• Breaking News

  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • RSS Mayor Kenoi’s Blog

  • RSS Pacific Business News

  • Say When

    December 2014
    M T W T F S S
    « Nov    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  
  • When

  • RSS World Wide Ed

  • RSS Pulpconnection

Admiral Harry B. Harris Jr. Assumes Command of the Pacific Fleet from Admiral Haney

With the USS Arizona and Battleship Missouri Memorials as a backdrop, Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr. relieved Adm. Cecil D. Haney as commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet during a change of command ceremony on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Oct. 16.

With Adm. Samuel Locklear III, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, right, looking on, Adm. Cecil D. Haney passes through the side boys after being relieved by Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, right center, during a change of command ceremony on the Pearl Harbor waterfront, Oct. 16. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Johans Chavarro)

With Adm. Samuel Locklear III, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, right, looking on, Adm. Cecil D. Haney passes through the side boys after being relieved by Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, right center, during a change of command ceremony on the Pearl Harbor waterfront, Oct. 16. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Johans Chavarro)

“The only thing that makes my departure a little easier is knowing that my good friend and Naval Academy classmate Adm. Harry Harris is my replacement,” said Haney. “He has had an exceptional career filled with challenging assignments that have more than prepared him to command the Pacific Fleet. He knows the Indo-Asia-Pacific region and fully understands its complexities.”

Haney spoke of those complexities, and how the Navy’s historic role in the region will continue to promote security, stability, prosperity and peace.

“Our nation today looks to the future as we rebalance to the Indo-Asia-Pacific,” said Haney, who assumed command in Jan. 2012 near the beginning of the rebalance initiative. “The world watches to see how economically and politically this rebalance will work. We’ve faced austere economic cycles and political turmoil in the past, but we’ve maintained a continuous, robust and capable naval presence in the Pacific since World War II.”

The official party salutes the colors during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Johans Chavarro)

The official party salutes the colors during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Johans Chavarro)

“Given the consistent message of our political and military leadership, I can stand on firm ground and predict that the U.S. will remain a Pacific power far into the future,” Haney said. “It has been fantastic to see new capability join this vibrant theater … the new littoral combat ship, Virginia class submarine, EA-18 Growlers, MV-22 Ospreys, and MH-60 Romeo and Sierra helicopters.”

“As excited as I am about our new platforms, I am even more excited about the rebalance of intellectual focus and leadership attention to a region where trillions of dollars of trade flows,” Haney said. “Given the uncertainty in the region regarding friction over sovereignty claims and certain nation state provocations, we must continue to maintain a combat-ready Fleet while working peaceful solutions using existing international norms and multilateral approaches.”

Adm. Locklear pins the Distinguished Service Medal on Adm. Cecil D. Haney during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David Kolmel)

Adm. Locklear pins the Distinguished Service Medal on Adm. Cecil D. Haney during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David Kolmel)

Adm. Samuel Locklear III, commander of U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), commended Haney on his leadership during challenging times.

“Your strategic vision has set the stage for a new level of engagement, dialogue and consistence inside the PACOM area of responsibility,” said Locklear. “You have really done wonderful things in increasing the coordination and information sharing with our allies, to growing those critical partnerships, and on the Navy making sure the rebalance to the Asia-Pacific was real and realized.”

Locklear presented Haney with the Distinguished Service Medal. The award highlighted Haney’s efforts in achieving an unprecedented level of Fleet combat readiness, advancing regional partnerships, and leading the 2012 Rim of the Pacific, the largest multinational naval exercise in modern history.

“This award is more about the hard work and sacrifice of so many outstanding Pacific Fleet Sailors, civilians and family members,” said Haney, who moves on to lead the U.S. Strategic Command in Nebraska. “They are the ones who have earned it and who I sincerely thank for their hard work during my tour.”

After reading orders and assuming command, Adm. Harris thanked the men and women of the Pacific Fleet saying: “What you do on a daily basis is of fundamental importance to our nation’s defense — I’m proud to be your commander.” As the former assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Harris said he would continue the Pacific Fleet’s commitment to the rebalance “with our brothers and sisters” in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, Special Operations and Coast Guard.

Adm. Haney accepts his pennant from U.S. Pacific Fleet Master Chief Marco Ramirez during the change of command ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker)

Adm. Haney accepts his pennant from U.S. Pacific Fleet Master Chief Marco Ramirez during the change of command ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Barker)

“Our president and secretary of defense are clear,” said Harris. “As a nation, we will rebalance to the Pacific and we will work closely with our allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.”

Harris is the 34th naval officer to command the Pacific Fleet since it was established in February 1941 with headquarters at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1978, is a MIT Seminar 21 fellow, and has attended Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, and Oxford University for East Asia security.

As commander of Pacific Fleet, Harris is responsible for 100 million square miles ‘from Hollywood to Bollywood, from Antarctica to the Arctic Circle.’ Covering more than half the Earth’s surface, the Indo-Asia-Pacific region is vital to U.S. economic and security interests. Pacific Fleet maintains combat-ready and forward-deployed naval forces that consist of approximately 200 ships/submarines, 1,100 aircraft and 140,000 Sailors and civilians. Whether called to fight and win or to protect the peace, Pacific Fleet operates alongside allies, partners and multilateral organizations to ensure a stable and secure Indo-Asia-Pacific where all nations can prosper.

