Hapa Fund Grants Now Available for Waimea Community Nonprofits

Hawai’i Community Foundation (HCF) announced today that grants benefiting the Waimea community on Hawai’i Island are now available through the Hapa Fund of HCF.

Hawaii Community Foundation

Established by a local resident, the Fund supports organizations and community groups in their grassroots, hands-on fundraising activities. Organizations can receive up to $2,500 in matching grant dollars from the Fund to multiply the impact of their fundraising event efforts.

To apply to the Hapa Fund, organizations should submit a letter no longer than two pages with the following information:

  • Organization’s purpose
  • Project or event summary
  • Fundraising plan
  • Number of people involved

A project budget must also be included with the letter.  Letters may be submitted prior to the event or activity, however, evidence of the funds raised for the match requirement must be submitted before receiving the grant.

Application letters to the Hapa Fund should be mailed in duplicate (two copies) to the Waimea office of Hawai’i Community Foundation at 65-1279 Kawaiahe Road, Parker Square #203, Kamuela, HI 96743.

Hawai’i Community Foundation Restoration Partnership Announces over $400,000 in Grants to Local Nonprofits

The Hawai’i Community Foundation (HCF) today announced its 2014 recipients of the Community Restoration Partnership (CRP) grants, totaling over $400,000 to fund the protection and restoration of Hawai’i’s coastal areas.

Hawaii Community FoundationCRP is a collaboration of government agencies, foundations and private donors who provide funds to ensure healthy and sustainable fishery resources, advance innovative restoration techniques, engage local communities in active environmental stewardship, and encourage science-based monitoring to evaluate restoration project success.

“As Hawai’i’s unique coastal resources face increasing threats from invasive species, climate change, and development, it’s more important than ever to support the key organizations who help to protect our environment,” said Josh Stanbro, director of environment and sustainability at HCF. “Through the Community Restoration Partnership, we provide financial assistance for on-the-ground restoration projects that improve ecosystem function and support traditional cultural practices.”

CRP began in 2009 as a partnership with NOAA’s Restoration Center, supported by former Senator Daniel K. Inouye.  Since its inception, the partnership has provided more than $1.5 million in funding to local community organizations, actively bridging cultural and environmental stewardship efforts.

“One of the main priorities of the Hawaii Tourism Authority is to support programs that protect and enhance Hawai’i’s unique natural resources and environment, which are frequented by visitors,” said Mike McCartney, president and CEO of the HTA. “Supporting HCF’s Community Restoration Partnership programs allows us to sustain our environment, which is one of our most precious destination assets.”

The Community Restoration Partnership is made possible by the Hawai’i Community Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Restoration Center, the Weissman Family Foundation, the Hawai’i Tourism Authority.  Another key partner-the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation-recently offered a new challenge grant to inspire new funders to join CRP.  All funding partners jointly review and recommend grants each year through a unique advisory process that also includes resource specialists.

“The most successful community groups have tackled their projects with multiple partners,” says Stanbro. “We’ve taken the same collaborative approach on the funding side and learned a lot in the process.”

Interested funders for the Community Restoration Partnership may contact Josh Stanbro at 808-537-6333 or jstanbro@hcf-hawaii.org. Grant applications for upcoming projects will soon be available, due for submission in July 2014. For more information, visit http://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/grants/community-restoration-partnership.

2014 Community Restoration Partnership Grant Recipients:

Friends of Waikīkī Aquarium: A sustainable program that seeks to restore the native marine plant and herbivore community to the reef at Waikiki, specifically addressing invasive algae (seaweeds).

Hui Aloha Kīholo: A restoration project that includes activities in six anchialine pools along the North Kona coastline, protecting the unique habitat from invasive non-native fish, as well as re-establishing a sustainable population of ‘opae’ula to reintroduce the region-specific traditional practice of palu ‘opelu fishing.

Kaiola Canoe Club: A program that clears mangrove and other invasive plants and replants native vegetation to reclaim nearly three acres near the Pu’ali Stream, organizes community work days with youth organizations, and serves the neighboring communities.

Kohala Watershed Partnership: Continued work to restore native vegetation and reduce the bare ground on the Kohala watershed, providing an opportunity for Pelekane Bay’s marine habitats to regenerate while sharing methods and knowledge with restoration projects along the Kohala coastline to multiply the impact of their work on land-based sediment pollution.

