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Hokulea Sails Through Florida and Georgia Via Intracoastal Waterway

Since departing Titusville, Florida, on Friday, April 8, 2016, Hokulea has been traveling north on the Intracoastal Waterway making overnight stops at Palm Coast and St. Augustine.

Hokulea Canal

Last night, she entered the state of Georgia for the first time and docked in Brunswick. Tonight, the canoe and crew are staying overnight in Fort McAllister, GA and plan to depart first thing tomorrow morning to continue the voyage up the East Coast.

Watch Captain Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau preps the tow line in anticipation of departure from Titusville Marina. Mahalo nui to everyone who came out to show their support and wish us well as we begin Leg 19.

Watch Captain Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau preps the tow line in anticipation of departure from Titusville Marina. Mahalo nui to everyone who came out to show their support and wish us well as we begin Leg 19.

The Hokulea and crew are scheduled to be part of the Charleston Outdoor Festival in South Carolina on April 15.

hokulea 41116

During the voyage up the Intracoastal Waterway, Hokulea has sailed under several bridges and the crew has spotted various kinds of wildlife including manatees, pelicans, dolphins and flamingoes.

Hokulea Sails To Florida

After spending six days in Cuba interacting with the country’s local community for the first time in her history, Hawaii’s famed voyaging canoe Hokulea continues her journey by sailing roughly 96 nautical miles north to Key West, Florida. The crew left Havana, Cuba early today at 6:00 a.m. and is estimated to arrive at the Sunshine State’s southernmost point at approximately 9:00 p.m. local time. Note: Florida is six hours ahead of Hawaii time.

Hokulea equator

“Our experience in Cuba was very memorable,” said Kalepa Baybayan, captain and pwo navigator on board Hokulea. “Once again, we discovered common threads with a community who is also perpetuating the Malama Honua message of taking care of our precious natural resources through various innovative initiatives.” The Cuba engagement gave the Hokulea crew the opportunity to see FINCA Marta, an organic farm that used mostly solar power for irrigation. The crewmembers also visited the Museo de la Canoa to learn about Caribbean canoe history and Old Havana Town.

The Key West stop will allow Hokulea to clear customs before she reaches the continental US at Everglades City, Florida in the next few days. In Florida, the crew will have the opportunity to honor the indigenous people of the land. From Florida, the canoe will travel up the US East Coast with stops in South Carolina, Virginia, Washington DC and New York. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to be part of the United Nations’ World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,500 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited. So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Click here for an archive of news releases since Hokulea’s 2014 Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage launch.

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Polynesian Voyaging Society Announces the Worldwide Voyage’s Upcoming Sail Plan – Hokulea to Set Sail Towards the US Mainland

Hokulea is changing course in pursuit of new connections and opportunities to share the principles of malama honua – caring for our Island Earth – the core mission of the legendary voyaging canoe’s ambitious Worldwide Voyage. The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) released the new sail plan today, which charts a course for the East Coast of the continental United States from her current position in the Caribbean en route to Havana, Cuba.

worldwide voyage

“We see tremendous opportunities in these ports to engage with people who are leading the world in sustainable practices, including those who are integrating indigenous knowledge and perspectives to inform the choices we make about our future world,” said Nainoa Thompson, President of PVS. “We are hungry to learn from these visionaries, and we are honored to have the opportunity to share the story of our Voyage with the communities we will visit.”

As part of this new sail plan, Hokulea’s first contact with the continental United States will be in Florida at the end of March, hosted by organizations and communities such as Everglades National Park.

“It makes sense to have Hokulea’s arrival into the continental U.S. be at a place that is not only a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but also a national park focused on restoring and protecting the country’s largest subtropical wilderness,” said Thompson. “This represents an important part of the mission of this Voyage, which is to recognize the efforts and learn from mission partners such as the National Park Service, which is celebrating its Centennial this year,” he added.

From Everglades National Park, the crew will sail up to Fort Meyers and then travel across the Florida peninsula via the Okeechobee Waterway to the eastern coast of the state, where they will celebrate the spirit of exploration and honor the late Lacy Veach at Kennedy Space Center in early April. Veach was a Hawaii-born NASA astronaut who first suggested the idea that Hokulea should sail around the world to share the message to care for Island Earth.

Following Florida, the crew will travel up the East Coast making several stops including South Carolina and Virginia. In Virginia, Hokulea and her crew will celebrate Earth Day with the Mariners’ Museum and community of Newport News, offering canoe tours and dockside outreach to the public. Additional engagement stops in Virginia include Yorktown and Tangier Island, where the crew will learn about the environmental issues affecting Chesapeake Bay and the efforts to protect the country’s largest watershed.

Continuing through the Chesapeake, Hokulea will sail to Piscataway Park, Maryland for a private ceremony with the area’s First Nations tribes followed by a Celebration of Friendship the next day that will take place in Old Town Alexandria, VA and will be open to the public. From there, the iconic canoe will arrive at the nation’s capital by sailing along the Potomac River and docking at the historic Washington Canoe Club.

After spending about a week in Washington D.C.,Hokulea will sail to New York City. On June 5, an arrival ceremony will be held as the canoe sails down the Hudson River and docks at North Cove Marina.

During Hokulea’s New York visit, the Polynesian Voyaging Society will be engaging in a variety of education and outreach activities. The organization has been working with local community organizations and schools in preparation for the June visit, and expects to reach out to children in different boroughs throughout the city.

On June 8, Hokulea will be a focal point at the World Oceans Day events hosted by the United Nations. The theme of this year’s World Oceans Day is Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet. UN delegates, global conservation leaders, Hawaii environmental leaders, Hawaii education leaders, and supporters will come together to hear first-hand stories of the state of the ocean and celebrate the journey of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. During this time, Thompson will share progress on the declarations and commitments to action entrusted to Hokulea during the Voyage from the UN Secretary General, world leaders, and communities.

“New York City will be a pivotal point of the Worldwide Voyage,” said Thompson. “This is the place where we will bring together many of our partners and fellow ocean protectors, and we will be able to reflect, celebrate and thank everyone who has supported our mission,” he added.

While in New York City, Hokulea also will participate in the Hawaiian Airlines Liberty Challenge, which is the East Coast’s largest Pacific Islands festival and one of the world’s most competitive outrigger races.