 

USS Chung-Hoon to Return to Hawaii Homeport Tomorrow

A couple of years ago I got to go out to sea with USS Chung-Hoon and I’m proud that they are returning to its homeport here in Hawaii:

Participating in the 2010 RIMPAC Exercises

Participating in the 2010 RIMPAC Exercises

The destroyer Chung-Hoon returns to its Hawaii homeport Tuesday after a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific.

The nearly 280 sailors on board participated in joint exercises with the Vietnamese, Japanese and Australian navies before heading home to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

“We operated forward and worked with our foreign partners in various multi-national exercises improving warfighter skills across a broad range of mission sets and further strengthening our bonds,” said Cmdr. Justin Orlich, the ship’s commanding officer. “Chung-Hoon sailors have accomplished a great deal this deployment and have much to be proud of in service to our nation.”

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Sailors participated in training and exchanges in search and rescue, medical, diving medicine, navigation and shipboard firefighting in April as part of the fourth annual Naval Engagement Activity with the Vietnam People’s Navy in Da Nang, Vietnam.

Gajeezus they let me hold one!

Gajeezus they let me hold one!

Over the summer, Chung-Hoon conducted multi-warfare exercises with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and Royal Australian Navy in Pacific Bond 2013 and with the Royal Australian Navy in Talisman Saber 2013.

Checking things out

Checking things out

“Chung Hoon performed marvelously throughout their deployment,” said Capt. Wallace Lovely, commodore of Destroyer Squadron 31. “This team answered the call for mission support on time, every time.”

The Commanding Officer gave me this coin after we had lunch on the USS Chung Hoon

The Commanding Officer gave me this coin after we had lunch on the USS Chung Hoon

The Chung-Hoon is named after the late World War II hero, Rear Adm. Gordon Paiea Chung-Hoon. He’s a Hawaaian native and a Navy Cross and Silver Star recipient for actions as commander of the destroyer Sigsbee from May 1944 to October 1945.

Senator Hirono Discusses Rebalance to the Pacific with Top Military and Defense Leaders

Senator Mazie K. Hirono, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, met this week with top military and defense leaders and discussed critical military issues including the rebalance to the Pacific, the harmful effects of sequestration, investments in sustainable energy technology and efforts to prevent and prosecute sexual assaults in the military. Hirono met separately with Admiral Harry Harris, who will take over as Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet in October, and Deborah Lee James, who will serve as Secretary of the Air Force if confirmed.

Hirono with Admiral Harry Harris.

Hirono with Admiral Harry Harris.

“I appreciated the opportunity to get to know Admiral Harris and Ms. James, two outstanding leaders who will play key roles in our national defense,” Hirono said. “Admiral Harris will do an excellent job taking over for Admiral Haney as Commander of the Pacific Fleet and has a deep knowledge of our military’s needs in the Pacific. Ms. James is an extremely knowledgeable and qualified candidate to serve as Secretary of the Air Force, and she would become only the second woman in history to fill that position. I wish her a quick confirmation.”

Hirono was also able to share with Harris and James some of her experiences meeting with Asia-Pacific leaders during her national defense-focused congressional delegation to China, Japan and South Korea.

Admiral Harry Harris is the highest-ranking Japanese-American naval officer. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Harris has served in every geographic combatant command region and was assigned in 2011 as the assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Hirono with Deborah Lee James.

Hirono with Deborah Lee James.

Deborah Lee James is President of the Technology and Engineering Sector at Science Applications International Corporation. Her professional experience includes a decade as a staff member on the House Armed Services Committee and serving as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Business Executives for National Security. James was nominated by President Obama in August and the Senate Armed Services Committee is expected to vote on her nomination next week.

Headquartered at Oahu’s Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, the U.S. Pacific Fleet plays a critical role in maintaining the security and economic interests of our nation and its allies in the Asia-Pacific Region. The fleet’s command covers 100 million square miles and is supported by approximately 200 marine vessels, nearly 1,100 aircraft and more than 140,000 sailors and civilians.

The U.S. Air Force has a major presence in Hawaii, with more than 9,500 active duty, National Guard and Reserve and civilian personnel.

Hawaii’s Last Frigate USS Reuben James to be Decommissioned Tomorrow

USS Reuben James (FFG 57), the last remaining guided-missile frigate homeported in Hawaii, will be decommissioned  tomorrow, July 18, after nearly thirty years of distinguished naval service.

USS Reuben James (FFG 57) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in May after completing its final deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tiarra Fulgham)

USS Reuben James (FFG 57) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in May after completing its final deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tiarra Fulgham)

The officers and crew of USS Reuben James will host nearly 100 friends, family, alumni and honored guests during a ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Among those expected to attend are 30 former crew members and their families, including five “plank-owners” (crew members who were assigned to the ship when it was commissioned) and six former commanding officers of the ship.

“This ceremony is an opportunity for us to say fair winds, farewell, and “a job well done‟ — not only to the crew today but also to the thousands of Sailors who served aboard Reuben James over the years,” said Capt. Chris Bushnell, Deputy Commodore of Destroyer Squadron 31. “It was my pleasure to thank “Fightin’ 57‟ and her crew for their fine service and hard work and also to present Reuben James the Ney Award last Thursday.”