Kupu: Kupu’s CU program (formerly known as the Urban Corp), provides under-serviced youth and young adults an opportunity to gain work experience and the chance to graduate with a high school diploma, including a total of 2,500 hours of volunteer service each year at sites that focus on marine resources as well as expanding natural resource and coastal environmental knowledge to a population of young adults who often have little to no knowledge or experience with natural cultural resources.

Mālama Pupukea-Waimea: A project that protects the coral reef habitat in the Pupukea Marine Life Conservation District, reducing sediment flow to the reef by installing native plants to hold in place soil currently eroding from the Pupukea Beach Park.

Maunalei Community Marine & Terrestrial Management: A project to protect and restore the coral reef habitat and estuaries and reduce annual land-based sediment by fencing near shore coastal watershed habitat to eliminate overgrazing impacts, allow for native flora plantings, implement permaculture erosion mitigation methods, establish a good well source of water to support traditional farming practice, and create a multi-story agroforest to stabilize the slope and provide food crops for the community.

The Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i: The Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i’s Kane’ohe Bay Reef Restoration Project will construct a mini-barge that will be used to remove and transport invasive algae from the reef in Kaneʻohe Bay to the Heʻeia wetlands to be used as fertilizer by the nonprofit Kakoʻo ʻOiwi’s agricultural projects, as well as support the restoration of native sea urchins and other herbivores in Kane’ohe Bay to continually manage algae regrowth.

Waipa Foundation: A project to continue the restoration of function and habitat in a degraded segment of Waipa Stream and its estuary as well as enhancing coastal wetland habitat, targeting another two acres in 2014 to build upon the four acres already treated.

Guy Toyama Memorial Fund Establishes a New Scholarship for Hawaii Students

An investment in students commemorates the life of a Hawaii visionary while fostering positive change now and in the future.

The Guy Toyama Memorial Fund is announcing its first academic scholarship in partnership with the Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF). The academic scholarship, available to qualifying high school or college students who live in Hawaii and are pursuing a degree in the fields of sustainability, entrepreneurship or related disciplines, is made possible by donations from friends, family and businesses, and furthers Guy’s global vision for a better future.

Guy Toyama gave a presentation at the 2012 Sam Choy's Keauhou Poke Contest

Guy Toyama gave a presentation at the 2012 Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest

“Guy understood that, in order to create a sustainable future, we need to invest in the students of today. This scholarship is a small step toward creating businesses and systems that accomplish this goal,” said Rod Hinman, Steering Committee Chair of the Guy Toyama Memorial Fund.

Eligible students must enroll in a 2‐year or 4‐year college program, and should demonstrate a commitment to an area of study related to sustainability. Examples include: permaculture, environmental management, architecture or green building, ecology, ecological economics, sustainable agriculture, energy efficiency and renewable energy, green business management, or philosophy/ethics with a sustainability focus.

In addition to the academic scholarship managed by the HCF, the Guy Toyama Memorial Fund operates under the fiscal sponsorship of the Institute for a Sustainable Future (ISF). Through the ISF, the fund will provide grants for non‐profit projects focused on innovation and sustainability. The combination of grants and academic scholarships will create positive outcomes for future generations.

The late Guy Toyama shows off his award winning Abalone Poke.

The late Guy Toyama shows off his award winning Abalone Poke.

Guy Toyama, a Hawaii visionary and champion of sustainable business and renewable energy, passed away in November of 2012. In honor of his longstanding commitment to improving the relationship between people and the islands, his never‐ending spirit of kuleana will be carried on through the Guy Toyama Memorial Fund. All who knew Guy were touched by his enthusiasm for life and his many passions. His joyful exuberance and his exceptional knowledge of how to live lightly on the planet were a source of inspiration to many.

Hawaii Community Foundation’s scholarship program awards over $4 million each year and consists of more than 180 different scholarship opportunities established by generous individuals, families, businesses or organizations to assist Hawaii’s residents in obtaining a college education. Some scholarship funds are part of the HCF and some opportunities are through private foundations that contract with HCF to administer their scholarships. Students apply online with one common application and, if eligible, can be awarded from one or more of these funds. To submit an online application, search for a scholarship or find more information, please visit www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org.

About the Guy Toyama Memorial Fund

The Guy Toyama Memorial Fund is dedicated to honoring the memory of Guy Toyama by establishing scholarships and awarding grants to non‐profits working in the areas of sustainability, renewable energy, waste reduction, and local food production. Requests for additional information can be addressed to info@guytoyamafund.org, or by visiting www.guytoyamafund.org.

