• Follow on Facebook

  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • air-tour-kauai
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    June 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    252627282930  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

15,000 lbs of Fishing Nets from Hawai’i Island Heading to “Nets-to-Energy” Program

Last Saturday, Hawai’i Wildlife Fund (HWF) and 8 volunteers loaded another 15,000 pounds of derelict fishing nets and bundles of line into a 40′ Matson container. This is the 10th container that has been filled by HWF since 2005.  HWF saves the nets it collects from marine debris cleanup events along the shoreline for inclusion in NOAA’s “nets to energy” partnership. Hawai’i was the first in the country to have a program like this in which these marine debris items are converted to electricity rather than going into a landfill. Now, many ports around the mainland US have similar strategies for this “fishing for energy” framework.

Net pile with 16 months worth of collection by HWF on Hawai’i Island

“This work would not be possible without the hundreds of volunteers who help Hawaii Wildlife Fund with these ocean debris removal efforts every year. In particular, this net loading was made possible due to the generous donation by JD Services, LLC of a tractor and operator for the day, and the County of Hawaii for allowing us to store these nets at the Nā‘āhelu transfer station in between container loads,” said Megan Lamson, HWF Program Director for Hawaii Island.

Here in Hawaii, Matson Navigation provides the 40′ container and free shipping of this type of marine debris from outer islands to O’ahu. Then, Schnitzer Steel, a metal recycling company, cuts the nets into smaller pieces before they are delivered to the Covanta H-power Plant in Kapolei. There, they are burned and converted to electricity for the City and County of Honolulu.

Megan Lamson controlling winch pulling a large net off the Ka’ū coast.

The vast majority of these nets were pulled off the remote and rocky Ka’ū coastline. Six large net bundles (~1,200 lbs) were pulled out of the ocean by boaters in West Hawai’i and dropped off at Honokōhau Harbor earlier in 2017.

Lamson says, “HWF is committed to removing marine debris from along our shorelines and working with local residents, businesses and government representatives to reduce the amount of plastic that finds its way into the ocean. Plastic pollution is a serious problem that now impacts most life forms that live in the ocean or use the ocean as a food source. But, it’s a problem with an obvious solution. We must start reducing our usage of plastics, especially single-use plastics in order to protect the health of the ocean, and the health of the wildlife and people who depend on the ocean – all of us!”

Hawaii Wildlife Fund Releases New Marine Debris Prevention Curriculum for Elementary School Students

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) is excited to announce the release of our new marine debris prevention curriculum designed for elementary school students around Hawaiʻi.

hwf-kidsOver the past two school years, HWF mentors piloted this curriculum in 20 public schools working with over 52 different teachers and 1,140 students (grade kindergarten to 5th).  HWF mentors worked with students at schools around Hawaiʻi Island: in Kona, Kohala, Kaʻū, Hāmākua, Hilo, and Puna.

beach-clean-up-hwfThe “Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach” program teaches children about:

  • Understanding aquatic life and ecosystems (basic marine biology concepts)
  • Marine debris and how land-based litter sources find their way into the sea
  • Exploring what a “discard” really is and how our daily choices affect the amount of trash we produce
  • Vulnerability of island ecosystems and communities and the responsibility (kuleana) that we each have to protect them.

The curriculum was designed as a 3-visit program that challenged students to put forward innovative solutions to this global marine-debris problem.  The lessons are aligned with all Common Core and Next Generation Science and other benchmarks relevant to the elementary school level.

innovations-posterAll of the lessons and activities are available for free download from the HWF website or at the following link: http://wildhawaii.org/MDKEO/Su mmaryTeacherEdition.pdf

“It was a great pleasure guest teaching in the many different classrooms around the island.  We look forward to deepening our relationships with Hawaiʻi Island students and teachers in the coming years” said HWF mentor and Education Coordinator, Stacey Breining.

school-reached

In addition, nine cleanup events were conducted as an optional follow-up component of this program (6 beach cleanups, 2 stream cleanups, 1 campus cleanup).   During these nine cleanup events, 286 students participated in removing over 1,500 lbs. of marine and land-based debris items from the coastline, stream banks, or their campus.

Please contact HWF at marine.debris.KEO@gmail.com or 808-769-7629 for more information or visit the HWF website (www.wildhawaii.org).