Hokulea is expected to depart New York City on June 18 for several engagements in the New England states including Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.

Worldwide Voyage collaborators for this sail plan engagement include the National Park Service, United States Forest Service, UNESCO, American Canoe Association, Halawai NY, Global Island Partnership (GLISPA), Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, and National Geographic Society among many others. PVS is working with U.S. East Coast schools to create opportunities for educational exchanges, and will open a door for Hawaii educators and students to join in these partnerships and engagement opportunities.

Sir Richard Branson Welcomes Navigator Nainoa Thompson and Hokulea to the British Virgin Islands

Legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea made a special stop and visited The Branson Estate on Moskito Island, which is owned by Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group.

Branson and Nainoa

Branson greeted master navigator Nainoa Thompson and the crew as the canoe arrived on March 5, 2016.  The visit gave Branson and Thompson an opportunity to share their respective efforts and thoughts about ocean conservation.  During the visit, Thompson also honoured Branson as a Great Navigator of Island Earth in recognition for his contribution to the Earth and mankind and for his lifetime achievement of making the world a better place. During the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, Thompson has been seeking out the Earth’s great navigators and has honored leaders such His Holiness Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

During the two day visit at Moskito Island, the crew was hosted at a welcome gathering and were able to explore the island’s pristine beaches.

Branson and Hokulea“On behalf of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Worldwide Voyage, it was an honor to bring Hokulea to Moskito Island while we are sailing through the Caribbean,” said Thompson.  “We were able to learn more about Sir Richard Branson’s work to conserve the Caribbean and hear how the region is becoming a leader in ocean conservation and sustainability,” he added.

Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group Founder, said: “The Hokulea, just like our ocean, is majestic and performs remarkably so it’s good to see she is sailing around the world urging citizens of our planet to care of our oceans.

“Caribbean islands emit less than 1% of total global greenhouse gases, but with rising sea levels and extreme weather events, they are bearing the brunt of climate change. I truly believe the small islands in the Caribbean can be global leaders in ocean conservation and sustainability. By working together we can act as a test bed to demonstrate and scale innovative, clean energy solutions.”

Branson and Nainoa 2

While on Moskito Island, the crew also hosted Branson, community members and students from the environmental club of Lavity Stoutt Community College on a sail on Hokulea.

Both Branson and Thompson are members of the Ocean Elders, an independent group of global leaders focused on the protection of the ocean.

Hokulea to Visit Cuba

The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) announced today that legendary traditional sailing canoe Hokulea will be making an historic visit to Cuba during the Caribbean leg of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Hokulea is expected to arrive at Havana, Cuba on March 17, 2016, for an approximate four-day visit after stopping in the US Virgin Islands and British Virgin Islands.Hokule’a Crew Members before they left Hilo, Hawaii.

Hokulea equator

PVS has been working with the Cubanakoa Foundation and Altruvistas on an itinerary for the Hokulea crew that includes a meeting with the Cuban Institute for Friendship with the Peoples about US-Cuba relations; briefings on Cuba’s marine conservation, urban sustainability and environmental efforts; and discussions about cultural connections between Cuba, Hawai’i and other island nations.

“Visiting Cuba supports the mission of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Because of the country’s political situation over the last few decades, Cuba has developed sustainability practices that are now considered a model for the rest of the world,” said Nainoa Thompson, President of PVS. “We look forward to learning more about Cuba’s cultural and environmental preservation efforts, and we hope to share the commonalities between Hawaii and this island nation,” he added.

Hokulea arrived in St. John, US Virgin Islands on Sunday, February 28, 2016, and is expected to depart for the British Virgin Islands on March 4, 2016, weather permitting. After the Cuba visit, Hokulea will sail to Florida and then up the East Coast, reaching New York City by June 8, 2016, for World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,000 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 180 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of mālama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/.

Hokulea Reaches the US Virgin Islands in the Caribbean

Hokulea just accomplished another monumental touchpoint, as she arrived at Cruz Bay in St. John, US Virgin Islands (USVI) yesterday morning at 11:00 a.m. AST (Sunday, 5:00 a.m. HST). Note: The US Virgin Islands is six hours ahead of Hawaii time. The arrival also marks the canoe’s first landing in a US territory since Hokulea visited Pago Pago in American Samoa in October 2014.

Click to view videos of the arrival.

Click to view videos of the arrival.

“The US Virgin Islands is similar to Hawaii, with its rich history and tropical climate,” said Kalepa Baybayan, captain and Pwo navigator. “Also, much like our home, their economy is significantly driven by tourism and agriculture. We’re looking to engage with the residents to exchange ideas of Mālama Honua, of preservation and cultivation of precious resources.”

While in St. John, the crew of Hokulea plans to engage with the local community by participating in outreach opportunities with the Virgin Islands National Park and the Coral Reef National Monument. The crew members also plan to collaborate with other groups and organizations such as local schools like Sprauve, Gifft Hill, and St. John Christian Academy.

The leg from Brazil to the USVI is a homecoming for Polynesian Voyaging Society Chief Operating Officer and crewmember Heidi Guth, who was born on Maui but raised in the USVI.

“Being able to connect two of my homes and families by having Hokulea visit St. John during the Centennial of the National Park Service and the 60th Anniversary of the Virgin Islands National Park is an unbelievable dream,” said Guth. “I’m also excited about the opportunity to share and exchange ideas on caring for each of coastal homes, our oceans and out Island Earth. We have a common interest in natural and cultural perpetuation,” she added.

While in the Caribbean, Hokulea and her crew also hope to learn more about and highlight environmental efforts such as the Caribbean Challenge, an initiative that focuses on the conservation of biodiversity within the Caribbean’s national protected areas and other areas of environmental significance. The goals of the initiative include effectively conserving and managing at least 20 percent of the Caribbean’s marine and coastal environment by the year 2020, and establishing long-term funding resources for marine, coastal and other environmental resources. Participating countries include Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, British Virgin Islands, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

From the USVI, Hokulea and her crew will continue the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage and stop in several ports in the Caribbean before sailing north and visiting cities along the East Coast of the United States. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to be part of the United Nations’ World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,500 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited. So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind.

