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3.2 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes East Hawaii Early in the Morning

Magnitude 3.2
Date-Time
Location 19.409°N, 155.321°W
Depth 4.2 km (2.6 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 10 km (6 miles) WSW (243°) from Volcano, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) WSW (251°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 24 km (15 miles) SW (232°) from Mountain View, HI
  • 41 km (26 miles) SW (217°) from Hilo, HI
  • 336 km (209 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Parameters Nph= 14, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.05 sec, Gp=130°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60375051

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Registered in Waimea

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.777°N, 155.573°W
Depth 16.4 km (10.2 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 29 km (18 miles) SE (128°) from Waikoloa Village, HI
  • 29 km (18 miles) SSE (159°) from Waimea, HI
  • 35 km (22 miles) ESE (119°) from Puako, HI
  • 52 km (32 miles) W (279°) from Hilo, HI
  • 290 km (180 miles) SE (126°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 1.1 km (0.7 miles)
Parameters Nph= 43, Dmin=12 km, Rmss=0.09 sec, Gp= 86°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60366716

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Volcano Area of Big Island This Afternoon

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.387°N, 155.246°W
Depth 3.3 km (2.1 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 7 km (4 miles) S (189°) from Volcano, HI
  • 15 km (10 miles) SW (232°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SW (231°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 39 km (24 miles) SSW (205°) from Hilo, HI
  • 344 km (214 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.3 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 30, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.09 sec, Gp=104°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60362376

Big Island Rumbling… Earthquakes Increasing?

Two earthquakes registering 3.0 or over were recorded recently today on the Big Island:

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
Location 19.975°N, 155.554°W
Depth 15 km (9.3 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 13 km (8 miles) ESE (114°) from Waimea, HI
  • 15 km (9 miles) SW (220°) from Honokaa, HI
  • 16 km (10 miles) S (174°) from Kukuihaele, HI
  • 57 km (36 miles) WNW (302°) from Hilo, HI
  • 279 km (173 miles) ESE (122°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.8 km (0.5 miles); depth +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Parameters Nph= 49, Dmin=16 km, Rmss=0.1 sec, Gp=166°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60359176

The most recent one:

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.244°N, 155.518°W
Depth 33.6 km (20.9 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 6 km (4 miles) NW (318°) from Pahala, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) NNE (20°) from Naalehu, HI
  • 30 km (19 miles) ENE (60°) from Hawaiian Ocean View, HI
  • 68 km (42 miles) SW (221°) from Hilo, HI
  • 333 km (207 miles) SE (133°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 1.2 km (0.7 miles)
Parameters Nph= 54, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.08 sec, Gp=115°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60359246

3.6 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Volcano Area of Big Island

Magnitude 3.6
Date-Time
Location 19.344°N, 155.283°W
Depth 1 km (~0.6 mile)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 13 km (8 miles) SSW (203°) from Volcano, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) SW (228°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 25 km (16 miles) SW (228°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 45 km (28 miles) SSW (207°) from Hilo, HI
  • 344 km (214 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 54, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.13 sec, Gp= 68°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60355866

Second 3.5 Magnitude Earthquake Hits the Big Island Today

Well this is the second 3.5 Magnitude Earthquake reported here on the Big Island in the last 12 hours:

Magnitude 3.5
Date-Time
Location 19.340°N, 155.283°W
Depth 1 km (~0.6 mile)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 13 km (8 miles) SSW (202°) from Volcano, HI
  • 22 km (14 miles) SW (227°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 25 km (16 miles) SW (227°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 46 km (28 miles) SSW (207°) from Hilo, HI
  • 344 km (214 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 38, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.09 sec, Gp= 72°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60355486

3.3 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes the Big Island Tonight

Magnitude 3.3
Date-Time
Location 19.299°N, 155.213°W
Depth 9.4 km (5.8 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 17 km (10 miles) S (172°) from Volcano, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) SSW (204°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 24 km (15 miles) SSW (207°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 42 km (26 miles) SW (229°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 47 km (29 miles) SSW (196°) from Hilo, HI
  • 352 km (219 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 0.3 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 67, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.12 sec, Gp=112°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60351806