100 Participate in International Symposium Hosted by Hawai’i Wildlife Fund

Last week, Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) & World Ocean Collective (WOC) hosted their first ever international symposium in Hilo, Hawaii, entitled the 2015 Hilo Symposium on Marine Debris & Tsunami Driftage: Dialogue on marine debris removal, prevention, disaster recovery and making connections around the North Pacific.

Photo of the symposium attendees after Friday night’s public event.

Photo of the symposium attendees after Friday night’s public event.

It took place on December 3rd-4th, 2015 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA)’s Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, followed by a culminating beach cleanup event hosted by HWF at Kamilo Point, Ka’ū District, Hawai’i Island on December 5th.

HWF worked together with local marine debris partners (including Surfrider Foundation, Kōkua Hawaii Foundation, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, NOAA’s Marine Debris Program, DLNR’s Division of Aquatic Resources, County of Hawai‘i Aquatics Department and local Int’l Coastal Cleanup coordinators); groups from the Pacific Northwest (Washington CoastSavers, SOLVE Oregon, Lion’s Club International); and Japan (Japan Environmental Action Network “JEAN”, Sea Beautification Society) to achieve the following goals:

  1. Share effective recovery and removal techniques;
  2. Spread the word about tsunami and disaster preparedness;
  3. Share updates and new information about ongoing marine debris prevention work; and
  4. Make connections and work together to reduce the amount of marine debris in our world’s oceans and waterways.

In total, 50 participants attended the entire two-day symposium and subsequent cleanup event where over 1,000 pounds of marine debris were collected for disposal, art projects and recycling. Well over 100 people attended the public symposium on Friday evening (Dec. 4th) in downtown Hilo. Working with members of the international marine debris removal community, Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund showcased the work of non-profit and agency partners around the Pacific shorelines that has been accomplished in response to and since the March 11th, 2011 earthquake and tsunami tragedy in East Japan. Presentations were given by experts from Hawai‘i Island, O‘ahu, Kaua‘i, Washington State, British Columbia, Georgia, and Japan.

“We are humbled by the turnout of this past week and have made new friends and allies in our mission to remove and prevent marine debris to protect native wildlife. The three days with our partners around the North Pacific were very productive”, said Megan Lamson, HWF’s Hawaiʻi Island Program Director. “Marine debris is everyone’s problem and is a worldwide issue. We have to think globally and act locally to inspire the change we seek in this world. By coming together to share stories and to discuss effective cleanup strategies as a team, we can reduce the amount of marine debris in our world’s oceans hopefully even prevent it.”

Group shot after the Kamilo cleanup event where over 1,000 lbs. of debris were  removed in about three hous by HWF and volunteers.

Group shot after the Kamilo cleanup event where over 1,000 lbs. of debris were removed in about three hous by HWF and volunteers.

There were eight presentations each day, including a keynote speech by Dr. Walter Dudley, Emeritus Professor of Marine Geology and Oceanography with the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, where he taught for over 30 years. Dudley also serves as Science Advisory Council chair with the Pacific Tsunami Museum. During his talk, he shared the science of tsunamis, preparedness advice, facts about local Hilo tsunamis, and also stories about how disaster debris saved lives (when it was used as life rafts).

In addition, shorter presentations were shared by the NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Regional Coordinator, Surfrider Kauaʻi cleanup coordinators, International Pacific Research Center scientists, Resource Mapping Hawai‘i, cleanup coordinators in the Pacific Northwest and Japan (JEAN), and two debris artists from British Columbia, Peter Clarkson, and Atlanta, Pam Longobardi.

In addition, an update was provided on marine debris monitoring and response by DLNR’s new Marine Debris Coordinator, Kirsten Moy, who introduced Resource Mapping’s Miguel Castrence to discuss the aerial-ortho imagery their company is collecting to identify current marine debris and “JTMD” (Japan Tsunami Marine Debris) hotspots around each of the shorelines in the Main Hawaiian Islands.

Both this aerial survey project and the debris coordinator position were funded by donations from the Japan Ministry of the Environment after the March 2011 East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Moy shared that as of September 2015, 64 debris items had been confirmed as JTMD and about half of them, or 30, had washed ashore in Hawaiʻi or were discovered in Hawaiian waters.

