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Hokulea Crosses Paths With The World’s Largest Viking Ship

During Hokulea’s historic sail on the Erie Canal this week, the canoe crossed paths with the Draken Harald Harfagre, a modern day Viking ship from Norway on a similar mission of connecting the ancient ways of sailing with modern-day exploration. One from Hawaii and the other from Norway, both sailing vessels are connecting their crews with their past by tracing the ocean routes and voyaging traditions of their ancestors.

drakkenUpon arrival at New York’s Sylvan Beach, located on the east shore of Oneida Lake adjacent to the Erie Canal, on Wednesday, Hokulea tied up bow-to-bow with Draken Harald Harfagre. Hokulea crew members welcomed the Draken crew on board the traditional Polynesian canoe. They also received the opportunity to board the 114 feet long, 80-ton ship with a 3,200 square foot sail from Norway crafted from oak.

The two crews exchanged gifts as a gesture of respect and friendship. Kalepa Baybayan, captain of Hokulea’s leg 23 of the Worldwide Voyage, presented Draken Captain Bjorn Ahlander with a traditional Hawaiian feather standard or kahili, and the Hokulea crew members received a book from the Draken Harald Harfagre crew that contained photos of the majestic vessel sailing alongside icebergs and through snow storms.

drakken2“The mission was to prove that it is possible to sail the ocean with a Viking ship. We knew that before, because we got findings from (Viking explorer) Leif Eriksson around year 1000 in North America, many years before Christopher Columbus found India,” said Ahlander of the Draken Harald Harfagre as he described the start of his crew’s journey. “The mission was to prove that it was possible to go the historic voyage from Norway to Iceland, Iceland to Greenland, Greenland to Newfoundland, and we did it,” Ahlander stated.
drakken3“A lot of people do not move far from where they come from, and I think that’s a pity because people all over the world are different, we can learn so much from each other,” said Erik Rolfmoller, deckhand for the Draken Harald Harfagre. “The exploration and the development you go through personally when you go exploring is very important,” Rolfmoller added.

Named after Harald Harfagre, the king who unified Norway into one kingdom, the dragon ship was constructed in the town of Haugesund in Western Norway in March of 2010. In 2012, Draken Harald Harfagre launched for the first time on trial sails in the waters along the Norwegian coastline. Draken Harald Harfagre made her first lengthy roundtrip ocean voyage from Haugesund, Norway, to Liverpool, England in the summer of 2014. In late April of this year, the world’s largest viking ship built in modern times left Norway to sail off for a challenging voyage across the North Atlantic Ocean.

drakken4Both crews from the Viking ship and Polynesian canoe connected on their shared purpose of making the ancient ways of sailing still highly relevant in today’s modern world, by retracing and honoring the sea routes of their ancestors and perpetuating the spirit of exploration. Additionally, Hokulea crew shared with the Draken crew the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage’s mission of caring for Island Earth, and finding stories of hope from the places and people they encounter along their journey.

Hokulea is currently docked in Oswego, NY on Lake Ontario and will be heading for Ontario, Canada next.

Hokulea Begins Travel to North American Great Lakes Using Complex Waterway Lock System

Precision, timing and patience: these meticulous elements are crucial to the success of Hokulea’s most current leg of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, as the canoe and her crew are set to encounter lock after lock on their first-time sail to the Great Lakes of North America. A lock is a complex waterway system used for raising and lowering watercraft between bodies of water of different levels on rivers and waterways.

locks4The traditional voyaging canoe from Hawaii left Waterford, New York early this morning and docked at Riverlink Marina in Amsterdam, New York at around 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Crew members are now prepped to sail the Erie Canal locks and bridges, taking the Oswego detour to pass through 30 locks to reach Lake Ontario.

locksThe canoe first encountered the waterway lock system in March this year during her Florida sail. However, this current series of locks is the most extensive lock system that the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage has experienced, and the crew will take this time to learn the more intricate details about the physics of the lock system. On this leg of the voyage, the canoe has been elevated by the waterway locks by a collective total of 250 feet.

locks2The Hokulea crew plans to re-start sailing tomorrow morning at 7:30 a.m. ET. After completing the first ten 10 locks today, they are aiming to complete Locks 11-18, with Lock 17 having the highest water lift of 40 feet.

locks3This current leg will bring Hokulea the furthest north that she will travel on the Worldwide Voyage.