3.0 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Volcano Area of the Big Island… No Tsunami Threat Reported

UPDATE this has been downgraded to a 2.8

A 3.0 magnitude earthquake just shook the Volcano are of the Big Island:

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
  • Friday, May 18, 2012 at 03:48:42 PM at epicenter
Location 19.428°N, 155.274°W
Depth 1.4 km (~0.9 mile)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 5 km (3 miles) WSW (239°) from Volcano, HI
  • 16 km (10 miles) WSW (252°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SW (228°) from Mountain View, HI
  • 37 km (23 miles) SSW (213°) from Hilo, HI
  • 338 km (210 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles)
Parameters Nph= 27, Dmin=1 km, Rmss=0.1 sec, Gp= 97°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60345346

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Earns National Award for Monitoring Air Quality

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has earned the national Safety and Health Group Award from the National Park Service for its work in monitoring air quality within the park, and communicating the
information to the public and employees.

NPS photo of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Ecologist David Benitez checking the SO2 monitor at Steam Vents

In 2011, the park’s air quality (AQ) team installed seven stations that measure at 15-minute intervals sulfur dioxide (SO2) and volcanic particulates downwind of Kīlauea’s two active locations at Halema‘uma‘u and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The findings are monitored and shared in real time at http://www.hawaiiso2network.com/.

The site offers a multitude of data, including AQ findings, weather conditions and wind direction, links to other AQ sites for the state and Hawai‘i Island, and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webcams and updates.

The team also established an AQ Policy to guide corrective actions within the park, including temporary area closures as necessary to protect visitors and staff from dangerous fumes. In addition, mobile hand-held monitors, or gas badges, are used by field crews.

“Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has the highest average SO2 levels in the National Park Service due to ongoing volcanic activity, a natural event,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “Our air quality program is a model for naturally occurring SO2 emission management nationally. With a solid
communications system in place, visitors can safely visit our fascinating World Heritage Site on Hawai‘i Island,” she said.

Park visitors, staff and the public are also alerted by mobile electronic road signs that are programmed to convey real time AQ conditions. Monitors displaying the AQ website are also available for the public and staff inside the Kīlauea Visitor Center, on the visitor center lānai (accessible 24 hours a day), and at Jaggar Museum.

The AQ team is comprised of staff from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Air Resources Division of the National Park Service, the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Registered in the Waikoloa Area of the Big Island Today

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.841°N, 155.685°W
Depth 37.7 km (23.4 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 16 km (10 miles) SE (135°) from Waikoloa Village, HI
  • 20 km (13 miles) S (184°) from Waimea, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) ESE (118°) from Puako, HI
  • 64 km (40 miles) WNW (284°) from Hilo, HI
  • 276 km (172 miles) SE (126°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.5 km (0.3 miles); depth +/- 1.4 km (0.9 miles)
Parameters Nph= 66, Dmin=3 km, Rmss=0.08 sec, Gp=104°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60336916

Free Book – “The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory – A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes”

2012 marks 100 years of continuous volcano and earthquake monitoring at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.  As part of HVO’s centennial celebration, the USGS has published a new general-interest publication, “The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory—A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes.”

Click for a copy of your free book

This 62-page, full-color booklet recounts the founding of HVO, the first volcano observatory in the United States, and its pioneering achievements in the science of volcano monitoring over the past century. Written in a reader-friendly style, the booklet will appeal to anyone interested in earth science and volcanoes.

“Born from cracks opened by earthquakes and fed by fountains of hot molten lava, the volcanoes of Hawaiʻi rise as much as 30,000 feet above the floor of the surrounding deep sea, making them the largest volcanoes on the planet,” said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. “It is a marvelous detective story to read how scientists have used data collected over the last 100 years to understand volcanic history extending back a million years, as well as what the volcanic future might be.”