1,000 Desks Donated to South African Schools on Behalf of the Worldwide Voyage

Hokulea crewmembers and a delegation of Hawaii students, teachers and families visited St. Mary’s Catholic Primary School near Cape Town, South Africa to present 50 Tutudesks featuring artwork inspired by the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. An additional 1,000 desks will be delivered to township schools in the Durban, South Africa area in early 2016. The donation of desks will support the campaign’s goal to provide 20 million desks to 20 million children by 2020.

tutudesk

“These Tutudesks will help students have space at home to do their homework. Even in the   classroom, it’s going to help teachers do individual work with each child,” said Vuyiswa Lebenya, principal of St. Mary’s Catholic Primary School.

Following the presentation, Ke Ka o Makalii – a group comprised of teachers and students from Kamehameha Schools and Halau Ku Mana Public Charter School – offered hula and mele celebrating the past voyages of Hokulea. Students from St. Mary’s then followed with their own local songs and dances before inviting the Hawaii delegation to participate.

tutudesk2

“When I saw them dancing together, that is what global peace looks like. It’s finding that rhythm that’s down deep inside that allows us to be completely the same, to be respectful and caring of everyone,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Hokulea crewmembers and the Hawaii delegation are in South Africa this week as part of Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

tutudesk1

The Desmond Tutu Tutudesk Campaign provides portable school desks to children in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 95 million school children do not have the benefit of a classroom desk. This shortage affects the development of literacy and overall academic performance.

Hawaii Senate Honors Hokulea’s 40 Year History

In an historic gathering in the Senate chambers, Hawai’i’s State Senators recognized the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the twelve living crew members from the Hōkūle‘a’s maiden voyage to Tahiti in 1976. It is the first time all living members of the Hōkūle‘a’s original crew were together since the inaugural voyage.

Senatehonorshokulea

Recognizing the impact the Hōkūle‘a and the Polynesian Voyaging Society has made on the state of Hawai‘i, Senators honored the 40th anniversary of the legendary sailing canoe and its birth of the revival of traditional voyaging and wayfinding.

“This dedicated crew has inspired generations to be proud of their Pacific heritage and to continue to seek inclusive island wisdom of sustainability, responsibility and mutual respect and caring,” said Senator Gilbert Kahele (D 1st District – Hilo, Pi‘ihonua, Kaūmana, Waiākea, Keaukaha). “Hōkūle‘a is more than a voyaging canoe, she represents a design shared by the people of Hawai‘i, the Pacific and the world to perpetuate and protect our most cherished values and places from disappearing.”

“Forty years is a long time and it raises the question: ‘Is something like a voyaging canoe relevant? Does it still have meaning and value to our society?’” said Nainoa Thompson, pwo navigator, president of PVS and crewmember of the 1976 maiden voyage. “We are grateful to have our governmental body take the time to celebrate the worldwide voyage and to me, it shows that Hawai‘i is still with us, that the canoe still matters. As the voyage now heads into the Indian Ocean, which is much more dangerous, it gives us the strength to set sail.”

Honored today on the Senate floor:

  • Ben Finney, Ph.D. – In 1973, Finney co-founded the Polynesian Voyaging Society with Herb Kāne and Tommy Holmes. He served as PVS’s first president.
  • Milton “Shorty” Bertelmann – Bertelmann first learned traditional, observational navigation from Mau Piailug during the sail from Hawai‘i to Tahiti. He served as captain on Hōkūle‘a in 1980 and 1985.
  • Richard “Buffalo” Keaulana – Often referred to as the “Mayor of Makaha,” Keaulana is the winner of the 1960 Makaha International.
  • John Kruse – Kruse is a pillar of the canoe community on Kaua‘i and continues to lead work on the Garden Isle’s own sailing canoe, Namahoe.
  • William “Billy” Richards – Richards serves as a director on several public service organizations, Native Hawiian and educational boards, including Paepae O He‘eia, Bishop Museum Association Council, and ‘Aha Kāne. He is presently the Director of Communications for Partners in Development Foundation, a public not-for-profit company that serves the Native Hawaiian community through social and educational programs.
  • Charles Nainoa Thompson – Thompson is the first Hawaiian to practice the art of wayfinding on long distance ocean voyages since such voyaging ended in Hawai‘i around the 14th century. He now teaches a system of wayfinding that he developed by synthesizing traditional principles of ancient Pacific navigation and modern science.
  • Abraham “Snake” Ah Hee – Ah Hee is a veteran of the National Guard and served a tour in Vietnam.  He credits the Hōkūle‘a’s voyage for strengthening the Hawaiian culture in spirit.
  • Francis Kainoa Lee – Lee became a part of the Hōkūle‘a’s first crew after his wife signed him up for a workshop in Kualoa to get acquainted with sailing the wa‘a. Lee has sailed on many voyages since and continues to support the crews in the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage.
  • Kimo Lyman – Lyman worked for the first fire department in Waialua. He is a veteran of many sails on Hōkūlea starting in 1976 and was the instrumental navigator on the voyage from Tahiti to Hawai‘i.
  • Gordon Pi‘ianai‘a – Pi‘ianai‘a’s career at sea began shortly after he graduated from the Kamehameha Schools for boys and he entered the Navy. Gordon started sailing on Hōkūle‘a in 1976 and has served as captain on numerous legs, while sailing a part of each of the voyages from 1980 through 2014.
  • Penny Martin – Martin is one of only two women who took part in Hōkūle‘a’s first voyage in 1976. She now works for Papahana Kualoa’s Lelekamanu Project where she teaches cultural- based environmental education.
  • Dr. Ben Young – Dr. Young served as the crew’s doctor on the first voyage in 1976. Young authored the article, Psychological Effects of Long Ocean Voyages, which is still used to educate new crewmembers on how to recognize and plan for the psychological effects that could be experienced during long voyages.