The evening was concluded with a final talk from Angela Kang, coordinator of the Hawai‘i Zero Waste Alliance. Kang’s presentation was titled, “The Tao of Zero Waste” and she urged audience members to live a more pono lifestyle by only purchasing items that can be recycled or composted, and not incinerated or landfilled. Lamson closed the evening by adding that, “There is no time for negativity and we must all be on board together to stop this global flood of marine debris”.

Hawaii Wildlife Fund and State Team Up to Clean Manukā Natural Area Reserve (NAR)

Saturday marked the fifth year that Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) has teamed up with the State’s Natural Area Reserve crew to clean up a stretch of coastline within the Manukā Natural Area Reserve (NAR), which extends from Ka‘ū into South Kona.  During this time, over 130 people have helped haul over 2,975 pounds of marine debris and shoreline rubbish off this remote stretch of coastline that extends from Humuhumu Pt. to the north.

Group photo at the end of a long, successful, cleanup day!

Group photo at the end of a long, successful, cleanup day!

This weekend was no different.  After driving over very rough roads and hiking over a mile each way, the 30 cleanup participants hauled 26 bags of debris (weighing ~430 lbs.) off the isolated shoreline.  Volunteers came from Hilo, Kona, Puna and Kaʻū and worked for hours on this collective mission to mālama ke kahakai (take care of the shoreline).

Cleanup volunteer, Joe Robinson, drives the HWF truck towards the cleanup site.

Cleanup volunteer, Joe Robinson, drives the HWF truck towards the cleanup site.

NAR Specialist, Jenn Randall, arranged to bring an all-terrain vehicle to haul debris back to the staging site where it will be removed by helicopter in the coming week.  Mike McCagh, with HI Kombucha, brought a keg of grapefruit kombucha tea to share with the hardworking participants.  Tony Villegas, with Coconut Auto Repair, provided a 4WD vehicle to transport a group of youngsters from Kaʻū.  Joe Robinson, underwater photographer from Kailua-Kona, donated his time and equipment to photo document and film the event.  Randall, added that they were quite pleased by the outcome of the day and that volunteers had removed all the debris she was hoping for with energy and enthusiasm.

Volunteers, Brian Waldo and Tony Villegas, showing off their debris finds.

Volunteers, Brian Waldo and Tony Villegas, showing off their debris finds.

HWF has been leading community-based efforts to remove marine debris from along the Ka‘ū coastline since 2003.  During this time, HWF estimates that over 90% of the 168 tons of debris removed is plastic (e.g., fishing line/nets, shampoo bottles, toothbrushes).  As the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Marine Debris Program shares, “Marine debris affects everyone”.  Here locally, HWF strongly believes that the solution begins with individuals like those of who volunteered this weekend and with the small decisions that residents of Hawaiʻi Island make each day.

An assortment of interesting finds from the event … (not including one small glass float).

An assortment of interesting finds from the event … (not including one small glass float).

Examples of these choices include re-using or simply refusing single-usage plastics, bringing your own water bottle or using available drinking fountains, and carrying your own to-go ware to Styrofoam-toting restaurants.

HWF’s Project Coordinator, Megan Lamson, implores, “Do your part to help our marine and coastal wildlife: choose to re-use, remember to recycle, and limit your single-use purchases!  We live on an island, and we must be mindful of how we are treating the land, freshwater, and ocean that support us.”

Kaʻū youth group with their leader, Terry Shibuya, and NARS crew (intern Rory and Specialist Jenn Randall).

Kaʻū youth group with their leader, Terry Shibuya, and NARS crew (intern Rory and Specialist Jenn Randall).

For more info about getting involved in an upcoming cleanup event, please contact HWF at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, call 808-769-769 or check out their website at www.wildhawaii.org

Mahalo to the Hawaii Wildlife Fund and Laupahoehoe Public Charter School

Hawaii Wildlife Fund (HWF) and Laupahoehoe Public Charter School’s sixth graders teamed up to spruce up Hilo’s bayfront on Friday.

bags full of trash, weighing in at around 55 pounds, were removed from Hilo’s bayfront Friday morning by 6th grade students from LPCS at a beach clean up hosted by a local non-profit, Hawaii Wildlife Fund"

Bags full of trash, weighing in at around 55 pounds, were removed from Hilo’s bayfront Friday morning by 6th grade students from LPCS at a beach clean up hosted by a local non-profit, Hawaii Wildlife Fund”

This cleanup was in preparation for Sunday’s Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa event. In only one hour, 10 students and 5 adults managed to remove 1,082 pieces of trash from the bayfront – approximately 55 lbs in 2 bags. The crew mostly picked up land-based trash including lots of cigarette butts along with some more interesting finds like a cow bell, a shaving razor, and several small bundles of derelict fishing nets.