Hokulea Heading to the Great Lakes

Hokulea departed Jersey City, New Jersey this morning to embark on a new journey that will take the iconic canoe to the Great Lakes for the first time in history. After sailing through New York via the Hudson River, Hokulea is slated to sail through the fresh water systems of the Erie Canal, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence.

great lakesThe canoe will reach the farthest point north of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage when she arrives in Sorel, Canada in mid-September and is expected to return to New Jersey by October (weather-permitting).

Great Lakes1Leg 23 of the the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage gives the Hokulea crew an opportunity to learn about Canada’s parks, lakes, rivers and wetlands and what the country is doing to protect and conserve these resources. Canada has one fifth of the world’s freshwater.

great lakes2Another first in her sailing history, the traditional sailing vessel will travel through Canada’s locks and waterways exploring new territory for the canoe and her experienced crew. Hokulea’s crew will sail up New York’s Hudson River to the Erie Canal to reach Lake Ontario and plans to travel all the way to the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec to access Montreal. The canoe is expected to journey through 52 locks and under 160 bridges, crossing fresh water systems throughout inland Canada.

great lakes3“Exploration is core to what we do, which is why we are sailing Hokulea to waters where we never imagined she could go,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging society and pwo (master) navigator. “Because of Canada’s lock system and other complexities, the voyaging team has spent months preparing for this leg by researching and studying these waterways,” he added.

great lakes4

Hokulea Arrives in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

Hokulea, Hawaii’s iconic traditional canoe, took the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage north of the United States as it arrived at Canada’s Port of Yarmouth early this morning.

nova scotia

Crew members were welcomed by the Nova Scotia community, dignitaries and members of the Mi’kmaw (pronounced “Meeg Maw”) Nation on the Yarmouth dock, some who attended the occasion in traditional garb. The Mi’kmaw are part of the Wabanaki that Hokulea and her crew honored during the voyage’s recent Portsmouth and Mt. Desert stops.

nova scotia headsThe celebratory arrival ceremony featured cultural dances and the rhythmic beating of drums. Feathers were presented by a representative of the Mi’kmaw to each Hokulea crew member as a symbol of peace and unity.

nova scotia exchangeCanadian legislators were also in attendance: the Honourable Zach Churchill, Yarmouth Mayor Pam Mood, Warden Murray Goodwin from the Municipality of Yarmouth, and Warden Aldric d’Entremont from the Municipality of Argyle.

“This makes me believe that we’re more alike than we’re different. When we come here and you tell us to come to your place, and thank us for being here, and for being happy – that’s aloha,” said Nainoa Thompson, pwo (master) navigator and president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, during the arrival ceremony. “The Worldwide Voyage is trying to take this little canoe and aloha around the world, and we came to Yarmouth for that purpose,” he added.

nova scotia nainoaChief Deborah Robinson of the Acadia First Nations (Mi’kmaw Nation) also spoke at the event. “The Mi’kmaw as part of the indigenous community of Canada, has always struggled and continue to strive to protect Mother Earth and all the natural resources for the future. The preservation of our environment and conservation of the resource is of utmost importance to us as the Mi’kmaw. We all have the same goal – in ensuring a future for our children, and for children for generations to come.”

nova scotia indianWhile in Canada, Hokulea crew members hope to learn more about cultural and environmental sustainability practices from the Bay of Fundy and the Southwest Nova Biosphere Reserve-a UNESCO-designated area that serves as a model for demonstrating a balanced relationship between humans and the environment.

nova scotia gathering

The Hokulea crew hopes to document and share what they learn from the visit with students in classrooms throughout Hawaii. They will stay for about six days to engage with the area’s First Nations, learn about Nova Scotia’s natural resources and conservation efforts and offer canoe tours to the community.

Canada to Welcome Hokulea… Eh!

The crew of Hokulea is preparing to sail Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe and deliver her Malama Honua message to Canada. Currently moored in Mt. Desert, Maine, the canoe is scheduled to depart for Yarmouth in Nova Scotia, Canada on Sunday, July 31. The sail to Canada will be the farthest point north that the legendary voyaging canoe has ventured.

Hokulea Canada

“We want to touch a new country – we want to welcome (Canada) into the circle of places that the canoe has visited,” said Kalepa Baybayan, pwo (master) navigator.  “We want to capture their stories, and then we’ll turn around, start hitting south and back into more tropical climates – back into the Pacific,” he added.