HVO, perched on the rim of Kîlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, closely monitors the volcanic and seismic activity of Kîlauea and Mauna Loa, two of the most active volcanoes in the world, and other Hawaiian volcanoes. HVO’s monitoring data, eruption forecasts, and timely warnings of potential hazards help protect the public—a key mission of HVO since 1912, when geologist Thomas A. Jaggar, founded the observatory.

The new booklet describes the development of the tools and techniques used by HVO to monitor Hawai‘i’s volcanic and seismic activity over the past 100 years. Whereas Jaggar had only a few early seismometers to track eruptions and earthquakes, HVO scientists today can access huge amounts of digital data from a dense network of seismometers, tiltmeters, GPS receivers, gas sensors, and other technologically advanced monitoring instruments.

Archival photos in “The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory” portray dramatic changes in Kilauea’s landscape, such as the formation of a 400-foot-deep lava lake filling the bottom of Kîlauea Iki Crater in 1959, the growth of a 370-foot-high lava shield during the 1969–1974 Mauna Ulu eruption, and the explosive eruptions of Halema’uma’u Crater in 1924 that increased its diameter from 1,200 feet to more than 3,000 feet. A timeline in the book features archival photographs from significant eruptions and earthquakes that have affected Hawai‘i residents since 1912.

HVO scientists have made great strides in understanding how Hawaiian volcanoes work, and the booklet summarizes their key discoveries during the past 100 years. Some of these include the relationship of earthquakes and volcanic tremors to volcanic activity, the precursory signals of an eruption, the evolution and internal structure of Hawaiian volcanoes, the dynamics of lava flows and lava lakes, and the formation of summit calderas.

The story concludes with a look toward the next 100 years, and the challenges and opportunities that will keep the next generation of HVO scientists busy.

USGS General Information Product 135, “The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory—A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes,” by Janet L. Babb, James P. Kauahikaua, and Robert I. Tilling, is available free online (PDF).

A limited number of free printed booklets can be ordered (for a $5.00 handling fee) from the USGS online Store, or by writing to USGS Information Services, Box 25286, 
Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225; telephone: 1-888-ASK-USGS; e-mail: infoservices@usgs.gov.

3.0 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Southern Part of the Big Island

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
Location 18.941°N, 155.478°W
Depth 37.1 km (23.1 miles)
Region HAWAII REGION, HAWAII
Distances
  • 18 km (11 miles) SE (140°) from Naalehu, HI
  • 29 km (18 miles) S (180°) from Pahala, HI
  • 36 km (22 miles) ESE (121°) from Hawaiian Ocean View, HI
  • 90 km (56 miles) SW (222°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 94 km (59 miles) SSW (206°) from Hilo, HI
  • 360 km (224 miles) SE (137°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 1.3 km (0.8 miles); depth +/- 1.5 km (0.9 miles)
Parameters Nph= 65, Dmin=20 km, Rmss=0.09 sec, Gp=238°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60329266

3.7 Magntitude Earthquake Shakes the Big Island

Magnitude 3.7
Date-Time
Location 19.688°N, 156.370°W
Depth 33.4 km (20.8 miles)
Region HAWAII REGION, HAWAII
Distances
  • 38 km (24 miles) W (264°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 40 km (25 miles) W (278°) from Kailua, HI
  • 43 km (27 miles) W (281°) from Holualoa, HI
  • 134 km (84 miles) W (269°) from Hilo, HI
  • 236 km (146 miles) SE (140°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 2 km (1.2 miles); depth +/- 2 km (1.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 49, Dmin=37 km, Rmss=0.14 sec, Gp=266°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60325241

