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Hawaii Forest Institute Awarded HCF Grant

Arthur Lawrence Mullaly Fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation Provides Dryland Forest Restoration and Community Volunteer Opportunities

Media Release:

The Hawai’i Forest Institute (HFI) has been awarded an $8,000 grant from the Arthur Lawrence Mullaly Fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation for the Ka’upulehu Dryland Forest Restoration and Education project. This volunteer outreach project provides dryland forest restoration and forest stewardship opportunities at Ka`upulehu Dryland Forest Preserve in North Kona.

HYCC Intern David Cadaoas gives planting instructions to students at Ka`upulehu. Photos by Brad Ballesteros

HFI, in conjunction with community partners, is working to sustain fragile endangered dry forest ecosystems and share their unique historical, cultural, restoration, and scientific aspects to benefit Hawai’i residents and visitors. Volunteers will receive a hands-on, land-based, learning experience to effect positive change in the areas of responsibility, stewardship, and interdependency of all living things.

Enthnobotanist Jill Wagner gives planting instructions to eager volunteers at Ka`upulehu

In 2010, 150 volunteers will participate in stewardship learning events at Ka`upulehu Dryland Preserve. Site stewardship activities will include planting seedlings, collecting and distributing seeds, building trails, and pulling weeds. The project also includes invasive weed control and creating web pages and news articles documenting stories and photographs of the
A portion of this grant will help sponsor the Mauka-Makai Ka`upulehu “Connection Not Forgotten” talk story evening, which is planned for February 25, 2010 at the Kalaemao Cultural Center in North Kona. Speakers Ku’ulei Keakealani, Yvonne Yarber Carter, Keoki Apokolani Carter, and Wilds Pihanui Brawner will address ahupua’a perspectives connecting land and people, mauka-makai, through a cultural ecology partnership. Restoration, science, cultural history, and contemporary relationships to the land are vital components to the perpetuation of a dynamic Ka’upulehu dryland forest and coastal ecosystem. A grant from Hawai’i County’s Department of Research and Development is also assisting with sponsorship. Call HFI at 808-933-9411 to RVSP for this free informal talk story by February 19.

Other project supporters include: Kamehameha Schools, Bishop Museum, Kukio Resort, and Hawai’i Forest Industry Association.

Dryland Forest Grant Awarded

Media Release:

The Hawai’i Forest Industry Association (HFIA) has been awarded a $10,000 grant from Hawai’i County’s Department of Research and Development for its Ka Pilina Poina ‘Ole, “Connection Not Forgotten” project. This community-driven project provides interpretive materials and forest stewardship opportunities that connect two naturally and culturally significant destinations in North Kona; Ka’upulehu Dryland Forest Preserve and Kalaemano Cultural Center.

With grant monies, HFIA has already initiated the project, which involves sustaining fragile endangered dry forest ecosystems and sharing their unique historical, cultural, restoration, and scientific aspects to benefit Hawai’i residents and visitors. A Mauka-Makai (mountain to ocean) “Connection Not Forgotten” informal talk story evening is being planned for February 25, 2010 at the Kalaemano Cultural Center at 6 PM. Call 808-933-9411 no later than February 19 to RVSP for this free event.

Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator Yvonne Yarber Carter has started developing educational and interpretive materials, stories for an audio story center, and curriculum for the stewardship outreach program. The story center will feature live voices from oral histories, bringing connections to the past alive. Educational materials include field learning guides for youth visitors. These rich remembrances and cultural stories are made possible through a partnership with the gifted Ku’ulei Keakealani, Director of the Ka’upulehu Cultural Center at Kalaemano, who has deep ancestral ties to the lands…

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