On their northbound sail to Canada, Hokulea crew members hope to learn more about cultural and environmental sustainability practices from the Bay of Fundy and the Southwest Nova Biosphere-a UNESCO-designated area that serves as a model for demonstrating a balanced relationship between humans and the biosphere.

The Bay of Fundy is known for the greatest tidal shifts on the planet. Within a 12-hour period, more water flows in and out of the bay than a 24-hour flow of all the rivers around the world. More importantly, it is a marine zone where a wide variety of marine species and endangered whales congregate each year. Conservation efforts and protection of the Bay of Fundy and the Southwest Nova Biosphere are vital to the Earth’s ecosystem. The Hokulea crew’s goal is to document and share what they learn from the visit with students in classrooms throughout Hawaii.

Hokulea is scheduled to arrive in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on July 31, and will stay for about six days to engage with the area’s First Nations, learn about Nova Scotia’s natural resources and conservation efforts and offer canoe tours to the community.

Hokulea Departs Salem, MA and Arrives in Portsmouth, NH

Legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea left Salem, Massachusetts on Saturday morning after spending two days engaging with the community. During the stop, the crew was given a behind-the-scenes tour of the Peabody Essex Museum’s Oceanic Arts and Culture Gallery, which is currently closed to the public due to renovations.

Visitors come to check out Hōkūleʻa in Salem.

Visitors come to check out Hōkūleʻa in Salem.

This was a significant visit for the crew because of the museum’s collection of 20,000 objects from more than 36 island groups in Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia. Among them are 5,000 Hawaiian objects that form one of the most important collections of its kind outside of Hawaii.

Curator Karen Kramer welcomes the crew into the storage facility where the crew was able to experience traditional Hawaiian artifacts.

Curator Karen Kramer welcomes the crew into the storage facility where the crew was able to experience traditional Hawaiian artifacts.

Part of the collection is one of the three statue images of Hawaiian god Kukailimoku. Only two other large carved images of Kukailimoku have survived: one at the British Museum and the other at the Bishop Museum. The three Ku images were brought together for the first time in more than 150 years for a groundbreaking exhibit at Bishop Museum in 2010.

Curator Karen Kramer explains a little about the Hawaiian artifacts in their collection.

Curator Karen Kramer explains a little about the Hawaiian artifacts in their collection.

Hokulea departed Salem on Saturday at about 6:30 a.m. (12:30 a.m. HST) for Portsmouth, NH where the crew arrived at about 2:00 p.m. and were greeted by three members of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook-Abenaki People, led by Chief Paul Pouliot. The voyaging canoe is scheduled to depart Portsmouth on Tuesday, July 19, for Portland, Maine.

Hokulea Arrives in Salem, Massachusetts

Hokulea, the legendary voyaging canoe from Hawaii, arrived in Salem before noon on Thursday, July 14. The canoe and her crew left Boston at around 6:30 a.m., where they spent four days interacting with local Native American communities, schools and maritime groups.

Salem3Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll, Salem Maritime National Historic Site Superintendent Paul DuPrey, and representatives from the Salem community welcomed Hokulea with a ceremony at Salem’s Central Wharf. The engagement highlighted the connection between Salem’s maritime community and Polynesian seafaring history.

“It gives me great pleasure to welcome Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe to Salem’s historic waterfront. We’re proud to be one of your global voyage ports in the midst of your multi-year circumnavigation of the globe to raise awareness of Polynesian maritime culture and ocean conservation,” said Driscoll. “Amazing, this vessel, and the trip that you’ve made. Courageous, I should say,” added Driscoll. During the arrival ceremony, the mayor presented the Hokulea crew with the official city seal.

During their stay at Salem, the crew plans to hold environmental and cultural education programs and offer canoe tours to the public. The public is encouraged to follow the Salem Maritime NHS event page and Hokulea on Facebook for scheduling updates and changes.

Pending weather and safety issues, Hokulea will be departing for Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Saturday morning. The Worldwide Voyage will continue to spread its Malama Honua message over the summer as it sails up the east coast to Maine.

Hokulea Arrives in Boston

Legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea is continuing to visit communities in the New England area. The canoe was greeted by representatives from the Massachusett Tribe and a large crowd of residents when she arrived in Boston at Fan Pier on Saturday at 5:00 p.m. EST (11:00 a.m. HST). The Boston welcome ceremony also included performances by a Boston hula halau, Samoan dancers and Native American dancers and drummers.