Pele Rocking!!! 4.1 Magnitude Earthquake Rocks Volcano Area Tonight

Magnitude 4.1
Date-Time
  • Friday, February 24, 2012 at 07:02:24 UTC
  • Thursday, February 23, 2012 at 09:02:24 PM at epicenter
Location 19.436°N, 155.313°W
Depth 5.2 km (3.2 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 8 km (5 miles) W (259°) from Volcano, HI
  • 20 km (12 miles) WSW (258°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) WSW (237°) from Mountain View, HI
  • 38 km (24 miles) SW (218°) from Hilo, HI
  • 335 km (208 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.3 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Parameters Nph= 71, Dmin=3 km, Rmss=0.11 sec, Gp= 50°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60313901

Public Invited to Learn More About VOG and Volcanic Gases

The public is invited to learn about Kīlauea’s volcanic gases and vog (volcanic air pollution) in an “After Dark in the Park” program at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Tues., Jan. 31, at 7 p.m.

Sulfur dioxide gas emissions from the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō ‘ō on Kīlauea’s east rift zone (above) and the vent within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at Kīlauea’s summit create volcanic pollution that affects the air quality of downwind communities.  Here, an HVO gas geochemist measures Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō gas emissions using an instrument that detects gas compositions on the basis of absorbed infrared light

U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias will update information on Kīlauea Volcano’s gas emissions and associated environmental impacts.  Their presentation will be at the park’s Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Park entrance fees apply.

Sutton and Elias will discuss how vog forms from sulfur dioxide gas emitted from Kīlauea’s east rift and summit vents.  They will also provide an overview of existing resources that residents can consult to better deal with this notable aspect of the volcano’s ongoing eruptions. After their talk, an optional “gas tasting” session will be offered, during which attendees can safely learn to recognize individual volcanic gases by smell.

Kīlauea has been releasing large amounts of potentially hazardous volcanic gases for nearly three decades—since the beginning of the volcano’s east rift zone eruption in 1983.  In March 2008, Kīlauea gas emissions increased further when a new vent opened in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of the volcano.

Average sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions from Kīlauea’s east rift zone vent declined significantly in 2010 but jumped briefly during the Kamoamoa eruption in March 2011.  Kīlauea summit SO2 emissions, overall, have remained high since the opening of the Halema‘uma‘u Overlook Vent in 2008.

At of the end of 2011, the combined emission rate for these two sources was about half of what it was during 2008-2009. This lower combined rate has been comparatively good news for downwind residents and visitors of Hawai‘i Island.

This presentation is one of many programs offered by HVO during Hawai‘i Island’s Volcano Awareness Month in January 2012.  For details about this After Dark in the Park program, please call 808-985-6011.  More information about Volcano Awareness Month is posted on the HVO website at hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

NASA’s G-III Finishes Hawaii Volcano Radar Study

NASA’s Gulfstream III environmental research aircraft returned to the Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif., Jan. 14 following an eight-day deployment to Hawaii. Five science flights totaling more than 31 hours allowed scientists to collect radar imaging data about volcanoes intended to help scientists better understand processes occurring under Earth’s surface.

This ground-level photo of the Halema’uma’u Crater of the Kilauea volcano was taken by a member of the NASA JPL / Dryden research team during a day off from the radar imaging missions. Although lava is not flowing from this crater, smoke and steam continue to rise into the air above the caldera. Lava continues to flow from Kilauea's east rift zone, the most active part of Kilauea, as it has since 1983. (NASA / Troy Asher)

The airborne study was conducted from an altitude of 40,000 feet using the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, or UAVSAR, developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory mounted in a pod under the aircraft. The study focused on the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the state’s most active volcano, although science data flight lines were flown over nearby volcanoes including Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Hualalai and Kohala.

NASA research pilot Troy Asher reported that good weather and the reliability of the aircraft and the radar equipment enabled the research team to accomplish virtually all of their planned science data collection flight lines.

“We had one day off, and used that time to do a little touring on the island to see firsthand some of what we were observing from 40,000 feet,” he added.

The UAVSAR uses a technique called interferometry that sends pulses of microwave energy from the sensor on the aircraft to the ground to detect and measure very subtle deformations in Earth’s surface. The radar data collected during the mission will be analyzed over the next few weeks to determine if significant ground movement or deformation is occurring in the active volcanic areas.