Hawai’i Community Foundation Offers Students Over $4 Million in Scholarships

Starting Monday, Dec. 2, Hawai’i Community Foundation (HCF) will begin accepting online scholarship applications from Hawai’i students seeking financial assistance to fund their higher education. With more than 180 scholarship opportunities and $4 million in scholarships available, Hawai’i Community Foundation is the third largest private scholarship provider in the state. HCF has provided scholarships to students to achieve higher education for over 30 years, with individuals receiving an average scholarship reward of $2,200 in 2013.

HCF Scholarships“For over 30 years, Hawai’i Community Foundation has been proud to provide students with opportunities to pursue a college education through scholarships made possible by our generous donors,” said Amy Luersen, director of philanthropic services at HCF. “As costs associated with college tuition and expenses continue to be top of mind, we hope that parents and students will take advantage of this opportunity to alleviate some of those financial pressures.”

Students can apply for scholarships at www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/scholarships. In addition to the application, students will be required to submit supporting documents, including: a full Student Aid Report (SAR) generated when completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), grade transcript, and personal statement. Approximately 60 – 90 minutes should be allotted to complete the application and upload the required documents.

This year, students who submit their online application by Jan. 31, 2014, will have their applications reviewed by HCF’s scholarship team, who will verify if the SAR and transcript are acceptable. The team will notify the applicant of missing or incorrect documents so that they are able to resubmit their application for consideration by the final deadline to apply for scholarships – Feb. 20, 2014.

HCF’s scholarship program consists of more than 180 different scholarship opportunities established by generous individuals, families, businesses and organizations to assist Hawai’i’s residents in obtaining a college education. HCF also provides contract services to private foundations and organizations to administer its scholarships. Students apply online with one common application and, if eligible, can be awarded from one or more of these funds.

To submit an online application, search for a scholarship, or learn how to start a scholarship fund, please visit www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/scholarships.

 

Daniel K. Inouye Memorial Fund Awards First Set of Grants

More than $100,000 provided to support organizations and causes championed by the late Senator Inouye

Hawai’i Community Foundation announced today that the Daniel K. Inouye Memorial Fund has awarded a total of $107,000 to the following 35 organizations in its first set of grants:

  • 442nd Regimental Combat Team Foundation
  • ‘Ahahui Mālama I Ka Lōkahi
  • Alaka’ina Foundation
  • Aloha Medical Mission
  • American Cancer Society Hawai’i Pacific
  • Bishop Museum
  • Boy Scouts of America – Aloha Council
  • Boys & Girls Club of Hawai’i
  • Filipino Community Center, Inc.
  • Girl Scouts of Hawai’i
  • Harris United Methodist Church
  • Hawai’i 3R’s
  • Hawai’i United Okinawa Association
  • Hawai’i Foodbank
  • Hawai’i Public Radio
  • Hawai’i Public Television Foundation dba PBS Hawai’i
  • Historic Hawai’i Foundation
  • Japanese American National Museum
  • Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai’i
  • Ka ‘Ohana O Kalaupapa
  • Kaua’i Economic Development Board
  • Kīlauea Point Natural History Association
  • Maui Arts & Cultural Center
  • Maui Economic Development Board Inc.
  • National Marine Sanctuary Foundation
  • National Tropical Botanical Garden
  • Nisei Veterans Memorial Center on Maui
  • Parents and Children Together
  • Rotary District 5000 Foundation
  • State of Hawai’i, DOE – Wai’anae High School
  • Susannah Wesley Community Center
  • The Friends of ‘Iolani Palace
  • University of Hawai’i Foundation – ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai’i
  • U.S. – Japan Council
  • YMCA of Honolulu, Metropolitan Office

“The Hawai’i Community Foundation is honored and privileged to award the first grants of the Daniel K. Inouye Memorial Fund,” said Kelvin H. Taketa, Hawai’i Community Foundation president and CEO. “The legacy of Senator Inouye, his tremendous leadership and courage, continues to support and inspire our community today.”

Senator Daniel K. Inouye

Senator Daniel K. Inouye

“These grants are a small token of appreciation for the important work these organizations did with Dan over the years to enhance the social fabric of Hawai’i, which he dearly loved,” said Irene Hirano Inouye, wife of the late Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. “I hope they will continue their collective good work in the years ahead.”