Hokulea Boston 2

Hokulea is scheduled to stay in Boston for four days during which the crew will hold public canoe tours, meet with local Native American communities, schools and maritime groups. Today, the public will have an opportunity to meet the crew and learn more about Polynesian wayfinding, ocean protection and the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage during a Talk Story event hosted by the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

hokulea bostonPrior to arriving in Boston, Hokulea spent three days in New Bedford, MA, where the crew conducted canoe tours and dockside activities. The canoe is scheduled to depart Boston on July 14, and then sail to Salem, MA.

Hokulea Reaches Woods Hole After Making Connections in Martha’s Vineyard

Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe Hokulea started the month of July with a sail to a new destination. After various engagements within the Martha’s Vineyard community, Hokulea departed at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, July 1 to make the journey over to Woods Hole.

Woods HoleA few members of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe and local community organizers that the crew connected with at Martha’s Vineyard accompanied the Hokulea crewmembers on their latest sail.

woods hole2The canoe’s noon arrival at Woods Hole was marked by a greeting at Dyer’s Dock from representatives of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribal nation and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute community. A short welcome ceremony was performed, including the performance of a song written about Hokulea by the children of the Neekun School, a Wôpanâak Language immersion program.

woods hole3“In this day and age, we know that it can be confusing about what is meaningful. But this is. This gathering, this togetherness is historical and we will speak of it for generations to come,” said Ramona Peters, an elder of the Mashpee Wampanoag, during the arrival ceremony.

woods hole4Today, the Hokulea crew are attending the  Mashpee Wampanoag’s 95th annual powwow. The three-day long Native American event filled with traditional songs, dances, cultural ceremonies and other intertribal activities will honor Hokulea as part of the program.

woods hole5The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, known as the People of the First Light, has inhabited present-day Massachusetts for more than 12,000 years.

woods hole6The crew and canoe are scheduled to participate in Woods Hole community events on July 4, departing July 5 for New Bedford followed by Boston.

Hokulea Arrives at Martha’s Vineyard for the First Time in Her History

Hokulea achieved another first in her epic Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage: the famed voyaging canoe and her crew arrived at Martha’s Vineyard yesterday, an area accessible only by boat or air travel.

Marthas VineyardThe canoe’s interaction with the local community highlighted the area’s thriving Native American tribes and innovative sustainability practices.

Marthas Vineyard2Hokulea’s sail to the dock was escorted by a mishoon, a traditional dugout canoe that the Wampanoag – a Native American tribe on the US east coast – had just finished building.

Marthas Vineyard3The mishoon is the first one built on the island in over 300 years. Captain Bruce Blankenfeld displayed two strands of wampum (beads made from shell) that the crew received from the tribe, to acknowledge the Wampanoag nation’s welcome.

Marthas Vineyard4Hundreds of local community members on the dock greeted the crewmembers from Hawaii with a welcoming ceremony.

Marthas Vineyard5Customary chants and speeches were exchanged between the Hokulea crew and the Wampanoag, in honor of each group’s respective traditions. The crew was also presented with gifts of school-grown food from the Edgartown School students.

Marthas Vineyard6The canoe’s arrival was particularly meaningful to Sanford Low, a Hokulea crewmember and current resident of Martha’s Vineyard. “To me, this day could not have gone better; it was full of aloha, it was full of spirit, and it was just plain joy,” Low said. “This is really a joining of two different islands across a massive ocean… This canoe has come, these people, this crew has come to learn from the people of Martha’s Vineyard and take back to Hawaii.”

Marthas Vineyard7Hokulea will remain docked at Martha’s Vineyard for a few days, and crewmembers will set up tents and exhibits for the local community to learn more about the Malama Honua message of taking care of Island Earth.

Marthas Vineyard8The canoe is slated to continue her sail to Woods Hole, Massachusetts on Friday.

Hokulea Crewmembers Conduct Crew Switch for the Next Leg in the Worldwide Voyage

While docked on Block Island on Wednesday, crewmembers of Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe Hokulea began the detailed process of a crew switch. The latest crew of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage arrived safely on Block Island, where they spent the day in training, preparing and receiving information from the canoe’s leg 20 crew, for leg 21 of Hokulea’s sail. Captain Bruce Blankenfeld conducted an orientation for the canoe’s latest crewmembers, as well as a brief overview of future port stops.

crew change

The Hokulea crew’s time on Block Island was spent engaging the local community through canoe tours and educational outreach. The canoe’s next stop is about 50 nautical miles away in Mystic Seaport, Connecticut where crewmembers will conduct lectures and interactive demonstrations of Polynesian wayfinding, voyaging and navigation at the Mystic Seaport Museum’s 25th Annual Wooden Boat Show.