Guest speaker at the decommissioning this Thursday will be retired Navy Captain Faris T. Farwell, former commanding officer of the ship, 1997-1999. CAPT Brent Smith, chief of staff for Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, will officiate.

The ship returned from deployment in early May after participating in a series of bilateral maritime exercises for Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) in the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility.

Capt. Dan Valascho said, “It was a privilege to have taken Reuben James on her last deployment forward this year. This proud warship has served the Navy for 27 years. I am grateful for this opportunity to thank all the Sailors and family members who have been part of the Reuben James ohana.”

With the departure of the Reuben James as the last remaining frigate homeported here, all of Navy‟s surface ships homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam will be guided-missile destroyers and cruisers.

Guided-missile frigates are multi-mission surface combatants, capable of Under-Sea Warfare (USW) and Surface Warfare (SW) missions. Reuben James has been assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 31 under Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, in Hawaii.

 

USS Jacksonville Returns to Pearl Harbor

Friends and families of the crew of USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) gathered at the submarine piers to welcome back the Los Angeles-class submarine as she returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a deployment to the Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf, June 18.

PEARL HARBOR (June 18, 2013) The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a deployment to the 7th Fleet and 5th Fleet areas of operation. Attack submarines are designed to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and special operation forces; carry out intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

PEARL HARBOR (June 18, 2013) The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a deployment to the 7th Fleet and 5th Fleet areas of operation. Attack submarines are designed to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and special operation forces; carry out intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

“I am incredibly proud of the crew of the warship Jacksonville. These Sailors have impressed me from day one, and I could not be more proud of their outstanding efforts,” said Cmdr. Richard Seif, Jacksonville’s commanding officer. “Their sustained forward presence in two different theaters contributed significantly to the Navy’s combat readiness and out nation’s security,” said Seif.

During the deployment, 31 Sailors earned their designation as qualified in submarines and now wear their dolphin warfare insignia. Along with this accomplishment, more than 60 Sailors also qualified in their senior watch stations.

Seif said despite half of the crew being their very first deployment, they are an experienced team of professional submariners and it’s really an honor to lead them.

Seif added that despite the challenges of deployment, the crew could not have done it without the tremendous strength, love and support of the Jacksonville families. “I’d like to especially thank our command Ombudsman, Kim Cowdrey and the Family Readiness Group for their outstanding support,” he said.

When the deployment was finally complete, the crew came home to a waiting crowd of smiling family and friends at the pier.

“It’s great to be back home. The Sailors and their families are all looking forward to a well deserved stand down,” said Sief. As for the families, many could not hold back their joy and relief.

“I am super proud of him. He has done a fantastic job. It’s been a long, tough deployment, but he’s home, and I’m happy,” said Jackie Combs, a Jacksonville spouse.

Commissioned in May 1981, Jacksonville is named for Jacksonville, Fla. Nicknamed “The Bold One,” she is a Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarine that is 360-feet long and displaces 6,900 tons. She can be fitted with Mk-48 torpedoes and harpoon missiles.

 

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to Activate Giant Voice Mass Warning System Tomorrow

“A training exercise at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH) will be conducted on May 2 between 8:00 am and 12:30 pm.

siren

During the exercise JBPHH will activate the Giant Voice Mass Warning System to provide notifications to the base population. All messages will have a tone and a voice message. The voice messages will start and end with the phrase, “exercise, exercise, exercise” – the base population can disregard these warnings.

There are no concerns for the JBPHH population and no actions are required to be taken. This exercise is designed to enhance the Navy’s emergency response capability and poses no hazards to the base or surrounding areas.”

 

Hawaii-Based Guided-Missile Cruiser USS Chosin to Depart for Western Pacific Deployment

Sailors aboard the Hawaii-based Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chosin (CG 65) will depart April 30 for a scheduled Western Pacific deployment.

In this file photo, USS Chosin (CG 65) fires a MK 45 5-inch gun during exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr.)

In this file photo, USS Chosin (CG 65) fires a MK 45 5-inch gun during exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr.)

While deployed, Chosin will conduct theater security operations with partner nations while providing deterrence, promoting peace and security, preserving freedom of the seas and providing humanitarian assistance/disaster response.

“A little over a year ago I realized a lifelong dream when I assumed command of this mighty warship and its exceptional crew,” said Chosin Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Kelly. “The crew of Chosin have prepared well for this deployment. We are trained, we are focused, and we are ready to operate forward.”

Kelly added, “We are privileged to be part of the Navy’s presence in the Asia-Pacific Region and to represent Surface Group MIDPAC and U.S. Pacific Fleet. We look forward to operating with our allies, partners and friends in the months ahead — wherever we are needed.”

Chosin is one of 11 surface ships of Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. USS Chosin is the first U.S. Navy warship named in commemoration of the First Marine Division’s heroism at the Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War. The ship’s motto is “invictus,” Latin for invincible or unconquered.

U.S. Navy guided-missile cruisers perform primarily multi-mission [Air Warfare (AW), Undersea Warfare (USW), Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) and Surface Warfare (SUW)] surface combatants capable of supporting carrier strike groups, amphibious forces, or of operating independently and as flagships of surface action groups.