The Daniel K. Inouye Memorial Fund was created in December 2012 at the request of Irene Hirano Inouye. The fund was established to continue to help the organizations and causes that the senator supported over the years. To date, the fund has received 613 donations from the public amounting to more than $173,000.

Inouye passed away on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 at the age of 88 from respiratory complications. He was the second longest serving member of the U.S. Senate prior to his death, with 49 years of service.

 

Neighborhood Place of Puna: Sports Rescue Program

Calling for Donations of new and gently used youth sports equipment.

Neighborhood Place of Puna is seeking donations of new and gently used youth sports equipment for our Sports Rescue Program.

Sports Rescue

Neighborhood Place of Puna’s Sports Rescue program takes donated sports equipment like footballs, cleats, protective gear, and makes it available to East Hawaii children and youth who cannot afford to buy the equipment necessary to play sports.

Neighborhood Place of Puna believes that every child deserves the right to play team sports. The Sports Rescue program is one way that we as a community can share what we have to make sure that every child has a chance to play team sports.

Donations will be accepted at our Pahoa office, 15-3039 Pahoa Village Rd, during business hours: 8:00am-4:30pm, Monday – Friday.

Other collection dates include:

  • Saturday, April 27th: 10 am – 1 pm- Sangha Hall in Hilo at the Celebrate Your Family Event
  • Saturday May 18th, 5pm- 10pm- Civic Auditorium at the Paradise Roller Girls Season Opener
  • Saturday June 22nd, 8am– Maku’u Market at the Annual Free School Supply Distribution

This program is made possible through a grant from Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation.

Neighborhood Place of Puna (NPP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization working to help families raise healthy safe keiki by providing families with the tools and supports they need to be successful.

Mediation Center Receives Challenge Grant from Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund

Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center has been awarded a $25,000 challenge grant from the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF).

Kuikahi Mediation Center

“We are so grateful to the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund and HCF for this opportunity. The Fund will match contributions 2 to 1, up to $25,000.  That means we need to raise $12,500 in order to receive the full match,” said Executive Director Julie Mitchell.

She added, “Every $1 donated will be matched by $2 from the Fund, totaling $3 of support.”

Ku’ikahi Mediation Center is the sole non-profit mediation center serving East Hawai‘i and one of only five in the state.  The agency helps individuals, families, organizations, businesses, schools, and others to find creative solutions to challenging situations.  Mediation resolutions tend to be long lasting and help to improve relationships, promote understanding, and ultimately strengthen the community.

“Our mediation services are provided on a sliding scale fee schedule, and no one is turned away for lack of funds.  Over 50% of our clients have annual household incomes of under $20,000,” stated Mitchell.  “In this difficult economy of high unemployment, debt defaults, and home foreclosures, our community mediation services are often the only option for those with low or no incomes to resolve conflicts and move on with their lives.”

All funds raised will be earmarked to support community mediation services and promote peaceful solutions in East Hawai‘i.  Since Ku‘ikahi is a 501(c)(3), donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

To make a contribution, contact Executive Director Julie Mitchell at (808) 935-7844 x 116 or julie@hawaiimediation.org.  Donations may also be mailed to Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center, 101 Aupuni Street, Suite PH 1014- B-2, Hilo, HI 96720.

 

 

Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi Speaks with O’ahu Students on Practicing Peace

As a part of the Pillars of Peace Hawai’i program of the Hawai’i Community Foundation, O’ahu public and private school students were treated to a talk today with Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi at the Neil S. Blaisdell Center Exhibition Hall.

All Photos Courtesy of Pillars of Peace

All Photos Courtesy of Pillars of Peace

Before the talk, student entertainers, including Moanalua High School’s Brown Bags to Stardom winner, R.I.S.K.; Castle High School’s Brown Bags to Stardom winner, Ho’okipa; and 12-year-old singer, Ciana Pelekai wowed the crowd with their talents.

Ciana Pelekai

Ciana Pelekai

“In so many countries around the world, citizens are challenging their government’s misuse of power,” said Pam Omidyar, co-founder of the Pillars of Peace Hawai’i program. “Daw Suu reminds us that governance is to be in the service of others, to enable them to be educated, healthy, and work towards their full potential. She has proven, like Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, and dear Archbishop Tutu, that love and truth can move people more strongly than fear or coercion.”

Pam Omidyar

Pam Omidyar

Aung San Suu Kyi’s speech focused on the theme, “Peace Takes Courage and Compassion.” During her talk she spoke to topics ranging from her imprisonment, her beliefs on peace and compassion, and the importance of the next generation to be leaders in practicing peace. Following her speech, she answered students’ questions selected from submissions prior to the event.