Hokulea Arrives at Block Island

On Sunday, June 19 at approximately 8:00 p.m. local time (2:00 p.m. HST), Hawaii’s famed voyaging canoe Hokulea arrived at Block Island off the coast of Rhode Island after departing New York City on Sunday.
Block IslandAs part of the Hokulea crew’s protocol for showing respect for the land and its people, crew members sought permission to dock the sailing vessel from the indigenous tribes of the area. They were welcomed by a representative of the Narrangansett Indian Tribe. Hokulea captain and master navigator Kalepa Baybayan offered a kahili (feather standard) on behalf of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. 
block island2
Community members are encouraged to visit the canoe from 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 21 at the Block Island Boat Basin Marina for canoe tours and to learn more about the Worldwide Voyage. Hokulea is expected to remain on Block Island until Thursday, June 23, before continuing onto Mystic, Connecticut, with safety and weather conditions dictating any sail plans. 

Hokulea Takes Center Stage at the United Nations for World Oceans Day

Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe delivers messages to the Secretary General on behalf of the world’s oceans

Hawaii’s legendary traditional voyaging canoe Hokulea achieved the pinnacle of her historic four-year sail around the world at today’s United Nations (UN) celebration of  World Oceans Day: a global event focused on ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future.

United Nations

This year’s theme of “Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet” encouraged individuals and organizations across the globe to take action in preventing plastic pollution in our ocean, with programming that featured the powerful and lasting presence of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

United Nations 2

“Captain Nainoa, I wish you and your entire crew a wonderful return journey,” said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who sailed on Hokulea in Apia, Samoa in 2014. “I count on your leadership and commitment as we carry out our plans to make this world safer and more sustainable for all. On World Oceans Day, let us renew our resolve to protect these marine treasures for generations to come.”

United Nations 3

In today’s morning ceremony at Gantry Plaza State Park, Thompson presented UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Gyan Chandra Acharya, UN Under-Secretary-General and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, and Palau President Tommy E. Remengesau Jr. with ocean protection declarations and messages of hope that the Hokulea crew members collected from their worldwide journey promoting sustainable oceans.

United Nations 4

Later in the afternoon, Thompson joined Palau President Tommy E. Remengesau Jr. and representatives of the Federated States of Micronesia, for a talk-story session on the UN’s Ocean Agenda and goals. The leaders also discussed development regarding the negotiation of a new legally binding instrument to protect biodiversity in marine areas in the high seas.

united nations 5

After today’s events, Hokulea crew members will continue their outreach and engagement activities in New York, in which they will lead, participate in, and support the following events:

  • Thursday, June 9: Hokulea Storytellers Evening at Patagonia New YorkSoHo
  • Saturday, June 11: Hawaiian Airlines Liberty Challenge

 

Hokulea Crew on Governors Island for Education and Environment Summit

Community leaders discuss environmental restoration through the Billion Oyster Project

Today, crewmembers of the legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea continued their momentum of focusing on community outreach through the New York Education and Environment Summit. The crew was joined by educators and community members from Hawaii and New York.

Oyster project 1The summit was held on Governors Island, where the delegation was received by the Trust for Governors Island, the National Park Service, New York Harbor School, and the Billion Oyster Project. The Hawaii delegation included University of Hawaii President David Lassner, Kanu o Ka Aina and Ka Waihona o Ka Na auao charter schools’ administrators and students, and representatives and students from Kamehameha Schools. Honolulu City and County Mayor Kirk Caldwell was also present for the discussions that centered on sustainability and protection of the environment.

Oyster project
Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, delivered a short speech on the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage and its significant connections with the Billion Oyster Project – a STEM-based initiative aimed at restoring one billion live oysters in the New York Harbor.

oyster project 2

After the morning’s presentations and discussions, the New York Harbor School conducted tours of the facilities. Event attendees visited the aquaculture lab at the New York Harbor School where the oysters for the Billion Oyster Project are raised, and visited other indoor and outdoor learning environments at the innovative school. Billion Oyster Project Director Pete Malinowski answered questions from the Hawaii educators and students.