Volunteers and employees of the University of Hawai‘i Honolulu Community College and its Marine Education and Training Center and the                                                                                                                                                                                                        Polynesian Voyaging Society who have supported the many sails over the past 40 years were also recognized on the Senate floor.  They include:

  • Cecelia Lindo — one of the first staff of PVS
  • Haʻaheo Mansfield — one of the first staff of PVS
  • Bert Kaihe Barber — one of the first volunteers for PVS and Hōkūleʻa
  • Robert Perkins — Director of the Marine Education and Training Center (where Hōkūleʻa and PVS are housed)
  • Laura Thompson — PVS Board Member, wife of Pinky Thompson and mother of Nainoa Thompson
  • Clyde Nāmuʻo — CEO of PVS
  • Dennis Kawaharada — Kapiʻolani Community College, English faculty and long-time PVS documenter
  • Neil Hannahs — PVS Board Chair
  • Marisa Hayase — PVS Communications Director
  • Lilikalā Kameʻeleihiwa — PVS Board Member
  • Billy Ornellas — PVS Board Member
  • Erika Lacro — Chancellor of Honolulu Community College

“Hōkūleʻa continues to be Hawai‘i’s canoe, a floating classroom for Hawai‘i and Island Earth, building on the awareness and understanding generated from her historic launching forty years ago,” said Sen. Kahele. “We extend our best wishes for the safety and success in their journey on their Mālama Honua, the Worldwide Voyage.”

For more information on the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage: www.hokulea.com

Jack Johnson and Polynesian Voyaging Society Launch Song Celebrating 40 Years of Hōkūleʻa

The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) today launched a special online crowdfunding campaign in partnership with musician Jack Johnson.

Nainoa Thompson and Jack Johnson

Nainoa Thompson and Jack Johnson

The campaign, which is now live at RallySong.com, offers users a chance to download the song “Na Ho‘okele Opoipio (The Young Navigators),” which was written by Chucky Boy Chock and recorded with Johnson and Paula Fuga in honor of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

“The Polynesian discovery of islands throughout the Pacific Ocean was one of humanity’s most amazing achievements,” said Jack Johnson, songwriter and musician. “With the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, we have a new generation of navigators exploring the earth and bringing people together to find a sustainable future. We are proud to support them with this song, “Na Hoʻokele Opiopio,” which means, “The Young Navigators.”

Cultivating and nurturing the next generation of navigators is a key focus for the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, which seeks to educate people and communities around the world about the values of traditional wayfinding (non-instrument navigation) and the importance of caring for our Island Earth.

Chucky, Jack and Paula

Chucky Boy, Jack and Paula

“We are grateful to Jack Johnson, Chucky Boy, and Paula for honoring our next generation of navigators,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Jack and Paula and Chucky Boy“Across the globe, there are young people with the courage to set a new course and protect our natural environment. They are our leaders and navigators, whether they are on canoes or not, and we hope this campaign will provide a way for more people to join our voyage.”

All proceeds from the RallySong campaign will benefit PVS and the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. In addition to purchasing and downloading the song, fans can also purchase collector’s items and enter a raffle for a chance to win grand prizes such as an ukulele autographed by Jack Johnson and a Papa He‘e Nalu (small wood surfboard), crafted with mahagony wood from the deckboards of the Hōkūleʻa. The campaign runs through April 25, 2015 and seeks to meet a fundraising goal of $75,000.

“This fundraiser comes at a critical juncture for PVS and the Worldwide Voyage, as we prepare to leave the Pacific for the first time,” said Clyde Namuʻo, PVS Chief Executive Officer. “In 2015 we will be travelling from New Zealand to Australia and South Africa, and every contribution from our community will make it possible for us to complete this historic leg of our journey around the world.”

Hōkūleʻa, a traditional Polynesian voyaging canoe, is celebrating 40 years this year since her first launch from the sacred shores of Hakipu‘u-Kualoa in Kāne‘ohe Bay, O’ahu, on March 8, 1975. The iconic canoe helped contribute to a significant generation of renewal for Hawaiian culture and language, and revitalized voyaging and navigation traditions throughout the Pacific Ocean.

The Hawaiian name for this journey, Mālama Honua, means “to care for our Island Earth” and is taking Hōkūleʻa and her sister canoe Hikianalia across Earth’s oceans to grow a global movement toward a more sustainable world. The Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines, will cover 47,000 nautical miles, 85 ports, 26 nations, including 12 of UNESCO’s Marine World Heritage sites, through June 2017. The canoes are currently in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Hōkūleʻa Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of Her First Launch

Hōkūleʻa, the iconic canoe of the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) and the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, will celebrate her landmark 40th anniversary with a series of celebratory events and festivities throughout 2015.

hokulea4The traditional Polynesian voyaging canoe, designed by artist and historian Herb Kawainui Kane, launched from the sacred shores of Kualoa in Kāne‘ohe Bay, O’ahu, on March 8, 1975. The launch of Hōkūleʻa helped begin a generation of renewal for Hawai‘i’s people that, along with the revitalization of voyaging and navigation traditions, introduced a new-found respect and appreciation for Hawaiian culture and language in the state of Hawai‘i and beyond.

Hokulea Nainoa

“Hōkūleʻa is more than a voyaging canoe – she awakened us to the importance of bringing people together from all walks of life to perpetuate the values we care about in Hawaiʻi,” said Nainoa Thompson, master navigator and president of PVS. “We have a kuleana to build a future worthy of our children. As we celebrate 40 years of sailing, we look forward to sharing Hōkūleʻa’s story, and hope that she inspires many more people to navigate their own voyages of kindness and compassion.”

Hokulea1In celebration of Hōkūleʻa’s 40th anniversary, PVS will ask community members in Hawaiʻi, the 26 Polynesian islands visited this year, and future ports of the Worldwide Voyage to share a birthday message and submit inspiring local “stories of hope” about young people taking leadership roles in caring for their natural environment and culture. This “Birthday to Earth Day” campaign will run from March 8 to April 23 on hokulea.com.

Anniversary festivities throughout 2015 include a fundraising campaign with local musicians Jack Johnson, Chucky Boy Chock and Paula Fuga, a talk story series and birthday Paʻina hosted by ‘Ulu‘ulu at the University of Hawai‘i at West O’ahu, an Earth Day beach cleanup, summer film screenings, and events in conjunction with the Friends of Hawaiʻi State Libraries. Events will be posted on hokulea.com.

hokulea5Since her first voyage to Tahiti in 1976, Hōkūleʻa, which means “Star of Gladness,” has brought together hundreds of thousands of people throughout the Pacific Ocean. As she continues to connect stories of hope throughout the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, Hōkūleʻa will seek to inspire and establish a lasting network of people and cultures around the globe to work collectively to care for our Island Earth.

The Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage is taking Hōkūleʻa and her sister canoe Hikianalia across Earth’s oceans to grow a global movement toward a more sustainable world. The Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines, will cover 47,000 nautical miles, 85 ports, 26 nations, including 12 of UNESCO’s Marine World Heritage sites, through June 2017. The canoes are currently in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Hōkūleʻa’s 40th Anniversary March Events (Please check hokulea.com for updates and ongoing events):

March 10 through April 22
Hōkūleʻa “Birthday to Earth Day” campaign at hokulea.com

March 16, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Celebrating Hōkūleʻa @ ʻUluʻulu—University of Hawai‘i at West O’ahu: Talk Story with Keoni Lee.

Keoni Lee, co-founder of ʻŌiwi TV and a crewmember of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, will share about ʻŌiwi TV’s efforts to document the voyage using video, social media and other technologies. He will discuss the diverse traditional and new media channels used to share Hōkūleʻa’s story with Hawai’i and the world.

March 17, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Celebrating Hōkūleʻa @ ‘Ulu‘ulu – University of Hawai‘i West O‘ahu: 40th Anniversary Pā‘ina.

Join us for a pā‘ina celebration of Hōkūleʻa and her 40 years of accomplishments. Polynesian Voyaging activities for students and the public, with music and light refreshments.

March 19, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Celebrating Hōkūleʻa @ ‘Ulu‘ulu – University of Hawai‘i West O‘ahu: Elisa Yadao & Cliff Watson
Elisa Yadao, a former television news reporter, and Cliff Watson, cameraman and producer, will share their experiences documenting Hōkūleʻa’s early voyages and share footage from the archives.

April 25
Earth Day Mauka to Makai Cleanup
Join PVS and Sustainable Coastlines at Kailua Beach Park to help us mālama aina this Earth Day.

Hōkūleʻa Ventures Furthest from the Equator in Her History

Traditional Polynesian voyaging canoe Hōkūle’a achieved a new milestone in her journey around the word. During this leg of the Worldwide Voyage, she successfully completed the roundtrip sail from Wellington to Golden Bay, New Zealand. This marks the furthest into the Southern Hemisphere that Hōkūleʻa has sailed in four decades of voyaging. The crew returned safely to Wellington on Saturday, and Hōkūleʻa is now in route to Napier, New Zealand.

Hokulea equator

This leg of the Worldwide Voyage was an ambitious journey, taking Hōkūle’a far beyond the warm waters of the Pacific in which she has travelled extensively over the past four decades. The harsh sea and weather conditions along New Zealand’s South Island and beyond will continue to push the boundaries of contemporary Polynesian voyaging as Hōkūleʻa sails around the world.

hokulea equator3

“On March 8th, 1975, Hōkūle’a was launched with the vision of one voyage to Tahiti and back,” said Bruce Blankenfeld, Pwo (master) navigator with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. “She has been restored and reenergized through the aloha and good mana of our large voyaging community, young and old, from near and far. In 2015, 40 years later, she continues to afford us the opportunity to explore new horizons.”

While on South Island on January 21, 2015, crew had the opportunity to visit and honor the place where a 600-year-old voyaging canoe was recently rediscovered.

hokulea equator 2

Making this connection between Hōkūle’a and her ancient predecessor honors Polynesians’ ability to explore the ocean world, proving the strength and vitality of these voyaging vessels. This ancient Polynesian double-hulled canoe “is the reason why Hōkūleʻa sailed to Mohua Bay,” said the captain for this leg of the voyage, Kālepa Baybayan. “It is to pay homage, to recognize the importance of this artifact.”

“This is the farthest south we have ever gone to a part of the ocean that is notoriously rough,” said Nainoa Thompson, Pwo navigator and president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. “It was accomplished because of unprecedented collaborations and support, and Kālepa Baybayan’s good leadership. This leg of the Worldwide Voyage was extensive, exceptional, and honored our traditions. It was foundational to our ability to do well as we prepare to depart Polynesia.”

The Hawaiian name for this journey, Mālama Honua, means “to care for our Island Earth” and is taking Hōkūleʻa and her sister canoe Hikianalia across Earth’s oceans to grow a global movement toward a more sustainable world. The Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines, will cover 47,000 nautical miles, 85 ports, 26 nations, including 12 of UNESCO’s Marine World Heritage sites, through June 2017.

Hōkūle‘a Departure Update – Tahiti First Stop on Voyage Around World

Hōkūleʻa and Hikianala are in Hilo, their last stop in Hawai‘i before their voyage around the world!

Hokulea in Radio Bay

Hōkūle‘a in Radio Bay

On Saturday, 5/24, private cultural ceremonies will take place early in the morning to help prepare and protect our crew members and our waʻa. From 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., the local community has spearheaded a public opportunity to share mākana and visit the waʻa. Mahalo nui loa for the hospitality and the aloha in Palekai/Radio Bay.

The Hōkūle‘a being worked on. Picture courtesy of Pillars of Peace

The Hōkūle‘a being worked on. Picture courtesy of Pillars of Peace

After the noon hour on Saturday, 5/24, the crew and waʻa will go into a kapu period of rest, reflection, and emotional and spiritual preparation for the journey ahead. Our captains, working together with the national weather service, have noted that the appropriate winds for our journey will likely not appear until Tuesday 5/27.

Na Aumakua of the Hōkūle‘a

Na Aumakua of the Hōkūle‘a

As Nainoa Thompson remarked, “Mau taught me patience, letting me know that we do not tell the wind what to do–the wind tells us what to do.” We look forward to the right conditions for departure on or after Tuesday 5/27, and to celebrating with the Hilo community this Saturday.

Hawaiian Electric Industries Contributes $250,000 for Hokulea’s Historic Voyage

The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) and its related companies American Savings Bank,  Hawaiian Electric, Hawaii Electric Light and Maui Electric to support its historic voyage, Malama Honua (care for the Earth), a five-year, around-the-world odyssey by long-distance canoes Hokulea and Hikianalia.

PVS has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) to support Hokulea. Standing left to right are: Jenna Ishii (PVS), Nainoa Thompson (PVS), Rich Wacker (American Savings Bank), Connie Lau (HEI), Dick Rosenblum (Hawaiian Electric) and Clyde Namuo (PVS). Photo credit: Oiwi TV.

