Update to Crater Rim Drive Lane Closure

The westbound lane fronting Steam Vents will be closed for up to 10 weeks, Monday through Thursday, while crews replace a deteriorated water main.

Lava “waterfall” from the Mauna Ulu eruption, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. C. 1970

Lava “waterfall” from the Mauna Ulu eruption, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. C. 1970

Weekly work will be completed during four 10-hour days, instead of five eight-hour days. There will be no construction work or lane closure in the area on Fridays.

Traffic controllers will alternate traffic flow through the single open lane, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. Wait times to pass the construction area should not exceed 15 minutes.

Both lanes will be open to traffic when there is no active construction.

The project will replace approximately 3,000 feet of failing pipe that supplies water to Jaggar Museum and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

 

HVO Update – Kilauea Ocean Entry Near Kupapaʻu Point Hangs On – Lava Lake in Halemaʻumaʻu at Relatively High Level

The ocean entry east of the National Park boundary near Kupapaʻu Point remains weak, with a wispy plume, as seen in this photo looking southwest along the coast.

hvo

Photos from Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory

The main entry point of the Kupapaʻu ocean entry comprises a few small streams of lava, seen here cascading into the water.

HVO

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow continues to invade the forest line north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

HVO

Poor weather prevented good views but made for an eerie scene.

The lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu was 35 m (115 ft) below the floor of the crater yesterday morning.

HVO

The lake is about 220 m (720 ft) long and 160 m (525 ft) wide.

A thin gas plume permitted a decent view of the south wall of the pit holding the lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu.  Yesterday the lava lake was not spattering at its usual point near the left side of the lake in this view.

This wall is overhung by up to 15 m.

This wall is overhung by up to 15 m.

Instead, the lava lake was spattering at points on the west and northwest side of the lake. If the lake continues to rise, pieces of this overhang may collapse (note the cracks at lower right marking planes of weakness).

This photo shows the spattering on the lake's northwest side. The pit wall to the right overhangs the lake by about 10 m (33 ft)

This photo shows the spattering on the lake’s northwest side. The pit wall to the right overhangs the lake by about 10 m (33 ft)

 

Saving Lives Worldwide by Training International Volcano Scientists

Scientists and technicians who work at volcano observatories in nine countries are visiting Mount St. Helens and the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center’s Cascades Volcano Observatory this week to learn techniques for monitoring active volcanoes. Organized by the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at the University of Hawaiʻi, Hilo, with support from the VSC-managed joint USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, the annual program has been training foreign scientists for 22 years. This year’s class includes volcano scientists from Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Canada, Indonesia, Italy, and Papua New Guinea.

International members of the 2013 CSAV volcano monitoring summer training class pose at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory sign.

International members of the 2013 CSAV volcano monitoring summer training class pose at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory sign.

The International Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring is designed to assist other nations in attaining self-sufficiency in monitoring volcanoes and reducing the risks from eruptions. Through in-class instruction at two USGS volcano observatories, and field exercises in Hawaiʻi and at Mount St. Helens, U.S. scientists are providing training on monitoring methods, data analysis and interpretation, and volcanic hazard assessment, and participants are taught about the use and maintenance of volcano monitoring instruments. Additionally, participants learn about focusing on forecasting and rapid response during volcanic crises, and how to work with governing officials and the news media to save lives and property.

Mikhail Herry from Papua New Guinea, (wearing a CSAV shirt) watches as McChesney demonstrates how to test a battery in the field

Mikhail Herry from Papua New Guinea, (wearing a CSAV shirt) watches as McChesney demonstrates how to test a battery in the field

“Science diplomacy, building friendships, and collaboration between the U.S. and other nations through joint scientific work and training can ultimately save many thousands of lives in nations with active volcanoes,” said USGS geologist and VDAP chief, John Pallister.  “Avoiding a major volcano disaster through mitigation and advance training is not only better for humanitarian reasons, but it can also be more cost effective than providing foreign aid after a disaster.”