The UAVSAR’s first data acquisition over this region took place in January 2010. Assisted by a Platform Precision Autopilot designed by engineers at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center, flights over the volcano were repeated in May 2011. Those two sets of observations successfully imaged the surface deformation caused by the March 2011 fissure eruption in Kilauea’s east rift zone.

3.7 Magnitude Earthquake Hits the Big Island’s Volcano Area

Magnitude 3.7
Date-Time
Location 19.368°N, 155.381°W
Depth 46.5 km (28.9 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 18 km (11 miles) WSW (239°) from Volcano, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) NNE (29°) from Pahala, HI
  • 29 km (18 miles) WSW (246°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 49 km (30 miles) SW (220°) from Hilo, HI
  • 334 km (208 miles) SE (130°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 5.7 km (3.5 miles); depth +/- 2.8 km (1.7 miles)
Parameters Nph= 24, Dmin=4 km, Rmss=0.73 sec, Gp=191°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60299041

The History of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Explained – Volcano Awareness Month

The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, which celebrates its 100th anniversary this month, is the topic of an “After Dark in the Park” program in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Tues., Jan. 17 at 7 p.m.

U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Jim Kauahikaua will talk about the founding of the observatory in 1912, as well as HVO’s achievements monitoring Hawaiian volcanoes and earthquakes during the past century.  His presentation will be held at the park’s Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Park entrance fees apply.

Thomas A. Jaggar founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and served as its Director until 1940. Shown here in 1925, Jaggar is at work in HVO’s first building, which, at the time, was located on the northeast rim of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, near the present-day Volcano House hotel. Today’s HVO Scientist-in-Charge presents the story of America’s first volcano observatory in a talk at the Kīlauea Visitor Center at 7 p.m. on Jan. 17.

The founding of HVO, America’s first volcano observatory, is attributed to Thomas A. Jaggar in the year 1912. But the study and monitoring of Kīlauea actually began in 1911 with Frank Perret, who came to Hawai‘i at the request of Jaggar.

Jaggar arrived at Kīlauea on Jan. 17, 1912, and immediately set forth monitoring earthquakes and changes in the shape of Kīlauea with the best tools available to him at the time: a few seismometers, some meteorological equipment, and a surveyor’s transit.

One hundred years later, HVO scientists in 2012 analyze data collected from more than 100 field stations, each of which consists of one to five instruments, including seismic, deformation, volcanic-gas, geologic, and other monitoring tools.  These stations transmit data to HVO around the clock, with a single instrument sending as much as 60 terabytes of data each year—more information than Jaggar could have imagined possible.

Kauahikaua will tell the story of HVO’s first 100 years, the various buildings and locations HVO has occupied, the legacy of HVO’s leaders, the evolution of volcano monitoring tools and techniques, and significant discoveries along the way.

HVO’s entire history is a lot of information to compress into a 45-minute presentation, but Kauahikaua says not to worry.  He is coauthor of a new USGS General Interest Product, “The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory—A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes.”  One hundred paper copies of the publication will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis to attendees at his talk.

The public is also invited to attend an Open House of the observatory in celebration of HVO’s centennial milestone.

“HVO is not ordinarily open to the public, so our Open House on Jan. 21 is a special opportunity for island residents and visitors to see how we monitor Hawaiian volcanoes and to interact with HVO scientists,” said Kauahikaua.

Kauahikaua’s presentation is one of many programs offered by HVO during Volcano Awareness Month and in celebration of HVO’s 100th anniversary in January 2012.  For details about this After Dark in the Park program, please call 808-985-6011.  More information about Volcano Awareness Month is posted on the HVO website at hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

Current Status of Hawaii Island’s Volcanoes Presented in Kona

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s 1912–2012 Centennial—100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes

The current status of Hawai‘i Island’s active volcanoes and how they are monitored will be the topic of a Volcano Awareness Month program in Kailua-Kona on Wednesday, January 11.