A 6th grader, from Laupahoehoe Public Charter SChool (LPCS) removes a large tire from Hilo’s bayfront on Friday, March 7 during a beach clean up with Hawai’i Wildlife Fund.

A 6th grader, from Laupahoehoe Public Charter SChool (LPCS) removes a large tire from Hilo’s bayfront on Friday, March 7 during a beach clean up with Hawai’i Wildlife Fund.

HWF is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving Hawaii’s native flora and fauna

To learn more about regular beach cleanup opportunities on Hawai‘i and Maui Islands, please contact HWF at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com or see our website at www.wildhawaii.org.

 

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Hawaii Wildlife Fund Kau Community Work Day

Join Hawaii Wildlife Fund (HWF) to learn about native plants, animals, and anchialine pool ecosystems, participate in “muck sucking” and help us remove invasive grasses from this fragile habitat!

Kau Restoration DayWHEN: Friday January 24th and Sat January 25th

Please bring your kids, families, tabie, bag lunch, water/beverages, hat, sunglasses, small hand tools, work clothes, swimsuit and 4WD vehicles (if can)

HWF will provide gloves, buckets, tools, sunscreen and water re-fills.

PRIZES will be awarded to the best ne “muck sucker”, for the best fall into the pool, to the dirtiest volunteer (i.e. covered in much and/or limu and to the person who hauls the most buckets of paspalum.

For more info OR to RSVP please contact Megan Rose Lamson at meg.HWF@gmail.com or 808/769-7629.

 

Hawaii Wildlife Fund to Be Featured on CNN – Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris and Kamilo Beach

On Tuesday (March 5th), Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) staff and several volunteers brought an LA-based CNN news crew down to Kamilo Point to talk story about potential Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris and marine debris problems along the southeast coastline.

CNN correspondent Kyung Lah interviewing HWF’s Megan Lamson at Kamilo. Photo courtesy of Harold Leatherman/HWF volunteer.

CNN correspondent Kyung Lah interviewing HWF’s Megan Lamson at Kamilo. Photo courtesy of Harold Leatherman/HWF volunteer.

The story will be told by CNN news correspondent Kyung Lah. The first part of this story will air on Mon., March 11th at 9am Eastern Standard Time “EST” (4am in Hawaiʻi“ HST” so have your DVRs ready!), at 10am EST (5am HST), and will re-run throughout the day. HWF will post a link on their website  www.wildhawaii.org and on their Facebook page  www.facebook.com/hawaiiwildlifefund as soon as it appears online.

This story will appear as a special on the two-year anniversary of the huge tsunami that originated in the Fukushima district in Japan.

HWF would again like to express our deepest sympathy to the victims and victims’ family of this natural disaster. First and foremost, this event was a human tragedy. Thousands of people died, and yes indeed, tons of debris were also released into the ocean. While we are thankful for the amount of attention this event has caused for marine debris awareness around the globe, we want all of our volunteers to recognize that marine debris has been a serious problem for decades (basically since the invention of plastic). HWF has picked up international debris from shorelines throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago since 1998 and realizes that marine debris is a people problem, not solely the result of a single tsunami event or country of origin.

Let us not forget that each of us contributes to this problem daily by using (and improperly disposing of) single-use throwaway and non-recyclable plastic products.  In turn, we can each be part of the solution and choose to re-use, reduce, recycle, and refuse (excess packaging, single-use items, etc.) and participate in local cleanup events.

While CNN was setting up shop, HWF and volunteers quickly removed over 200 pounds of marine debris from the coastline with an hour’s effort. And until there is a better solution, HWF and volunteers will continue to pick up the pieces here in Hawaiʻi nei.

FYI another follow-up story that focuses on marine debris problems in general, NOAA’s Nets-to-Energy Program, and recycled “ocean plastic” bottled cleaning products by SF-based company, Method, will air on CNN national and international broadcasting programs in April.