Commander, U.S. Naval Survace Group Middle Pacific leads and manages the overall warfighting capability of the Surface Combatant Force homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), HI to achieve the highest levels of combat readiness; to coordinate with external organizations for products and services to directly support Surface Combatant Force mission readiness; and to support the Type Commanders and Numbered Fleet Commanders in the development of Surface Warfare requirements, policies, programs, standards, and business practices to meet operational readiness goals.

U.S. Third Fleet leads naval forces in the Eastern Pacific from the West Coast of North America to the international date line.

 

Stennis Carrier Strike Group Arrives in Hawaii

The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (JCSCSG) made its first stop in the U.S. at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam April 21 following an eight-month deployment to the 5th and 7th fleet areas of responsibility (AOR).

PEARL HARBOR (April 21, 2013) Sailors man the rails on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group, including Carrier Air Wing 9, Destroyer Squadron 21 and guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), is returning from an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jose L. Hernandez)

PEARL HARBOR (April 21, 2013) Sailors man the rails on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group, including Carrier Air Wing 9, Destroyer Squadron 21 and guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), is returning from an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jose L. Hernandez)

While deployed JCSCSG flew more than 11,500 sorties totaling 27,000 flight hours, and conducted community relations and service projects during port visits to Thailand, Malaysia, the Kingdom of Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, and the Republic of Singapore.

“We are excited to be back in the U.S. after a very successful deployment,” said Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker. “The strike group Sailors here did a fantastic job in every mission area. Through their efforts, we were able to provide extensive support to the coalition effort in Operation Enduring Freedom and to enhance our maritime relationships with regional partners throughout the 5th and 7th fleet operating areas.”

Hawaii also marks the homecoming for many Stennis Strike Group Sailors as they were able to visit with friends and family.

“This visit will be a nice reunion for my family and I to pick up where we all last left off and meet the new additions to our family,” said Cmdr. Chad Lee, from Kailua, Oahu. “This visit is special for all of us because we will all be visiting my 95 year old great grandmother.”

The JCSCSG, consisting of Stennis, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21, and guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), is returning from an eight month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 7th AORs.

 

USS Chung-Hoon to Deploy to Western Pacific

The guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) will depart Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam April 2 for an independent deployment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

The ship’s departure, originally planned for Feb. 28, was deferred to better refine sequestration planning and execution.

Commanded by Cmdr. Justin Orlich, the ship and its crew of nearly 280 Sailors will conduct integrated operations in conjunction with allies and partners.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

“Our team is looking forward to executing the mission,” Orlich said. “This is why we train. This is why we remain ready. This is what we do: operate forward.”

The Commanding Officer gave me this coin after we had lunch on the USS Chung Hoon

The Commanding Officer gave me this coin after we had lunch on the USS Chung Hoon

The ship’s motto is, “Imua e na Koa Kai” which translates to “Go Forward Sea Warriors.” As part of Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific and Destroyer Squadron 31, Chung-Hoon operates forward, maintaining the highest warfighting readiness to preserve the freedom of vital sea lanes.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Chung-Hoon is a guided-missile destroyer that is a multi-mission anti-air warfare, anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare surface combatant — an important component of the Navy’s rebalancing of assets and forces to the Pacific.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

USS Chung-Hoon is named in honor of native Hawaiian Rear Adm. Gordon Pai’ea Chung-Hoon, recipient of the Navy Cross and Silver Star in World War II for conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism as commanding officer of USS Sigsbee (DD 502) from May 1944 to October 1945.

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Photo from when I went to sea on the USS Chung-Hoon

Guided-missile destroyers are multi-mission anti-air warfare, anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare surface combatants, an important component of the Navy’s rebalancing of assets and forces to the Pacific.

 

Men Jump From C-17 Globemaster in Hawaii

Maj. Aaron Lawson jumps from a C-17 Globemaster III Feb. 26, 2013, near Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam-Hawaii. The jump was filmed by veteran freefall cameraman and skydiver cinematographer, Tom Sanders, and will be used in a scene on an upcoming episode of the television show “Hawaii Five-0.”

C17 Skydiver

Lawson was given the opportunity to serve as a stunt double for actor Alex O’Loughlin, who plays Steve McGarrett on the show and will be featured alongside Marine Corps Staff Sgt. John Phillips, SOCPAC jumper and parachute rigger, performing the freefall jump.

Maj. Aaron Lawson opens his parachute after performing a freefall jump from a C-17 Globemaster III near Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam-Hawaii, Feb. 26, 2013. (Photo by Tom Sanders)

Maj. Aaron Lawson opens his parachute after performing a freefall jump from a C-17 Globemaster III near Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam-Hawaii, Feb. 26, 2013. (Photo by Tom Sanders)

Even though this was Sanders’ first jump from a C-17, he’s still had the opportunity to jump with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Hugh Shelton and former President George Bush.