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory uses a variety of ground- and satellite-based techniques to monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes. Here, an HVO scientist sets up a portable GPS receiver to track surface changes during an island-wide survey of Hawai‘i’s volcanoes.

Mike Poland, a volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will talk about Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, and Mauna Kea in an informative and engaging presentation in the Kealakehe High School Cafeteria, 74-5000 Puuhulihuli Street, in Kailua.  A campus map is available online.  His talk, which is free and open to the public, begins at 7:00 p.m.

Hawai‘i Island is home to five volcanoes, four of which have erupted within the past 10,000 years.  Poland will provide updates on the status of these “active” volcanoes, with particular focus on recent events on Kīlauea, which has been erupting almost continuously since 1983.  He will also talk about how HVO scientists monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes.

According to Poland, Hawaiian volcanoes are among the best-monitored volcanoes in the world.  “Since its founding in 1912, HVO has been at the forefront of developing, testing, and implementing cutting-edge monitoring tools and techniques,” he said.  Poland’s presentation will include an overview of the state-of-the-art techniques now used by HVO to track magma movement within the currently erupting Kīlauea and to watch for changes within the presently-quiet Mauna Loa, Hualālai, and Mauna Kea.

This presentation is one of many programs offered by HVO during Hawai‘i Island’s third annual Volcano Awareness Month (January 2012), and in celebration of HVO’s 100th anniversary. For more information about Poland’s talk, and other HVO Centennial and Volcano Awareness Month events, please visit the HVO website or call (808) 967-8844.

Kilauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone Eruption: 29 Years and Counting

Jan. 3, 2012 marks the 29th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption. This eruption, particularly events that occurred during the past year, will be the topic of an “After Dark in the Park” program in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Tues., Jan. 3.

On Mar. 6, 2011, a spectacular fissure eruption between Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and Nāpau Crater on Kīlauea’s east rift zone produced lava flows that poured into a pre-existing ground crack and advanced through an ‘ōhi‘a forest. For scale, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists (lower right) can be seen walking toward the flow. USGS photo by Tim Orr

Tim Orr, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review the eruption, focusing on highlights from Kīlauea’s 2011 activity. The program begins at 7 p.m. at the park’s Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Park entrance fees apply.

The eruption began just after midnight on Jan. 3, 1983, with lava erupting to the surface along several fissures.  By June 1983, the eruption was focused at a single vent. Over the next three years, lava fountains up to 1,500 feet high roared from the vent 44 times, building a cinder-and-spatter cone named Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

In July 1986, the eruption shifted to Kupaianaha, a new vent farther down the east rift zone. Lava poured from this vent nearly continuously for almost six years, burning and burying Kīlauea’s south flank, including the communities of Kapa‘ahu and Kalapana, in 1986 and 1990, respectively.

Early in 1992, the eruption returned to vents on the flanks of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Over the next 18 years, lava flowed down the slopes of Kīlauea, inundating areas within and outside of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National park and often reaching the sea.

During the past year, Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption has included two spectacular fissure eruptions, a dramatic outbreak of lava from the west flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, and, on Dec. 9, 2011, a new ocean entry USGS scientists named West Ka‘ili‘ili—the first ocean entry within the boundaries of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park since 2009.

Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have buried 48 square miles of public and private land, destroying vast tracts of native forest, nine miles of highway, and 213 structures, including homes, a church, and the Waha‘ula Visitor Center in the park.

While Kīlauea’s current east rift zone eruption has been its most destructive event in recent history, the eruption has also been constructive. Molten lava flowing into the sea has added about 500 acres of
new land to Hawai‘i Island.

This presentation is one of many talks, guided hikes, and other programs offered by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park as part of Hawai‘i Island’s third annual Volcano Awareness Month in January. For more information about this talk, please call 808-985-6011.

For a complete schedule of Volcano Awareness Month events, please visit the HVO Web site at www.hvo.wr.usgs.gov or call (808) 967-8844.