Oyster project 3

The summit is part of a roster of community events leading up to Hokulea’s significant role in the upcoming World Oceans Day gathering at the United Nations on Wednesday.

This week, Hokulea crew members will lead, participate in, and support the following events:

  • Tuesday, June 7: Presentation by master navigator Kalepa Baybayan on behalf of Imiloa Astronomy Center at Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History
  • Wednesday, June 8: World Oceans Day
  • Thursday, June 9: Hokulea Storytellers Evening at Patagonia New YorkSoHo
  • Saturday, June 11: Hawaiian Airlines Liberty Challenge

Hokulea Greeted by Thousands in New York City

After years of preparation, legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea arrived in New York City and was officially welcomed this morning by thousands of New York residents and a delegation of Hawaii leaders, educators, students and supporters.

Hokulea New York

Among those in attendance were Governor Ige’s Chief of Staff Mike McCartney, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell, Hawaii Island Mayor Billy Kenoi, Kauai Mayor Bernard Carvalho, Hawaii Island Senator Kai Kahele, Honolulu City Councilman Ikaika Anderson, Hawaii Tourism Authority President and CEO George Szigeti, Solomon “Sol” Aikau (Eddie Aikau’s older brother), marine artist Wyland and Solar Impulse pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg.

hokulea new york 2

The arrival event began with a traditional ceremonial welcome by Native American tribes from the area including the Ramapough Lenape Nation, Moraviantown Delaware Nation, Shinnecock, Unkechaug, Mohegan, and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. A traditional Hawaiian aha awa, or awa ceremony, was held by Hui Kipaepae of New York. Various hula halau (groups) from New York and Hawaii also offered performances celebrating the historic occasion.

Hokulea New York Kai

“There is something special that this canoe carries on behalf of our home that I think this world not only respects, but needs,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. “This day of celebration is really the step we need to give us strength to go to the United Nations on behalf of all of the people who are doing their part to be responsible for our island home called Earth.”

On World Oceans Day on June 8, a series of events with the United Nations will include a ceremonial presentation of ocean protection declarations by Thompson to Secretary General Ban-ki Moon. The canoe’s arrival at Manhattan’s North Cove Marina – the doorstep of the 9/11 Memorial, New York’s financial business district – marks the pinnacle point of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines.

Hokulea New York 3

During their time in New York, Hokulea crew members have a robust schedule of outreach and engagement, in which they will lead, participate in, and support the following events:

  • Monday, June 6: Malama Honua Education & Environment Summit at Governors Island
  • Tuesday, June 7: Presentation by master navigator Kalepa Baybayan on behalf of Imiloa Astronomy Center at Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History
  • Wednesday, June 8: World Oceans Day
  • Thursday, June 9: Hokulea Storytellers Evening at Patagonia New YorkSoHo
  • Saturday, June 11: Hawaiian Airlines Liberty Challenge

For Hokulea’s most up-to-date US east coast schedule, visit http://www.hokulea.com/hokuleas-planned-east-coast-port-stops/.

 

Hokulea Sails Through Florida and Georgia Via Intracoastal Waterway

Since departing Titusville, Florida, on Friday, April 8, 2016, Hokulea has been traveling north on the Intracoastal Waterway making overnight stops at Palm Coast and St. Augustine.

Hokulea Canal

Last night, she entered the state of Georgia for the first time and docked in Brunswick. Tonight, the canoe and crew are staying overnight in Fort McAllister, GA and plan to depart first thing tomorrow morning to continue the voyage up the East Coast.

Watch Captain Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau preps the tow line in anticipation of departure from Titusville Marina. Mahalo nui to everyone who came out to show their support and wish us well as we begin Leg 19.

Watch Captain Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau preps the tow line in anticipation of departure from Titusville Marina. Mahalo nui to everyone who came out to show their support and wish us well as we begin Leg 19.

The Hokulea and crew are scheduled to be part of the Charleston Outdoor Festival in South Carolina on April 15.

hokulea 41116

During the voyage up the Intracoastal Waterway, Hokulea has sailed under several bridges and the crew has spotted various kinds of wildlife including manatees, pelicans, dolphins and flamingoes.