PVS has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) to support Hokulea. Standing left to right are: Jenna Ishii (PVS), Nainoa Thompson (PVS), Rich Wacker (American Savings Bank), Connie Lau (HEI), Dick Rosenblum (Hawaiian Electric) and Clyde Namuo (PVS). Photo credit: Oiwi TV.

HEI’s grant will help to document the voyage and collect, interpret and share scientific and cultural data for a global audience. While Hokulea is the traditionally navigated voyaging canoe using ancestral knowledge and signs of nature to navigate the ocean, Hikianalia is the ecologically friendly and high-tech support canoe powered by photovoltaic panels, electric motors and sails with satellite communications capability. The two vessels will bridge culture, tradition and indigenous knowledge with modern technology while they serve as platforms for exploration, communication and connection.

“We are proud to be a part of this extraordinary journey which will build relationships across the globe,” said Connie Lau, HEI president and CEO. “We applaud PVS for their efforts to foster culture, education, exploration and sustainability as we share the same commitment to make Hawaii and the world a better place for our children and generations to follow.”

American Savings Bank plans to further support Hokulea awareness and fundraising efforts in their marketing and public relations activities, as well as tie in to their Bank for Education program which promotes excellence in education. The Hawaiian Electric Companies also are partnering with PVS to raise awareness. The Companies are interested in the efforts of the solar- and wind-powered vessel Hikianalia which will capture and use data to provide curricula and lesson plans directly from the voyaging canoes to classrooms in Hawaii.

“We are grateful for the strong partnerships with individuals, businesses and organizations like Hawaiian Electric Industries who share our values and vision for the Worldwide Voyage,” said Nainoa Thompson, PVS president.  “HEI’s contribution will help assure a sustainable future that honors the health and well-being of our islands, oceans, culture and people.”

“Hokulea’s historic voyage reminds us of our host culture’s courage and knowledge as well as our willingness to embrace the future,” added Alan Oshima, president of HEI’s Charitable Foundation. “We think the attention that will be given to the two canoes and their crews will inspire us to overcome challenges, hopefully inspiring new leaders.  For these reasons, we are proud to support Malama Honua.”

Hawaii Education Leaders Partnering in Worldwide Voyage

Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi and Hawaii State Board of Education members today joined education leaders from public and private sectors in signifying their shared support for and participation with the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s (PVS’s) Worldwide Voyage.

Just an overexposed picture I kind of like

Just an overexposed picture I kind of like

Representatives from early childhood to higher education institutions gathered at the Marine Education and Training Center on Oahu’s Sand Island to sign a memorandum of understanding in support of community based and sustainable education aligned with the PVS’s voyaging canoes Hokulea and sister vessel Hikianalia. Titled “Promise to Children,” the MOU states in part that, “We will transform our schools, empower youthful voices, and accept the responsibility of Malama Honua. We believe that by inspiring children to explore, discover and learn about Island Earth, they will navigate the future of humanity toward vitality, renewal, and compassion.”

Jenna Ishii explains some of the safety equipment

Jenna Ishii explains some of the safety equipment

“We are … excited that we can make the claim that Hawaii is with us,” said master navigator Nainoa Thompson. He said the Hokulea, in preparation for its Worldwide Voyage, has hosted more than 20,000 school children and community members while visiting ports across the Islands.

Over the next 48 months, the Worldwide Voyage will sail 49,000 nautical miles, visiting 26 countries and 85 ports while sharing Hawaii’s culture with the world. Educators are collaborating on curriculum aligned with Worldwide Voyage activities. Students will be able to embark on a virtual educational journey and participate via various technology channels and the Internet.

The decks were so hot when I was aboard the Hokulea, that they had to keep splashing water on the deck to keep our feet from burning

The decks were so hot when I was aboard the Hokulea, that they had to keep splashing water on the deck to keep our feet from burning

“This voyage not only offers lessons about world exploration and Hawaiian navigation but also the cultivation of aloha and valued Hawaiian traditions,” said Superintendent Matayoshi. “We are excited to be a partner in this educational endeavor and will build upon the knowledge over the course of the next four years. We are grateful to the Polynesian Voyaging Society for including our public school students and teachers in this mission.”

While the vessels are not slated to depart Hawaii until May 2014, plans for the Worldwide Voyage are already changing the lives of children such as Daniel Corpuz, who has been visiting the Hokulea as part of an educational program.

“It was only natural that I fell in love with PVS,” he said about growing up near the ocean in Waianae. He said the program has engaged students with culturally relevant, hands-on learning and will help change negative stereotypes on the Leeward Coast. “As they are judging, we are learning,” Corpuz added.

The Hōkūle‘a

The Hōkūle‘a

Follow along with the educational program on the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s website at hokulea.org.

The Hawaii State Department of Education is the ninth largest U.S. school district and the only statewide educational system in the country. It is comprised of 288 schools and serves more than 185,000 students. To learn more about the Department, its goals and vision for success, visit HawaiiPublicSchools.org.

 

16-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Receives Wish of a Lifetime Aboard the Hōkūleʻa

The Polynesian voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa welcomed special guests Sunday as she sailed from her home port at Sand Island to her final Hawai‘i stop of the Mālama Hawaiʻi portion of the Worldwide Voyage, Ko Olina. On board was Wish Kid Colin, his mom, his brother Chase and his aunt; Colin was receiving his wish-come-true.

Colin takes the helm of the Hokulea

Colin takes the helm of the Hokulea

After facing a life-threatening diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyasarcoma, countless treatments and hospital stays, Colin’s one true wish was to travel to O‘ahu for a sailing experience, and the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) partnered with Make-A-Wish® Hawaii to grant his wish. PVS crewmembers were quick to volunteer to support Colin’s wish – many of those on Sunday’s voyage were cancer survivors themselves.

Colin has had a life-long love for sailing that started with sailing excursions with his dad who was in the Navy and a sailor at heart. Tom, Colin’s father, passed away very suddenly and unexpectedly in January 2010, and then Colin was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of cancer two years later. Today, Colin can say he is cancer clear and he felt this wish would not only realize his passion, but honor his family, particularly his father, as well.

Colin and brother Chase

Colin and brother Chase

Once under sail, a pule, prayer, was said and introductions were made, as is traditional. During the sail, Colin and Chase (10) helped to steer the waʻa and participated in story telling exchanges with the crew. Colin’s mom and aunt did not hop on the sweep, but actively shared stories with the crew. It was a happy sunset sail, with a lot of laughter and learning.