Aung San Suu Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi’s speech focused on the theme, “Peace Takes Courage and Compassion.” During her talk she spoke to topics ranging from her imprisonment, her beliefs on peace and compassion, and the importance of the next generation to be leaders in practicing peace. Following her speech, she answered students’ questions selected from submissions prior to the event.

Aung San Suu Kyi

“Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit is a part of a series of global peace leaders who have visited our islands with the hope that they will take back what they have learned about our culture and their experiences as they work to cultivate a more peaceful society,” said Kelvin Taketa of the Hawai’i Community Foundation. “These leaders see students as being the foundation for building peace in the world. One of the hopes for the Pillars of Peace Hawai’i program is to help give a new generation the tools and inspiration to embrace peace.”

Pierre and Pam Omidyar, Aung San Suu Kyi and Kelvin Taketa

Pierre and Pam Omidyar, Aung San Suu Kyi and Kelvin Taketa. Photo by Pillars of Peace

The public was invited to tune in to a live stream of Aung San Suu Kyi’s student talk today on the Pillars of Peace website. For those who missed the live stream, the talk will be available beginning tomorrow for playback at www.pillarsofpeacehawaii.org.

“The most important thing that I heard was that love is not enough, it’s compassion,” said Ayami Hatanaka, a junior at ‘Iolani School and member of the ‘Iolani Peace Institute. “There are several factors when it comes to not only creating peace, but being cooperative. Humility is the key to being a good leader and a good person.”

Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi

Pillars of Peace Hawai’i, Rotary International, East-West Center, and the Myanmar Association of Hawai’i are co-hosting Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit to O’ahu.

 

Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi Shares Message of Peace with Hawai’i Leaders

Nobel Peace laureate tours Bishop Museum and exchanges ideas with local leaders on the many forms of peace.

Aung San Suu Kyi's 4

Nobel Peace laureate tours Aung San Suu Kyi tours the Bishop Museum – All Photos Courtesy of Pillars of Peace

Peace leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s first day of events in Hawai’i began today with a visit to the Bishop Museum hosted by Pillars of Peace Hawai’i. The tour of Bishop Museum provided an opportunity for Aung San Suu Kyi to gain a deeper understanding of Hawai’i’s rich culture and history and how these elements have shaped Hawai’i today. Upon her departure, Bishop Museum staff presented her with a special gift — a manele a’e (Hawaiian soapberry) seed lei made by local artist Marques Hanalei Marzan from a tree on the grounds of Bishop Museum.

Aung San Suu Kyi's - Pictures Courtesy of Pillars of Peace

Aung San Suu Kyi also attended a private luncheon at the East-West Center with local leaders. Immediately following the lunch, she participated in a business roundtable discussion, which brought together leaders in Hawai’i’s political and business spheres as they shared ideas on the rule of law, responsible tourism development and government issues. The purpose of the roundtable discussion was to spark dialogue on the roles of compassion, diversity and culture in practicing peace.

Aung San Suu Kyi's 5

“Having Aung San Suu Kyi participate in a cultural exchange provides all of us with an opportunity to continue to learn from other leaders and places around the world,” said Kelvin Taketa of the Hawai’i Community Foundation. “I was truly honored and humbled to hear her speak and learn from her leadership and unwavering commitment to peace.”

Aung San Suu Kyi's 6

Pillars of Peace Hawai’i is co-hosting Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit as part of the ongoing Hawai’i Community Foundation initiative, “Pillars of Peace Hawai’i: Building Peace on a Foundation of Aloha,” which launched in April 2012. Other organizations co-hosting Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit include Rotary International, East-West Center and the Myanmar Association of Hawai’i.

Aung San Suu Kyi's 7

The public is invited to tune in to a live stream of Aung San Suu Kyi’s student talk starting tomorrow at 10:25 a.m. HST on the Pillars of Peace website at www.pillarsofpeacehawaii.org. The talk will also be available for playback after the event.

Aung San Suu Kyi's 2

Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit is part of the ongoing Hawai’i Community Foundation initiative, “Pillars of Peace Hawai’i: Building Peace on a Foundation of Aloha,” which launched in April 2012 with the visit of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. One of the program’s goals is to bring global peace leaders to Hawai’i to exchange ideas about the many forms of peace that exist here in the islands and around the world. Through these visits, the program hopes to spark dialogue about the roles of compassion, diversity and culture as key components for practicing peace.