Hokulea Sails To Florida

After spending six days in Cuba interacting with the country’s local community for the first time in her history, Hawaii’s famed voyaging canoe Hokulea continues her journey by sailing roughly 96 nautical miles north to Key West, Florida. The crew left Havana, Cuba early today at 6:00 a.m. and is estimated to arrive at the Sunshine State’s southernmost point at approximately 9:00 p.m. local time. Note: Florida is six hours ahead of Hawaii time.

Hokulea equator

“Our experience in Cuba was very memorable,” said Kalepa Baybayan, captain and pwo navigator on board Hokulea. “Once again, we discovered common threads with a community who is also perpetuating the Malama Honua message of taking care of our precious natural resources through various innovative initiatives.” The Cuba engagement gave the Hokulea crew the opportunity to see FINCA Marta, an organic farm that used mostly solar power for irrigation. The crewmembers also visited the Museo de la Canoa to learn about Caribbean canoe history and Old Havana Town.

The Key West stop will allow Hokulea to clear customs before she reaches the continental US at Everglades City, Florida in the next few days. In Florida, the crew will have the opportunity to honor the indigenous people of the land. From Florida, the canoe will travel up the US East Coast with stops in South Carolina, Virginia, Washington DC and New York. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to be part of the United Nations’ World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,500 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited. So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Click here for an archive of news releases since Hokulea’s 2014 Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage launch.

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Polynesian Voyaging Society Announces the Worldwide Voyage’s Upcoming Sail Plan – Hokulea to Set Sail Towards the US Mainland

Hokulea is changing course in pursuit of new connections and opportunities to share the principles of malama honua – caring for our Island Earth – the core mission of the legendary voyaging canoe’s ambitious Worldwide Voyage. The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) released the new sail plan today, which charts a course for the East Coast of the continental United States from her current position in the Caribbean en route to Havana, Cuba.

worldwide voyage

“We see tremendous opportunities in these ports to engage with people who are leading the world in sustainable practices, including those who are integrating indigenous knowledge and perspectives to inform the choices we make about our future world,” said Nainoa Thompson, President of PVS. “We are hungry to learn from these visionaries, and we are honored to have the opportunity to share the story of our Voyage with the communities we will visit.”

As part of this new sail plan, Hokulea’s first contact with the continental United States will be in Florida at the end of March, hosted by organizations and communities such as Everglades National Park.

“It makes sense to have Hokulea’s arrival into the continental U.S. be at a place that is not only a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but also a national park focused on restoring and protecting the country’s largest subtropical wilderness,” said Thompson. “This represents an important part of the mission of this Voyage, which is to recognize the efforts and learn from mission partners such as the National Park Service, which is celebrating its Centennial this year,” he added.

From Everglades National Park, the crew will sail up to Fort Meyers and then travel across the Florida peninsula via the Okeechobee Waterway to the eastern coast of the state, where they will celebrate the spirit of exploration and honor the late Lacy Veach at Kennedy Space Center in early April. Veach was a Hawaii-born NASA astronaut who first suggested the idea that Hokulea should sail around the world to share the message to care for Island Earth.

Following Florida, the crew will travel up the East Coast making several stops including South Carolina and Virginia. In Virginia, Hokulea and her crew will celebrate Earth Day with the Mariners’ Museum and community of Newport News, offering canoe tours and dockside outreach to the public. Additional engagement stops in Virginia include Yorktown and Tangier Island, where the crew will learn about the environmental issues affecting Chesapeake Bay and the efforts to protect the country’s largest watershed.

Continuing through the Chesapeake, Hokulea will sail to Piscataway Park, Maryland for a private ceremony with the area’s First Nations tribes followed by a Celebration of Friendship the next day that will take place in Old Town Alexandria, VA and will be open to the public. From there, the iconic canoe will arrive at the nation’s capital by sailing along the Potomac River and docking at the historic Washington Canoe Club.

After spending about a week in Washington D.C.,Hokulea will sail to New York City. On June 5, an arrival ceremony will be held as the canoe sails down the Hudson River and docks at North Cove Marina.

During Hokulea’s New York visit, the Polynesian Voyaging Society will be engaging in a variety of education and outreach activities. The organization has been working with local community organizations and schools in preparation for the June visit, and expects to reach out to children in different boroughs throughout the city.

On June 8, Hokulea will be a focal point at the World Oceans Day events hosted by the United Nations. The theme of this year’s World Oceans Day is Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet. UN delegates, global conservation leaders, Hawaii environmental leaders, Hawaii education leaders, and supporters will come together to hear first-hand stories of the state of the ocean and celebrate the journey of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. During this time, Thompson will share progress on the declarations and commitments to action entrusted to Hokulea during the Voyage from the UN Secretary General, world leaders, and communities.