The annual summer course usually takes place only on the Island of Hawaiʻi at the University in Hilo, the USGS VSC Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, and in the field on the slopes of Kīlauea Volcano. This year, in an added component to the course, students are visiting the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Wash. and doing field work at Mount St. Helens to give them the experience of working with a geologically different (more explosive) type of volcano.

“Bringing the class to CVO and including field sessions at Mount St. Helens to complement the Hawaiʻi experience takes advantage of two superb natural laboratories for the study of active volcanism,” said Don Thomas, director of CSAV. “Mount St. Helens has a strong legacy and reputation worldwide as a teaching volcano.” One of this year’s participants noted that he is among the second generation from his country to visit and study modern monitoring techniques at Mount St. Helens.

USGS volcano scientist, Andy Lockhart discusses telemetry options with Syegi Kunrat of Indonesia

USGS volcano scientist, Andy Lockhart discusses telemetry options with Syegi Kunrat of Indonesia

Providing critical training to international scientists began at HVO, leading to the creation of CSAV to continue the legacy. Since 1990 roughly 200 scientists and civil workers from 25 countries have received training in volcano monitoring methods through CSAV. HVO continues to provide instructors and field experiences for the courses, and VDAP has a long-term partnership with CSAV, providing instructors and co-sponsoring participants from developing countries. VDAP scientists are based at CVO in Washington, so with CSAV course instructors visiting CVO for the first time, there is an opportunity for professional scientific exchanges among researchers who don’t often have a chance to collaborate face to face. For many of the students, attending this training is a rare chance to share their experiences and challenges with other participants from around the world.

VDAP is supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development, Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance. Since 1985, VDAP has worked to reduce fatalities and economic losses in countries experiencing volcano emergencies. At the request of host countries, and working through USAID, an experienced team of USGS scientists can rapidly respond to developing volcanic crises worldwide, and provide consultation, assistance with forecasting, remote sensing data, and monitoring equipment. VDAP teams work in the background, providing support to their hosts who are the responsible parties for hazard communication. Between crises, VDAP scientists work with international partners to build and improve volcano-monitoring systems and to conduct joint activities, including workshops and on-the-job training, to reduce volcanic risk and improve understanding of volcanic hazards.

 

3.4 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes the Fern Forest Area of the Big Island

earthquake

Magnitude 3.3 3.4 (UPGRADED)
Date-Time
Location 19.349°N, 155.071°W
Depth 8.4 km (5.2 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 15 km (9 miles) SSE (155°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 17 km (10 miles) SSE (167°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 18 km (11 miles) S (174°) from Fern Acres, HI
  • 28 km (17 miles) SW (218°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 40 km (25 miles) S (178°) from Hilo, HI
  • 361 km (224 miles) SE (127°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.7 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 55, Dmin=6 km, Rmss=0.11 sec, Gp=169°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60496401

Lava Continues to Enter the Ocean at Kupapa`u Point – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Report

After a 12 km (7.5 mile) journey from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone through a lava tube, lava pours into the ocean in narrow streams at one of the eastern entry points.

HVO5

Another entry point has two larger lava streams entering the water. The lava fragments due to cooling and disruption by the battering surf, and some of these pieces float on the water’s surface in front of the entry point (see lower left portion of photo).

HVO6

Over the past week this spatter cone on the floor of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater has been the source of several large, but brief, lava flows on the crater floor. Today, the cone was producing pulsating gas jetting sounds.

HVO7

3.2 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes the Big Island Early This Morning

earthquake

Magnitude 3.0 3.2 (UPGRADED)
Date-Time
Location 19.602°N, 155.084°W
Depth 14.1 km (8.8 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 2 km (1 miles) NW (313°) from Kurtistown, HI
  • 5 km (3 miles) WSW (245°) from Keaau, HI
  • 7 km (4 miles) NNW (334°) from Hawaiian Acres, HI
  • 11 km (7 miles) S (179°) from Hilo, HI
  • 343 km (213 miles) ESE (123°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.5 km (0.3 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 51, Dmin=11 km, Rmss=0.11 sec, Gp=133°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60492776

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Update – Kahaualeʻa Flow Front Stalls, New Overflow in Puʻu ʻŌʻō

Breakouts have diminished over the past few days on the Kahaualeʻa flow (heading northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō), and the flow front has not advanced significantly since April 8.