Members of the “Hawaii Five-0″ production crew film the landing of Special Operations Command, Pacific freefall jumpers. (Photo by Tom Sanders)

Members of the “Hawaii Five-0″ production crew film the landing of Special Operations Command, Pacific freefall jumpers. (Photo by Tom Sanders)

This episode will air April 15 on CBS at 10PM EST. Lawson is a Special Operations Command, Pacific jumper and special tactics officer. (Photo/Tom Sanders)

Navy Submarine USS Olympia Returns to Pearl Harbor

Friends and families of the crew from USS Olympia (SSN 717) gathered at the submarine piers to welcome back the Los Angeles-class submarine as she returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a seven-month deployment to the Western Pacific region, March 4.

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (March 4, 2013) The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) approaches the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam as she returns from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. Attack submarines are designed to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and Special Operation Forces; carry out Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (March 4, 2013) The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) approaches the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam as she returns from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. Attack submarines are designed to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and Special Operation Forces; carry out Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

“Olympia accomplished national tasking, theater tasking, and security cooperation events throughout the 7th Fleet area, and enhanced continued relations with our allies overseas,” said Cmdr. Michael J. Boone, Olympia’s commanding officer.

Boone said the submarine crew worked around the clock applying months of preparations and workups into mission accomplishment. The range of the missions offered a broad aspect for training and development, creating experienced Sailors across all mission areas.

“The hard work and determination from the crew of Olympia these past seven months developed a camaraderie that is second to none. We are returning to Pearl Harbor as a more experienced and capable unit,” said Boone.

During the deployment, two officers and 21 enlisted Sailors earned their designation as qualified in submarines and now wear their dolphin warfare insignia.

Boone added the crew was able to get time off to experience the diverse cultures in Yokosuka, Japan; Subic Bay, Philippines; Guam, and Singapore. While in a few of these foreign ports, foreign dignitaries and ambassadors toured the submarine.

When the deployment was finally complete, the crew came home to a waiting crowd of smiling family and friends at the pier.

“I am estatic, it’s been such a long time! The best thing is just to hold my husband and have him home.” said Beecee Hall, an Olympia spouse.

USS Olympia is the second ship named after Olympia, Wash. Commissioned Nov. 17, 1984, Olympia is the 29th ship of the Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarines. The submarine is 362-feet long, displaces 6,900 tons and can be armed with sophisticated Mark-48 torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles.

 

New Signs Promote Pearl Harbor Heritage

New historical signs known as wayside exhibits are being installed this week at various spots around Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to provide more information to inquiring visitors about historically significant sites on base.

Pearl Harbor Sign

Hawaii (Feb. 27, 2013) Builder 2nd Class Reynaldo Castro, left, and Utilitiesman 2nd Class Jeremy Orndoff, from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Self Help, install a series of wayside exhibits at USS Parche Submarine Memorial Park. The wayside exhibits enhance the landscape by providing visitors with more thorough descriptions of the landmarks and incorporating photos with information at historic sites around Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

The project took off after several years of planning by Navy Region Hawaii, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

“The idea is that when you see the wayside exhibits, it puts history in context. There’s nothing like a photograph to give one a better description of what they are looking at,” said Navy Region Hawaii Historian Jim Neuman.

There will be a total of 12 exhibits, to include locations around the former Pearl Harbor Submarine base: Lockwood Hall, the Submarine Base Chapel, Sharkey Theatre and the USS Parche Submarine Memorial Park.

Some of the exhibits include multiple signs that provide photos, historical facts and personnel profiles.

“It’s great! I think visitors will appreciate it. It shows that we understand that we have history, that we care about our history, and that we want to preserve that history,” added Neuman.

Neuman went on to say that the signs are synchronized with the National Park Service in design so visitors can see a more uniform presentation of information throughout the Pearl Harbor area.

“It’s definitely very informative when we do work like this. We learn what these various ship and submarine parts are doing here. With the pictures, it will help people understand why they put this here, why the propeller is over there, and what the memorial is all about,” said Builder 2nd Class Reynaldo Castro of the NAVFAC Self Help Seabees.

US Navy Submarine USS Buffalo Arrives in New Home Port – Pearl Harbor

On a clear sunny day in Pearl Harbor, with performers from the Polynesian Cultural Center dancing, the Pacific Fleet Band playing tunes, and family and friends with leis in their hands, USS Buffalo (SSN 715) arrived at her new homeport.

USS Buffalo (SSN 715) arrives at her new homeport, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Jan. 18. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

USS Buffalo (SSN 715) arrives at her new homeport, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Jan. 18. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

The Jan. 18 arrival of the Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam marked the near completion of a homeport shift from Commander, Submarine Squadron 15 in Guam.

Buffalo, nicknamed Silent Thunder, departed Guam Jan. 11. Upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor, she will be assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 1.

“My crew and I couldn’t be more excited about Buffalo’s change of homeport to Pearl Harbor!,” said Cmdr. Richard Seif, commanding officer of Buffalo. “My Sailors and families have heard many so many great things about the islands, and we are looking forward to experiencing Hawaii’s world famous “spirit of aloha.”

With only two families left to move, their arrival in Hawaii in the next few weeks will complete the move from Guam.

Seif said Buffalo’s change of homeport has been a real team effort that began almost a year ago. Buffalo’s Sailors had a lot of great lessons learned from the USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705) and USS Houston (SSN 713) who made the move to Hawaii from Guam previously. He said he can’t say enough about the support he and his crew have received from Commander Submarine Squadron 1, Naval Submarine Support Command, the housing office, and the personnel support detachment staffs from Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, because they made the move easy for crew.