“New York City will be a pivotal point of the Worldwide Voyage,” said Thompson. “This is the place where we will bring together many of our partners and fellow ocean protectors, and we will be able to reflect, celebrate and thank everyone who has supported our mission,” he added.

While in New York City, Hokulea also will participate in the Hawaiian Airlines Liberty Challenge, which is the East Coast’s largest Pacific Islands festival and one of the world’s most competitive outrigger races.

Hokulea is expected to depart New York City on June 18 for several engagements in the New England states including Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.

Worldwide Voyage collaborators for this sail plan engagement include the National Park Service, United States Forest Service, UNESCO, American Canoe Association, Halawai NY, Global Island Partnership (GLISPA), Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, and National Geographic Society among many others. PVS is working with U.S. East Coast schools to create opportunities for educational exchanges, and will open a door for Hawaii educators and students to join in these partnerships and engagement opportunities.

Sir Richard Branson Welcomes Navigator Nainoa Thompson and Hokulea to the British Virgin Islands

Legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea made a special stop and visited The Branson Estate on Moskito Island, which is owned by Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group.

Branson and Nainoa

Branson greeted master navigator Nainoa Thompson and the crew as the canoe arrived on March 5, 2016.  The visit gave Branson and Thompson an opportunity to share their respective efforts and thoughts about ocean conservation.  During the visit, Thompson also honoured Branson as a Great Navigator of Island Earth in recognition for his contribution to the Earth and mankind and for his lifetime achievement of making the world a better place. During the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, Thompson has been seeking out the Earth’s great navigators and has honored leaders such His Holiness Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

During the two day visit at Moskito Island, the crew was hosted at a welcome gathering and were able to explore the island’s pristine beaches.

Branson and Hokulea“On behalf of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Worldwide Voyage, it was an honor to bring Hokulea to Moskito Island while we are sailing through the Caribbean,” said Thompson.  “We were able to learn more about Sir Richard Branson’s work to conserve the Caribbean and hear how the region is becoming a leader in ocean conservation and sustainability,” he added.

Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group Founder, said: “The Hokulea, just like our ocean, is majestic and performs remarkably so it’s good to see she is sailing around the world urging citizens of our planet to care of our oceans.

“Caribbean islands emit less than 1% of total global greenhouse gases, but with rising sea levels and extreme weather events, they are bearing the brunt of climate change. I truly believe the small islands in the Caribbean can be global leaders in ocean conservation and sustainability. By working together we can act as a test bed to demonstrate and scale innovative, clean energy solutions.”

Branson and Nainoa 2

While on Moskito Island, the crew also hosted Branson, community members and students from the environmental club of Lavity Stoutt Community College on a sail on Hokulea.

Both Branson and Thompson are members of the Ocean Elders, an independent group of global leaders focused on the protection of the ocean.

Hokulea to Visit Cuba

The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) announced today that legendary traditional sailing canoe Hokulea will be making an historic visit to Cuba during the Caribbean leg of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Hokulea is expected to arrive at Havana, Cuba on March 17, 2016, for an approximate four-day visit after stopping in the US Virgin Islands and British Virgin Islands.Hokule’a Crew Members before they left Hilo, Hawaii.

Hokulea equator

PVS has been working with the Cubanakoa Foundation and Altruvistas on an itinerary for the Hokulea crew that includes a meeting with the Cuban Institute for Friendship with the Peoples about US-Cuba relations; briefings on Cuba’s marine conservation, urban sustainability and environmental efforts; and discussions about cultural connections between Cuba, Hawai’i and other island nations.

“Visiting Cuba supports the mission of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Because of the country’s political situation over the last few decades, Cuba has developed sustainability practices that are now considered a model for the rest of the world,” said Nainoa Thompson, President of PVS. “We look forward to learning more about Cuba’s cultural and environmental preservation efforts, and we hope to share the commonalities between Hawaii and this island nation,” he added.

Hokulea arrived in St. John, US Virgin Islands on Sunday, February 28, 2016, and is expected to depart for the British Virgin Islands on March 4, 2016, weather permitting. After the Cuba visit, Hokulea will sail to Florida and then up the East Coast, reaching New York City by June 8, 2016, for World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,000 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 180 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of mālama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/.