Compare Saturday’s thermal image with that from the April 8 overflight. 

Thermal Image

During Saturday’s flight, there were no active breakouts at the flow front.

Breakouts have diminished over the past few days on the Kahaualeʻa flow (heading northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō), and the flow front has not advanced significantly since April 8. Compare today’s thermal image with that from the April 8 overflight. During Saturday’s flight, there were no active breakouts at the flow front.

A vigorous flow was erupted on the floor of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater starting early this morning from a cone near the north rim, but a smaller flow was also erupted from a spatter cone near the south rim around noon. This photo captures a burst of spatter from the southern cone as the small flow was erupted.

Lava Flow 2

Lava erupted this morning from the cone near the north rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, with a small portion of the flow emptying out onto the east spillway. This new flow brings the floor of the crater slightly closer to the north crater rim.

Lava Flow 3

This short Quicktime movie shows spattering from a cone near the south rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater as a short lava flow is erupted.

 

 

The Latest Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Update

The latest update from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory:

This photo looks northeast and shows Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. Recent activity has been focused around a few spatter cones on the crater floor.

HVO1

At the far edge of the crater, a small lava pond has been active and has been the source of flows extending northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Those flows are visible at the top-center of the photo. Just below the horizon two small sources of smoke mark where the flow front is burning lichen and moss covering older ʻaʻā flows.

A closer look at the flow extending northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone is at the right edge of the photo, and view is towards the northeast.

hvo2

In the foreground, two sources of fume mark the path of the lava tube supplying lava to the flow front. In the top-left, a few sources of smoke mark where the flow margin is burning moss and lichen on older flows. Today, the flow front was just over 4 km (2.5 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

South winds permitted clear views into the south portion of the Overlook crater, which is often obscured by thick fume.

HVO3

The bright orange area is the location where lava at the surface of the lake sinks back into the system, with spattering and degassing common in this area. A broad ledge of recently deposited lava occupies much of the south portion of the crater.

Spattering is common in the area where lava sinks back into the system, and this photo shows these processes are occurring in a small grotto.

hvo4

In the right portion of the photo, the ledge occupying much of the south part of the Overlook crater is visible. Parallel lines along the front face of this ledge might appear at first glance to be layering within the ledge, but are actually thin deposits of lava that mark recent levels of the lava lake, much like bathtub rings.

 

Satellite Image Shows Active Lava Breakouts on Flow Field

This image was captured on Wednesday, February 13, by the Advanced Land Imager sensor aboard NASA’s Earth Observing 1 satellite.

Satellite image courtesy of Hawaii Volcano Observatory

Satellite image courtesy of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures, and show active or very recently active lava flows. The image shows three general areas of active breakouts.

  • First, flows have been active for several weeks northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and have reached about 2 km (1.2 miles) from the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater rim.
  • Second, breakouts have been active above the pali, about 5 km (3.1 miles) southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.
  • Third, several scattered breakouts have been active on the coastal plain, with several patches very close to the shoreline above the active ocean entry. Satellite images such as this help fill in observational gaps between field visits.

Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs for January

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing After Dark in the Park and Hawaiian cultural programs with the community and visitors throughout January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. These programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

Rift

Volcano Awareness Month: 30th Anniversary of Kīlauea’s Ongoing East Rift Zone Eruption.  Jan. 3, 2013, marks the 30th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption.  During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea.  Although the eruption has been relatively quiet during the past year, with mostly steady but unusually weak activity, it has produced some dramatic lava flows in past years.  Tim Orr, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist, will review highlights from the past 30 years and talk about recent developments on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 8, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Crater

Volcano Awareness Month: What’s Happening in Halema‘uma‘u Crater? In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that has now grown to more than 520 feet wide.  While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, Kīlauea’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an overview of Kīlauea’s summit eruption, including a survey of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 15, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kai Ho'opi'i

Kai Hoopii, An Evening of Hawaiian Music. Listen to the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai Ho‘opi‘i is an Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto contest winner. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 16, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where:
Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Volcano Plumbing