“We are incredibly honored to work with Polynesian Voyaging Society to help make Colin’s wish come true,” said Siana Hunt, President and CEO Make-A-Wish Hawaii. “We believe that a wish can be powerful medicine for children battling life-threatening conditions and we would not be able to bring wishes true without the support of our community; the type of incredible support shown by PVS with Colin’s wish. Colin was shown the true spirit of aloha and we couldn’t be more grateful for PVS’s involvement.”

Nainoa Thompson

Nainoa Thompson

As the sail completed, Master navigator Nainoa Thompson told Colin “you are a star of hope.” Colin smiled and said the sail was just as he imagined it would be.

“Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau” Premieres October 1st on ESPN

Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau chronicles the remarkable life and times of the late Eddie Aikau, the legendary Hawaiian big wave surfer, pioneering lifeguard and ultimately doomed crew member of the Polynesian voyaging canoe Hokulea.

Legend of Eddie Aikau

With its rich combination of archival imagery, dramatic reenactments, contemporary interviews and meticulously researched historical source material Hawaiian is a compelling examination of the tragic decline and extraordinary rebirth of the Hawaiian culture as personified by a native son whose dynamic life and heroic death served as inspiration to an entire spiritual movement.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/8qhnDCPPPgY]

30 for 30 ‘Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau’ premieres October 1st, 8pm ET on ESPN.

Maui and Molokai Residents Invited to Visit the Hōkūle‘a

The Polynesian voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a welcomes the public to visit her in Mā‘alaea Harbor for a few more days.  Crew members have been connecting with youth and community groups since their arrival on Maui on June 17th.

The Hokulea in Hilo

The Hokulea in Hilo

A community presentation about the upcoming Worldwide Voyage is planned for Wednesday, June 26, from 6:00-8:00 PM at the headquarters of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary at 726 S. Kīhei Road (see attached flyer).  Apprentice navigator Ka‘iulani Murphy and crewmembers from Hui ‘o Wa‘a Kaulua, ‘Ohana Wa‘a and Polynesian Voyaging Society will be sharing their stories.

While docked at Mā‘alaea, the public is welcome to visit Hōkūle‘a between 9 AM – 12 noon and 1-5 PM through the 27th.

Mālama Hawai‘i is the first leg of Mālama Honua, the Worldwide Voyage sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines.  Hōkūle‘a will pay respects to communities throughout Hawai‘i in gratitude for 38 years of support of voyaging here.

Na Aumakua of the Hokulea

Na Aumakua of the Hokulea

In addition, we will feature stories of leadership and wise practices in resource management, voyaging and navigation, innovative education, and cultural practice throughout the islands.  The plans for the Worldwide Voyage will be shared at every port.  Over the next several weeks*, Hōkūle‘a will be in the waters of Maui Nui:

  • Through June 27      Mā‘alaea, Maui
  • June 28 – Jul 1           Lahaina, Maui
  • July 1 – 3                      Kealaikahiki, Kaho‘olawe
  • July 3 – 8                      Mānele, Lāna‘i
  • July 8 – 15                   Kaunakakai, Moloka‘i
  • August 16 – 18           Hāna, Maui
  • August 18 – 19           Honolua, Maui
  • August 19 – 20          Kalaupapa, Moloka‘i
  • August 20 – 23          Kaunakakai, Moloka‘i

* All dates are subject to change.  Committed to the safety of our crews and vessels, all sail dates are weather/safety dependent.

The Hōkūle‘a Arrives in Hilo – Malama Hawaii (Statewide Sails) and Malama Honua (Worldwide Voyage)

Today I had the opportunity to check out the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Canoe the Hōkūle‘a as it has arrived in Hilo as it prepares to take off for its “Malama Hawaii” (statewide sails) before the Malama Honua (worldwide voyage).

Hōkūle‘a ported at Radio Bay in Hilo

Hōkūle‘a ported at Radio Bay in Hilo

The Worldwide Voyage will include stops at more than 60 ports in more than 20 countries, all connected by ocean, most with traditional systems of ocean voyaging.

The Hōkūle‘a

The Hōkūle‘a

Here is a map of the planned route that they plan on taking:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Crew member Kim Kuulei Birnie talked about the pending voyage and the route that the vessels will take and explained how this is the first time that the vessels have ever been out of the Pacific Ocean as part of their planned route will take them through the Panama Canal and into the Atlantic Ocean and beyond.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/DANTGFPV-5U]

I was invited out to the vessel along with David Corrigan from Big Island Video News and Tiffany Edwards Hunt from Big Island Chronicle and we got to ask crew members about the pending trip.

David Corrigan interviews Kim Kuulei Birnie

David Corrigan interviews Kim Kuulei Birnie

Tiffany Edwards Hunt checks out one of the places to sleep on board

Tiffany Edwards Hunt checks out one of the places to sleep on board

Education Specialist Jenna Ishii was kind enough to explain how things worked aboard the ship and was honest enough to tell us that one of the most difficult tasks they have is actually going to the bathroom as they have to harness themselves to rope and then do their business over the side of the boat.

Jenna Ishii explains some of the safety equipment

Jenna Ishii explains some of the safety equipment

She explained in all the years that the vessels have been going on there has been only three incidents of a crew member falling over board however they are prepared for it when and if it were to happen.

Ishii shows us the flashing beacon that is tossed over shores if someone goes overboard

Ishii shows us the flashing beacon that is tossed off the boat if someone goes overboard

“Since Hokulea’s launch in 1975, Hawaiians have reclaimed and refined the art of wayfinding, non-instrument navigation that synthesizes tradition principles of Pacific Navigation and modern scientific knowledge.”

"Eddie Would Go!"

“Eddie Would Go!”

Here is one of the press releases I received from them on Why Hokulea Voyages:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Here is the tentative Sail Plan and Port List, of course this could all change because of a lot of factors but this is what they are shooting for… note that this first year is what is termed the Malama Honua Hawaii Tour as it travels throughout the Hawaii Islands for the next year to make sure the vessels are prepared for the worldwide Voyage:

The Hawaii part of the World Wide Exploration

The Hawaii part of the World Wide Exploration

And the worldwide plan(s):

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

I spent about an hour aboard the Hokulea this afternoon and look forward to following them on their worldwide tour.