“It was a little hard to move here at first, but the people are very kind, so it was OK,” said Paige Suh, a Buffalo spouse.

For Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Kekoa Ulep, Hawaii is home. The Hawaiian native has been smiling continuously since the crew got underway from Guam, and entertained the crew with his ukulele. Ulep is very excited to see his family and go back to his church.

“It feels great to be here, I really miss my ohana or “family” and it’s a very overwhelming feeling, I love it,” said Ulep.

USS Buffalo is the second ship to be named after Buffalo, N.Y., and is built to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and Special Operation Forces; carry out Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare.

 

USS Greeneville Returns to Pearl Harbor

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region, Dec. 14.

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) moors to the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 14 as she returns from a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) moors to the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 14 as she returns from a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

“Greeneville is proud to return to Pearl Harbor after an extremely successful six month deployment having not only achieved the national goals assigned to her, but also having served as ambassadors of American goodwill in three countries, “said Cmdr. Martin Muckian, Greeneville’s commanding officer.

The Los Angeles-class submarine completed a variety of operations and several training exercises throughout the deployment, contributing to the nation’s strategic posture in the region. Greeneville also strengthened relationships between the United States and the Republic of Korea during a multinational exercise with the Korean Naval Forces.

With about 60 percent of the crew making their first Western Pacific deployment, the crew had the opportunity for invaluable training and unique experiences. During the deployment, 26 enlisted Sailors became submarine qualified and are now entitled to wear the enlisted submarine warfare insignia. A large number of the crew also completed advanced qualifications, including Engineering Watch Supervisor, Diving Officer of the Watch, and Chief of the Watch. These qualifications will ensure that Greeneville’s performance will remain strong following deployment.

“For many of the crew this will be one of the few times in their life to experience foreign cultures first hand,” said Master Chief Electronics Technician Marcus Hensley, Greeneville’s chief of the boat.

With more than 34,000 nautical miles steamed and multiple challenging operations completed, the crew had the opportunity to enjoy several ports visits including Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, Saipan and Singapore, during their six month months away from Pearl Harbor. While in Singapore, the Sailors assisted the Riding for the Disabled Association, a non-profit organization that offers free horse rides to those with disabilities. The Sailors helped clean and performed maintenance on the association’s facilities.

Stay Safe USS Cheyenne – Submarine Leaves Pearl Harbor With My Heart Still On Board

A year ago yesterday, I had the opportunity to get a private tour of the Fast-Attack Submarine the USS Cheyenne (SSN 773), and today I’m saddened to be learning that it is leaving Hawaii for a six-month deployment.

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii – Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 13 for a scheduled six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region.

Commander Rogeness and I infront of the USS Cheyenne Submarin

Commander Rogeness and I infront of the USS Cheyenne Submarine

Cheyenne’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Noel J. Gonzalez, commented the crew is eager and excited to get underway.

“I am extremely happy with the crew’s enthusiasm, eagerness, and motivation to accomplish our tasking,” said Gonzalez.

At the helm of the USS Cheyenne

At the helm of the USS Cheyenne

Gonzalez said the crew has anxiously waited for the day to deploy after having spent months preparing and training for the missions they will soon undertake. From different weather patterns to deployed operational tasking, Cheyenne will face many challenges during deployment that are not normally encountered in the local operating area.

For many on the crew, including Electronics Technician 3rd Class Sean Michael Dziuvenis, this will be a first deployment.

“It’s going to be a long time away from homeport, not talking to my family and friends, but I’m looking forward to the port visits and seeing the world,” said Dziuvenis.

Inside the sub

Inside the sub

Along with accomplishing the mission, the deployment will provide an opportunity to gain experience for many on the crew to include watchstanding, and submarine qualifications.

“This is without a doubt the best-trained crew in the Pacific Fleet and they are ready to complete any mission,” said Cheyenne’s Command Master Chief Michael Hinkle.

In the Sioux language, Cheyenne means "aliens" or "people of foreign toungue".  The Sioux Indiangs gave the name "Cheyenne" to the Indian tribe that roamed the plains in this region.  The crew of the USS Cheyenne earned the Commander, Submarine Squadron SEVEN Battle Efficiency "E" Award in 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007.

In the Sioux language, Cheyenne means “aliens” or “people of foreign toungue”. The Sioux Indiangs gave the name “Cheyenne” to the Indian tribe that roamed the plains in this region. The crew of the USS Cheyenne earned the Commander, Submarine Squadron SEVEN Battle Efficiency “E” Award in 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007.

Commissioned September 1996, USS Cheyenne is the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Cheyenne, Wyoming, and is one of the most capable attack submarines in the world. She can launch Harpoon and Tomahawk missiles as well as Mark-48 torpedoes.

 

USS Hawaii Returns to Pearl Harbor

Friends and families of the crew from the USS Hawaii (SSN 776) gathered at the submarine piers to welcome back the Virginia-class submarine as she returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region, Nov. 20.

Commander Rogeness of the USS CHEYENNE and I in front of the USS Cheyenne Submarine when I got to tour the sub in Pearl Harbor

“It was an honor and privilege to sail with these warriors, ambassadors and Sailors, taking the war canoe on her second Western Pacific deployment, “said Cmdr. Stephan G. Mack, USS Hawaii commanding officer. “We are very proud of them for their accomplishments.”

