farmers who built the lucrative industry, Kona Historical Society will present the award-winning exhibit, “The Kona Coffee Story:  Along the Hawaii Belt Road.” The exhibit is slated to run March through November in the H.N. Greenwell Store Museum.

With the introduction of coffee to Kona in 1828, the development of Kona’s world-famous coffee industry experienced its highs and lows. Voices of hard working coffee farmers and community leaders can be heard through personal accounts, historic photographs and artifacts featured in this exhibit, all of which tell the compelling story of the early days of Kona coffee.

A product of extensive community collaboration led by the Kona Japanese Civic Association and the Japanese American National Museum, Kona Historical Society’s renewal of this world-traveled exhibit offers visitors the opportunity to be inspired by stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers and learn more about the deep roots of Kona’s coffee heritage and culture.

The H.N. Greenwell Store Museum’s regular programming is temporarily discontinued while Kona Historical Society Collections staff installs “The Kona Coffee Story: Along the Hawaii Belt Road” and while this exhibit is running in the historic general store museum. Kona Historical Society apologizes for any inconvenience the temporary closure may have caused.

As an alternative, Kona Historical Society encourages the public to explore its other historic site, the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook, as well as participate in its educational programs such as the Portuguese Stone Oven Bread Baking Program and Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series. Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society to Host Online Membership Drive

Kona Historical Society is hosting its first-ever month-long online new membership drive via Facebook. Starting Nov. 10 and ending Dec. 9 on Kona Historical Society’s Facebook Page, the drive aims to recruit 100 new members by offering special membership rates, new membership levels and benefits, as well as special weekly challenges with prize drawings generously provided by Hawaii Island sponsors, such as the Kona Brewing Co., Body Glove Hawaii and Kohanaiki. The drive will also feature posts about the special resources Kona Historical Society protects and the services it offers.

kona-historical-society-facebookAs a community-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Kona Historical Society relies on the support of its membership to help fund the essential role it plays in collecting, preserving and sharing Kona’s and Hawaii’s history. Kona Historical Society members are part of large and growing ohana of people who appreciate and support the important roles that history, culture and the arts provide on our island and state. Members are the lifeblood of Kona Historical Society, and annual membership dues, which start at $35 for individuals, provide the organization with a major source of vital revenue to cover day-to-day needs and special projects.

Supporters of Kona Historical Society will be able to purchase membership by calling 808-323-3222 or going to store.konahistorical.org. Information about membership and the various levels is available at www.konahistorical.org/index.php/khs/membership. Be a part of Kona Historical Society’s Online Membership Drive at www.facebook.com/konahistoricalsociety.

Founded in 1976, Kona Historical Society is the only museum in West Hawaii with permanent and rotating exhibits, as well as a full docket of public programming. Over the past four decades, it has provided public space, free or deeply discounted school and other educational programs and lectures throughout the year, access to unique and significant Hawaii collections and artifacts, stewardship and financial care of two State- and National-registered historic sites and structures, and more than 10 acres of State Legacy Land reserves. Every year, Kona Historical Society serves thousands of people through its work, which gives a clear-eyed view of what Hawaii’s rich, complex and multiethnic community truly looks like and is.  Kona Historical Society has garnered dozens of awards and commendations for its museums, historic structures and public programs.

Kona Historical Society Lecture Series Continue June 27th

Voices From the Edge: Hawai‘i’s Ancient Trails and Their Message Today

What can we learn from the ancient Hawaiian trails? How do they connect us to earlier times and what are the thoughts today about access? Dr. Richard Stevens will touch upon these topics and more in the sixth lecture in Kona Historical Society’s Hanohano O Kona Lecture Series at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 27 at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center.

During his slide show, which features images by the late Hawaiian artist Wailehua Gray, Stevens will discuss Hawai‘i’s ancient trails, their lessons for the present, their connections to the past, and their current imperiled status. Also on his agenda are access issues and the influence of these trails on land use decisions.

A Vietnam veteran who earned his Ph.D. in history at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Stevens teaches history at the UH Center West Hawai‘i. In addition, he has worked as a “trail hunter” for the State Division of Forestry and Wildlife and the UH Research Corporation. He’s an author as well, having written books about Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh Trail and articles about Hawaiian trails for Honolulu Magazine.

This is the June portion of a community lecture series for 2012 that spotlights local and state speakers on a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. Presented by Kona Historical Society, in cooperation with the County of Hawai‘i, this lecture series is a gift from the society to the community that has supported it for so long.

Free of charge, the lectures are open to all, residents and visitors alike. Further information is available at 808-323-3222.

The Story Behind Kona Historical Society Kona Coffee Living History Farm

The story of Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm begins with the Uchida Farm.

Find out how the only living history coffee farm in the nation got its start. This video was made in 1999 as the farm was just beginning.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/JtKT3kfjFvs]

Now, with its completion over 10 years ago, you may stroll through the award-winning Kona Coffee Living History Farm that tells the story of Kona’s coffee pioneers during the 1920’s, “talking story” with costumed historians and discovering the history behind Kona’s gourmet crop.

Come join us! You won’t leave this place without feeling you have experienced a rare glimpse into Hawai`i’s colorful past. www.konahistorical.org