The decks were so hot, that they had to keep splashing water on the deck to keep our feet from burning

The decks were so hot, that they had to keep splashing water on the deck to keep our feet from burning

Here are some quick facts about the Hokule’a and the Hikanalia:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The public is invited to send off the vessels tomorrow, however, they technically won’t leave for a few more days however, this will be the main chance for the public to check things out.  A community potluck is being provided by the folks of the Keaukaha Community and the Canoe Clubs that are in Hilo.

Hokulea in Hilo

Just an overexposed picture I kind of like

Just an overexposed picture I kind of like

 

Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage Public Celebration – Hōkūle‘a in Hilo

The Polynesian Voyaging Society Canoe “Hōkūle‘a” is currently in Hilo at Palekai, Radio Bay in Keaukaha.

Her sister canoe, the  Hikianalia will depart Kawaihae today at 5 PM and be in Hilo sometime Saturday.  All events are subject to change, of course, mostly due to the weather.

On Sunday, June 9th, a big community event in Hilo will include the Hōkūle‘a launch ceremonies.  Everyone is invited.

Hokulea in Hilo

It is being hosted by Keaukaha community, ‘Ohana Wa‘a and the canoe clubs there.  There will be guest speakers that include Mayor Kenoi, a couple of the Ocean Elders and others.

The window of opportunity for the actual departure is between June 10-14, but the official ceremonies will take place Sunday.

According to Hawaii News Now:

…There are 22 legs planned for Hokulea’s voyage around the world, but the first and final are both right here at home.  Crew members say it’s about honoring our community and showing Hawaii’s people their gratitude.

Over the next four years, Hokule’a and her escort boat and sister canoe, Hikianalia, will travel to 28 countries and stop at 85 international ports – sailing more than 45,000 nautical miles around the world.

“We want to go. It’s time to go,” said navigator Nainoa Thompson, Hokulea’s Captain.

But before they set sail for international waters, Hokule’a and Hikianalia will spend the first five months of their journey right here at home.

“Around Hawai’i sail is the first leg.  It’s only a thousand miles, probably the shortest of all of them, but it’s the most important,” described Thompson, before adding this portion of the voyage is crucial to making sure all 250 crew members are trained and prepared before heading to the South Pacific next May.

“In many ways we could go to Tahiti right now.  We’re safe enough to do that, but I think this engagement with home is a crucial piece to earning that voyage,” explained Thompson.

“Malama Honua”, or “Care for the Earth”, defines the worldwide voyage’s mission and crew members say that starts here in the islands with “Malama Hawai’i”…

Worldwide Voyage Receives First Major Sponsorship

Hawaiian Airlines Pledges Crew Travel and Cargo Transportation

In a significant display of support for the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Worldwide Voyage, Hawaiian Airlines has pledged to provide air transportation for PVS crew and cargo throughout Hawaiian’s route network for the duration of the four-year voyage.

Hikianalia on its way to Hawaii last year.

Hikianalia on its way to Hawaii last year.

Under a sponsorship contract signed this week, Hawaiian Airlines will provide 32 million air miles for crew travel, as well as cargo support for supplies needed as the sailing canoes Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia travel to international ports throughout the Pacific.  The value of the sponsorship is estimated to be $1 million.

Hawaiian will be the lead sponsor of the voyage, which will be known as “The Worldwide Voyage Sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines.”

The Dalai Lama blessed the Hokulea at Kualoa Park last year.  Photo courtesy of Pillars of Peace

The Dalai Lama blessed the Hōkūle‘a at Kualoa Park last year. Photo courtesy of Pillars of Peace

“We are deeply appreciative of Hawaiian’s extraordinary commitment to our mission to inspire young people throughout the world to care for and sustain our planet, and to coexist in peace and compassion,” said navigator Nainoa Thompson, PVS president.  “Sailing Hōkūle‘a has taught us the importance of understanding and connecting with our natural resources.  She is a reminder to us all of the need to celebrate and protect the natural and cultural treasures of Island Earth.”

“The Worldwide Voyage honors a legacy of connecting islands throughout the Pacific that Polynesian navigators created centuries ago. It is our privilege as modern-day navigators and beneficiaries of that legacy to support this voyage and its message of sustainability and resource protection,” said Mark Dunkerley, Hawaiian Airlines’ president and CEO.

The Worldwide Voyage Sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines will begin in June 2013 with a series of voyages throughout the Hawaiian archipelago, and continue through 2017 with visits to more than 60 ports in more than 20 countries.

The Hōkūle‘a being worked on. Picture courtesy of Pillars of Peace

The Hōkūle‘a being worked on. Picture courtesy of Pillars of Peace

The 48-month voyage involves more than 400 crewmembers from 16 countries.  This includes educators and scientists who will be using the voyage to research ocean wellness, using Native Hawaiian and western science research methods, and to create voyaging-based curriculum to be disseminated in as many Hawai‘i schools as possible, including Mālama Honua, a newly created charter school affiliated with the voyage.  Hikianalia, the solar- and wind-powered support and sister vessel to Hōkūle‘a, will be a platform for marine science, documentation, education outreach, communication and teacher training, while Hōkūle‘a will continue to be a platform for indigenous knowledge, experiential learning and sustainability.

PVS expects to have approximately 5,000 of Hawai‘i’s school children physically on the canoes during the first year of the Worldwide Voyage, and more than 100,000 Hawai’i students and teachers on board PVS’s third canoe, the website http://hokulea.org, throughout the four-year voyage as part of their curriculum.  Students from several public and private schools in Hawai‘i have already been involved in preparing for the voyage by assisting in dry docks (restoration and repair work) for Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia, studying the sail plan, and participating in crew training and classroom work on the wa‘a.

Photo courtesy of Pillars of Peace

The blessing of the Hokulea. Photo courtesy of Pillars of Peace

“The involvement of our youth has been one of the most powerful aspects of planning for this voyage,” remarked Thompson.  “We can count on this next generation of voyagers to perpetuate the values and practices that will guide our planet toward good health.”

Commented Dunkerley: “The students who will be touched by this voyage, either by participating in it or by learning from the science-based curriculum it will produce, are the future workforce of Hawaiian Airlines.  So it is fitting that Hawai‘i-based companies such as ours support this journey.”