Volcano Awareness Month: A Below-the-Scenes Look at Kīlauea Volcano’s “Plumbing” System. The magma storage and transport system beneath a volcano can be envisioned like the plumbing system of a house. Magma “pipes” connect different reservoirs, and can feed magma toward the surface or transport it laterally beneath the surface. Thanks to over a century of research, volcanologists have a good idea of where magma is stored beneath Kīlauea and how magma moves between summit storage areas and eruption sites (which can be many miles away) along the volcano’s rift zones. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Michael Poland will present a picture of what Kīlauea’s subsurface might look like based on observations from eruptions, earthquake patterns, ground deformation, chemical changes, and geologic studies. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 22, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Volcano Awareness Month: The Story Behind Monitoring Hawaiian Volcanoes & How HVO Gets the Data It Needs to Track Eruptions and Earthquakes. Have you ever wondered how scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory get the tilt, GPS, and seismic data they need to figure out what’s happening inside Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes? Or how the images of remote volcanic activity on HVO’s website get there? HVO’s chief technical support specialist Kevan Kamibayashi will explain the installation and operation of HVO’s various monitoring sensors and how their signals are sent back to the observatory from remote locations on the volcanoes. Don’t miss this opportunity to see some of the instruments used by HVO to monitor Hawaiian eruptions and earthquakes. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 29, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kaohu Monfort

Lā‘au Lapa‘au (Healing Medicine) with Ka‘ohu Monfort. Learn how plants are used as medicine. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge of how Hawai‘i’s native plants, including noni, kukui and ōlena, can heal and nourish. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 30 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where:
Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

3.3 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Fern Forest Area of the Big Island Today – No Tsunami Generated

earthquake

Magnitude 3.3
Date-Time
Location 19.320°N, 155.131°W
Depth 8.6 km (5.3 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 17 km (10 miles) S (180°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 18 km (11 miles) SE (143°) from Volcano, HI
  • 20 km (12 miles) S (188°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 35 km (22 miles) SW (223°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 43 km (27 miles) S (186°) from Hilo, HI
  • 358 km (222 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.8 km (0.5 miles); depth +/- 0.5 km (0.3 miles)
Parameters Nph= 50, Dmin=4 km, Rmss=0.12 sec, Gp=122°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60440981

 

3.3 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Maui This Morning

earthquake

Magnitude 3.3
Date-Time
Location 20.064°N, 156.733°W
Depth 4.9 km (3.0 miles)
Region MAUI REGION, HAWAII
Distances
  • 76 km (47 miles) SSW (204°) from Wailea-Makena, HI
  • 82 km (51 miles) SSW (200°) from Kihei, HI
  • 85 km (53 miles) WNW (297°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 177 km (110 miles) WNW (283°) from Hilo, HI
  • 179 km (111 miles) SE (140°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 1.6 km (1.0 miles); depth +/- 1.9 km (1.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 69, Dmin=88 km, Rmss=0.23 sec, Gp=245°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=3
Source
Event ID hv60439071

 

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Hits the Big Island this Afternoon

earthquake

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
  • Friday, November 30, 2012 at 04:04:28 PM at epicenter
Location 19.751°N, 156.327°W
Depth 21.5 km (13.4 miles)
Region HAWAII REGION, HAWAII
Distances
  • 34 km (21 miles) W (275°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 37 km (23 miles) WNW (290°) from Kailua, HI
  • 40 km (25 miles) WNW (292°) from Holualoa, HI
  • 130 km (81 miles) W (272°) from Hilo, HI
  • 233 km (145 miles) SE (138°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 13 km (8.1 miles); depth +/- 4.3 km (2.7 miles)
Parameters Nph= 19, Dmin=34 km, Rmss=0.15 sec, Gp=320°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60436111

 

