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Hawaii Update on Mumps: Outbreak Continues with 18 Additional Cases, Including 2 on Hawaii Island and 4 on Kauai

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed 18 new cases of residents with the mumps, raising the total number of statewide cases this year to 172. Nine of the new cases of individuals are adults. Twelve of the cases are from Oahu, four are from Kauai and two are from Hawaii Island.

DOH continues to stress the importance of following its recommendations to help prevent the spread of mumps.“The important thing for people to remember is to keep their germs to themselves,” said Ronald Balajadia, Immunization Branch Chief, DOH Disease Outbreak Control Division. “We encourage the public to stay home when sick, cover their mouths when coughing or sneezing, wash their hands frequently and make sure they are fully vaccinated.”

DOH urges all adults born in or after 1957 without evidence of immunity to mumps to receive the MMR vaccine which prevents most, but not all, cases of mumps. Individuals with only one documented MMR dose are strongly encouraged to consider receiving a second vaccine dose at a minimum of four weeks after the first dose. Two doses of the vaccine are 88 percent effective at protecting against mumps and one dose is 78 percent effective. For this reason, being fully vaccinated is important in helping to protect family members, friends, coworkers, classmates, and your community.

DOH also recommends that all children receive two doses of the MMR vaccine, the first of which is routinely given at age 12–15 months and the second dose at 4–6 years of age. However, because of the continued circulation of mumps in Hawaii, children between 1–4 years of age should receive their second dose now (a minimum of four weeks after the first dose).

To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

The majority of the 172 confirmed cases are on Oahu, with 13 on Kauai and three from Hawaii Island. None of the individuals required hospitalization and all are recovering. DOH expects more cases in the coming weeks as mumps is a highly-contagious disease.

DOH will post the latest mumps cases online at: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/ at 12 noon every Thursday. The site offers current information about the state’s ongoing investigation.

Hawaii Department of Health Confirms 11 New Cases of Mumps – Total Now at 154

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed eleven (11) new cases of residents with the mumps, raising the total number of statewide cases this year to 154. Seven (7) of the new cases of individuals are adults. Ten (10) of the cases are from Oahu and one is from Kauai. None of the individuals required hospitalization and all are recovering.  More cases are expected in the coming weeks as mumps is a highly-contagious disease.

To help prevent the spread of mumps, ensure that your family is fully vaccinated with the MMR vaccine.  All adults born in or after 1957, without evidence of immunity to mumps and who cannot verify previous MMR vaccination, should receive one MMR dose.

Individuals with only one documented MMR dose are strongly encouraged to consider receiving a second vaccine dose at a minimum of four weeks after the first dose.  Although it is not ideal, receiving extra doses of the vaccine poses no medical problem.

All children should receive two doses of the MMR vaccine. The first dose is given at age 12–15 months and the second dose routinely at 4–6 years of age. However, because of the continued circulation of mumps in Hawaii, children between 1–4 years of age should receive their second dose now (a minimum of also four weeks after the first dose).

Patients suspected or diagnosed with mumps should remain at home to avoid spreading the disease to others. According to Hawaii State Law, a person with mumps may not attend school, work or travel for nine (9) days after the onset of parotitis (swelling of the salivary glands).Mumps is spread easily through coughing, sneezing and touching objects or surfaces with unwashed hands.  Symptoms include fever, headache, swollen glands in front of the ears or jaw, tiredness and muscle aches.

To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.  More information about mumps and the ongoing investigation can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/.

14 More Mumps Cases Reported – First Big Island Case Confirmed

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed fourteen (14) more cases of residents with the mumps, raising the total number of cases this year to 133. Eleven (11) cases are on Oahu, two (2) are on Kauai and one (1) is on Hawaii Island, representing that island’s first confirmed mumps case this year.

The new cases involved eight (8) adults. None of the cases required hospitalization and all are recovering. DOH officials are investigating the new cases and expect the mumps virus to continue circulating across the state.

DOH urges those who are suspected or diagnosed with mumps to stay at home to avoid exposing others. According to Hawaii State Law, a person with mumps may not attend school, work or travel for nine (9) days after the start of swollen salivary glands.“We continue to see people with mumps being mobile in the community well after the onset of the illness and before they have been diagnosed,” said Dr. Park. “This increases the risk for introduction of the disease on other islands and areas of our state as well as continued spread on Oahu.”

Mumps is highly-contagious and is spread through coughing, sneezing and sharing cups and utensils. Symptoms include swollen or tender salivary glands, fever, tiredness and muscle aches.

To prevent the spread of mumps in our community, persons exhibiting symptoms of the disease should contact their healthcare provider immediately. Additionally, everyone is asked to review their immunization records to ensure they are fully vaccinated.

All children should receive two doses of the MMR vaccine which protects against three diseases: measles, mumps and rubella. The first dose is given at age 12–15 months and the second dose routinely at 4–6 years of age. However, due to the continued circulation of mumps in Hawaii, children between 1–4 years of age should receive their second dose now (a minimum of 4 weeks after the first dose).

All adults born in or after 1957, without evidence of immunity to mumps and who cannot verify previous MMR vaccination, should receive one MMR dose.

Individuals with only one documented MMR dose are strongly encouraged to consider receiving a second MMR vaccine dose. To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

More information about mumps and the ongoing investigation can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/.

8 More Mumps Cases Reported on Oahu – Number of Cases Now at 104

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed eight (8) additional cases this week of Oahu residents with the mumps, pushing the total number of cases this year to 104.

Three new cases were confirmed on Tuesday, June 13, and involved two (2) adults and one (1) child. None of the cases required hospitalization and all three are recovering. An additional five (5) cases were confirmed today, involving one (1) adult and four (4) children, none of whom required hospitalization.

DOH expects the current mumps outbreak to continue and the investigation of new cases is ongoing. Mumps is highly contagious and is spread through coughing, sneezing and sharing cups and utensils. Symptoms include swollen or tender salivary glands, low fever, tiredness and muscle aches. People who think they have mumps should contact their health care provider and remain at home.  The MMR vaccine provides the best protection against the disease. Two doses of the vaccine are 88 percent effective at protecting against mumps and one dose is 78 percent effective. Being fully vaccinated can help protect loved ones, family members, friends, classmates and coworkers.

The MMR vaccine is available at local pharmacies across the state. To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

Additional information about mumps and the ongoing investigation can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/.