During the deployment, Hawaii accomplished tasking in support of theatre and national interests and participated in two combined anti-submarine warfare exercises.

Hawaii also conducted several port visits that strengthened relationships with key regional allies, including Japan, South Korea, and the Philippines throughout her six months away from Pearl Harbor. While in the foreign ports, the crew experienced different cultures and participated in social events with their host ships.

Mack said the crew of 137 performed flawlessly in all respects in the six month deployment. They were also highly successful in the area of professional development with 24 Sailors having earned their submarine qualification or “Dolphins” and many returning to homeport advanced to the next higher pay grade.

“Deployment exposed all Hawaii Sailors to the dynamic operational environment of the Western Pacific, enabling all hands to achieve more senior qualification and gain valuable at sea experience,” said Mack. “The experience we gained operating Hawaii for six months forward-deployed, away from shore-based support, demonstrates our capability for extended operations, our commitment to distant friends, and the flexibility, endurance, and mobility of these mighty warships.”

For 57 of the 137 Sailors on board, this was their first deployment experience according to Mack. Sonar Technician Submarines Seaman Craig Parazak describes the deployment as eye opening and something that he has a new found respect for.

“It was the hardest work that I have ever had to do, but very rewarding,” said Parazak.

Mack said the submarine’s return home from deployment back to family and friends was made even better by their return to the beautiful island of Hawaii.

“There is nothing better than being on the Hawaii in Hawaii,” said Mack.

Hawaii is the first commissioned vessel of its name. The submarine was named to recognize the tremendous support the Navy has enjoyed from the people and state of Hawaii, and in honor of the rich heritage of submarines in the Pacific.

Video: Air Force’s F-22 Raptors Achieve Initial Operational Capability (IOC) Status

F-22’s launch from Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam.

The Hawaii Air National Guard (HIANG) and U.S. Air Force declare Initial Operational Capability (IOC) of Hawaii – Based F-22 aircraft.

Footage from TSgt Andrew Jackson, 154th Wing Public Affairs, Hawaii Air National Guard

The Hawaii Air National Guard’s 199th Fighter Squadron and the Active duty Air Forces’ 19th Fighter Squadron have achieved Initial Operational Capability (IOC) status.

The IOC announcement comes at the end of a three-day exercise that clearly demonstrates the units’ ability to fly and maintain the world’s most advanced fighter aircraft for any contingency operations.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/1pkHft88jWY]

The F-22 is capable of both air-to-air, as well as air-to-ground combat and is the Air Force’s Primary air superiority fighter providing unmatched capabilities for air supremacy and homeland defense.

Navy in Hawaii Wins Top Prize for Energy

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam was the big winner today in a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. recognizing commands that are leading the way in energy security.

CAPT Jeff James, Joint Base Commander, and teams from Hawaii were on hand to receive the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Energy and Water Management Award.

U.S. Navy courtesy photo

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus recognized select commands for leading the Department of the Navy in reducing energy and water consumption, increasing use of renewable energy sources and constructing sustainable facilities, all while maintaining mission readiness.

“These awards demonstrate the progress that we have made in the last three and a half years to change the way we think about and the way we produce and use energy,” said Mabus. “We are working towards these energy goals to help us become a more effective military force to help us accomplish the mission that the nation gives us.”

Navy leaders have shown how renewable energy saves lives on the battlefield and provides independence from foreign sources of energy.

Hawaii Leads

As SECNAV Platinum Command Award winner, the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam is authorized to fly the SECNAV Energy Flag for one year. There is also a cash award of $45,000.

The USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60) was honored with Platinum level status for afloat commands and will receive a $5,000 award.
Also earning recognition were the Pacific Missile Range Facility, receiving Gold level of achievement, and the USS Hopper (DDG 70), awarded Blue level of achievement.

WASHINGTON (Oct. 3, 2012) Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks at the Secretary of the Navy Energy and Water Management Awards ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial. The awards recognize Navy and Marine Corps installations, ships and squadrons for their notable progress toward the Department of the Navy’s goals of reducing energy and water consumption, increasing the use of renewable energy, and constructing sustainable facilities. (U.S. navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brett Cote/ Released)

“Congratulations to everyone – past and present, ashore and afloat – who earned this tremendous recognition,” said Rear Adm. Frank Ponds, commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. Pearl Harbor-Hickam, USS Paul Hamilton, PMRF and USS Hopper are commended for strong leadership, commitment and advocacy for energy and water management. I am extremely proud that the honors we received recognize our ‘one team’ – both the installations and the waterfront.”

Among the accomplishments leading to JBPHH winning the 2012 SECNAV Energy and Water Management Award include reducing energy consumption by 18 percent in the first year of FOC [full operational capability], constructing photovoltaic systems at five JBPHH facilities and at the Pacific Missile Range, and conducting more than $6.5M in energy and water efficiency projects in fiscal year 2011.