Earthquakes Keep Rattling the Big Island – 3.0 Magnitude Registered Tonight

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
Location 19.433°N, 155.595°W
Depth 2 km (1.2 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 28 km (18 miles) NNW (334°) from Pahala, HI
  • 31 km (19 miles) E (93°) from Honaunau-Napoopoo, HI
  • 33 km (21 miles) ESE (103°) from Captain Cook, HI
  • 54 km (33 miles) SE (127°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 61 km (38 miles) WSW (240°) from Hilo, HI
  • 312 km (194 miles) SE (131°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.8 km (0.5 miles)
Parameters Nph= 26, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.29 sec, Gp= 43°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60434846

 

3.8 Magnitude Earthquake Just Shakes the Big Island of Hawaii

Magnitude 3.7  3.8 *Updgraded*
Date-Time
  • Sunday, November 25, 2012 at 01:56:21 PM at epicenter
Location 19.312°N, 155.216°W
Depth 9 km (5.6 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 15 km (10 miles) S (172°) from Volcano, HI
  • 20 km (12 miles) SSW (207°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 23 km (14 miles) SSW (210°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 42 km (26 miles) SW (231°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 46 km (28 miles) SSW (197°) from Hilo, HI
  • 351 km (218 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.5 km (0.3 miles)
Parameters Nph= 56, Dmin=7 km, Rmss=0.15 sec, Gp=130°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60434446

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes the Southern Part of the Big Island Tonight

 

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.196°N, 155.693°W
Depth 6.4 km (4.0 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 13 km (8 miles) NE (39°) from Hawaiian Ocean View, HI
  • 18 km (11 miles) NW (323°) from Naalehu, HI
  • 22 km (14 miles) W (268°) from Pahala, HI
  • 67 km (42 miles) SSE (151°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 85 km (53 miles) SW (228°) from Hilo, HI
  • 324 km (201 miles) SE (136°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 1 km (0.6 miles)
Parameters Nph= 47, Dmin=9 km, Rmss=0.2 sec, Gp=137°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60432611

3.0 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Volcano Area of Big Island This Morning

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
Location 19.378°N, 155.235°W
Depth 3.1 km (1.9 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 8 km (5 miles) S (180°) from Volcano, HI
  • 15 km (9 miles) SW (226°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SW (226°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 39 km (24 miles) WSW (241°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 40 km (25 miles) SSW (203°) from Hilo, HI
  • 345 km (214 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles)
Parameters Nph= 44, Dmin=1 km, Rmss=0.06 sec, Gp= 76°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=3
Source
Event ID hv60425206

3.0 Magnitude Earthquake Just Shook the Volcano Area of the Big Island

Magnitude 3.0
Date-Time
  • Friday, October 26, 2012 at 09:18:39 AM at epicenter
Location 19.377°N, 155.242°W
Depth 2.5 km (1.6 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 8 km (5 miles) S (185°) from Volcano, HI
  • 16 km (10 miles) SW (228°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SW (228°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 40 km (25 miles) SSW (204°) from Hilo, HI
  • 345 km (214 miles) SE (128°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.3 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Parameters Nph= 36, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.11 sec, Gp= 47°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60420136

3.2 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes East Hawaii Early in the Morning

Magnitude 3.2
Date-Time
Location 19.409°N, 155.321°W
Depth 4.2 km (2.6 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 10 km (6 miles) WSW (243°) from Volcano, HI
  • 21 km (13 miles) WSW (251°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 24 km (15 miles) SW (232°) from Mountain View, HI
  • 41 km (26 miles) SW (217°) from Hilo, HI
  • 336 km (209 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles)
Parameters Nph= 14, Dmin=2 km, Rmss=0.05 sec, Gp=130°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60375051

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Registered in Waimea

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.777°N, 155.573°W
Depth 16.4 km (10.2 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 29 km (18 miles) SE (128°) from Waikoloa Village, HI
  • 29 km (18 miles) SSE (159°) from Waimea, HI
  • 35 km (22 miles) ESE (119°) from Puako, HI
  • 52 km (32 miles) W (279°) from Hilo, HI
  • 290 km (180 miles) SE (126°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles); depth +/- 1.1 km (0.7 miles)
Parameters Nph= 43, Dmin=12 km, Rmss=0.09 sec, Gp= 86°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=1
Source
Event ID hv60366716