The JBPHH energy team is comprised of Katie Ramirez and Amy Nishijima, installation energy managers, who are also part of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Hawaii, as well as building energy monitors who conduct weekly audits of energy usage.
“This is a truly a team award, and represents the collective efforts of every command and individual across the entire joint base,” said Capt. Jeffrey James, commander of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

“The sheer size and diversity of this base – ranging from SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team One on the Pearl City Peninsula to the Hawaii Air National Guard on Hickam to the Naval Communications/Telecommunications Area Master Station at Wahiawa Annex, and everything in-between-make this recognition all the more meaningful,” he said.

“I couldn’t be prouder to be associated with the outstanding military service members, DoD civilians and families residing onboard JBPHH. It is their commitment and willingness to go the extra mile that make achievements like this possible. As you drive by the flagpole at the JBPHH HQ building and see the SECNAV Energy Award flag proudly waving in the warm trade winds, you can rightly feel a sense of satisfaction knowing that you helped put it there,” James said.

Achievements Recognized

The DoN is cultivating a culture of energy efficiency on shore and at sea resulting in enhanced energy readiness and innovation. DoN is a widely recognized leader in renewable energy production. Equivalent of 19 percent of DoN shore electricity consumption comes from alternative sources.

Eight Navy and Marine Corps commands were recognized for exemplary energy and water savings which resulted in combined energy savings in 2011 of more than 418,500 million British thermal units (MBtu), enough energy for more than 4,144 homes for an entire year. The commands brought new renewable energy systems on line that produce 48,700 MBtu per year, equal to the energy requirements of 482 homes per year. Water savings were more than 37.5 million gallons, equivalent to 57 Olympic-size swimming pools. Cost avoidance in 2011 topped more than $16.7 million.

Navy commands undergo a rigorous evaluation of their overall energy and water management performance and are ranked according to a system of SECNAV award winners, then platinum, gold or blue level of achievement. Ten platinum, 51 gold and 36 blue commands were also recognized during the ceremony.

Mabus emphasized DoN’s aggressive energy and water consumption goals laid out three years ago. These five goals strengthen the strategic, tactical and operational capabilities of the Navy and Marine Corps while enhancing environmental stewardship:

The DoN’s five energy goals are:

.    Increase Alternative Energy Use DoN-Wide: By 2020, 50 percent of total DoN energy consumption will come from alternative sources;
.    Sail the “Great Green Fleet”: DoN demonstrated a Green Strike Group in local operations in 2012 and will sail it by 2016;
.    Reduce Non-Tactical Petroleum Use: By 2015; DoN will reduce petroleum use in the commercial vehicle fleet by 50 percent;
.    Energy Ashore: By 2020, DoN will produce at least 50 percent of shore-based energy requirements from alternative sources; 50 percent of DoN installations will be net-zero; and
.    Energy Efficient Acquisition: Evaluation of energy factors will be mandatory when awarding contracts for systems and buildings.

“We have energy goals that we want to achieve and because of the courage, bold actions and innovations of our winners today, we will achieve these goals,” said Mabus. “We are on the path to create a new energy future that will increase the security of this country because that is what the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps have always done.”

For more news on U.S. Department of the Navy Energy, visit http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil.

Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group to Visit Hawaii

In 2010 I got to land on the USS Ronald Reagan Aircraft Carrier and then got catapulted off.  I just heard that the USS Carl Vinson Aircraft Carrier will be visiting Hawaii starting tomorrow:

In this file photo, aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam with Sailors’ friends and families aboard for a ‘Tiger Cruise’ in June 2011. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans)

[Pearl Harbor, Hawaii] Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, including aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), is scheduled to arrive at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam May 15 for a port visit.

CSG 1, led by Rear Adm. T.K. Shannon, also consists of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 1, guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97), guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 embarked aboard Carl Vinson.

The ships of the CSG are currently transiting to their homeport of San Diego following a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific and Middle East areas supporting maritime theater security operations with the U.S. 7th and 5th Fleets.

“The dedication demonstrated by every Sailor up and down the chain of command was the key factor in accomplishing every mission objective for our time in the 5th and 7th Fleets,” said Carl Vinson Commanding Officer Capt. Kent D. Whalen. “With our return to 3rd Fleet, our focus may have changed but our mission-ready mindset continues.”

Adm. Cecil Haney Assumes Command of U.S. Pacific Fleet

Adm. Cecil D. Haney, former deputy of the U.S. Strategic Command, relieved Adm. Patrick M. Walsh as commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet during a change of command ceremony onboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Jan. 20.

PEARL HARBOR (Jan. 20,2012) Adm. Patrick M. Walsh, right, returns the salute of Adm. Cecil Haney, left, as Haney relieves Walsh as U.S. Pacific Fleet commander during a traditional change of command ceremony on the Pearl Harbor waterfront. Looking on are Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, second from left, and Adm. Robert Willard, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, second from right. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David Kolmel / Released)

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert presided over the ceremony and praised Walsh for his service in the Navy and the impact his leadership had on the command.

“He’s had a marvelous career. He knows what it means to take care of a family, he knows what it means to take care of a command, and he’s encouraged his staff to do the same,” said Greenert to a crowd of almost 900 attendees. “He’s (Walsh) all about being ready, he’s harnessed that Pacific Fleet teamwork, the talent and resources…”

More Here:  Adm. Cecil Haney Assumes Command of U.S. Pacific Fleet