Aung San Suu Kyi's 3

In addition to hosting His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Pillars of Peace Hawai’i has sponsored peace leaders Archbishop Desmond Tutu and John Hunter, founder of the World Peace Game for students. Pillars of Peace Hawai’i is a program funded primarily by the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation, a $50 million charitable fund established in 2009 by Hawai’i residents Pierre and Pam Omidyar.

For more information about Pillars of Peace Hawai’i, please visit www.pillarsofpeacehawaii.org. For up-to-date information on Aung San Suu Kyi’s January visit, follow Pillars of Peace Hawai’i on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pillarsofpeace and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PillarsofPeace.

Pillars of Peace Hawai’i Welcomes Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi

Pillars of Peace Hawai’i – a program of the Hawai’i Community Foundation – announced today plans to co-host peace leader Aung San Suu Kyi on her visit to O’ahu this month. The trip, which will be Aung San Suu Kyi’s first visit to the islands, will allow her to share her message of peace and compassion while gaining an understanding of Hawai’i’s unique culture, history and aloha spirit. Other organizations co-hosting her visit include Rotary International, East West Center and the Myanmar Association of Hawai’i.

Aung San Suu Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi

While in Hawai’i, Aung San Suu Kyi will participate in several private events hosted by Pillars of Peace Hawai’i, including a speech titled “Peace Takes Courage and Compassion,” followed by a question and answer session with public and private high school students. Tickets are being distributed to students through their respective schools.

The general public is invited to view the student event online by tuning in to a live stream on the Pillars of Peace website at www.pillarsofpeacehawaii.org. For those unable to watch the live stream starting at 10:25 a.m., the talk will be available for playback after the event concludes.

“We can learn a great deal from Aung San Suu Kyi and her nonviolent struggle for democracy and human rights,” said Kelvin Taketa, president and CEO of the Hawai’i Community Foundation. “At the same time, the Pillars of Peace program creates an opportunity to share with global peace leaders Hawai’i’s unique example of multiculturalism to carry with them wherever they go around the world.”

Those wishing to hear Aung San Suu Kyi speak in person can purchase a ticket to the Rotary International’s Rotary Global Peace Forum dinner where Aung San Suu Kyi will deliver the keynote speech on Saturday, Jan. 26. More information on the Rotary Global Peace Forum is available at http://peaceforumhawaii.org/.

Aung San Suu Kyi’s visit is part of the ongoing Hawai’i Community Foundation initiative, “Pillars of Peace Hawai’i: Building Peace on a Foundation of Aloha,” which launched in April 2012 with the visit of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. One of the program’s goals is to bring global peace leaders to Hawai’i to exchange ideas about the many forms of peace that exist here in the islands and around the world. Through these visits, the program hopes to spark dialogue about the roles of compassion, diversity and culture as key components for practicing peace.

In addition to hosting His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Pillars of Peace Hawaii has sponsored peace leaders Archbishop Desmond Tutu and John Hunter, founder of the World Peace Game for students. Pillars of Peace Hawai’i is a program funded primarily by the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai’i Community Foundation, a $50 million charitable fund established in 2009 by Hawai’i residents Pierre and Pam Omidyar.

That's me on the far right taking his picture. (Photo by Dallas Nagata White)

That’s me on the far right taking his picture. (Photo by Dallas Nagata White)

For more information about Pillars of Peace Hawai’i, please visit www.pillarsofpeacehawaii.org. For up-to-date information on Aung San Suu Kyi’s January visit, follow Pillars of Peace Hawai’i on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pillarsofpeace and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PillarsofPeace

ABOUT AUNG SAN SUU KYI

Aung San Suu Kyi is a Member of Parliament of the Union of Burma and is a founding member of the National League for Democracy. Early in her career, she worked in the office of the United Nations Secretariat in New York and was a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for South East Asian Studies at Kyoto University and the Indian Institute for Advanced Studies in Simla. Following her return to Burma in 1988 and winning an election by popular vote, she was placed under house arrest until 1995, and again during 2000 to 2002 and 2003 to 2010. Aung San Suu Kyi has received more than 120 awards and honors internationally, including: Nobel Peace Prize (Oslo, Norway, 1991); Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding (India, 1995); Congressional Gold Medal (USA, 2008); Honorary Canadian Citizenship Parliament Hill (Ottawa, Canada, 2008); and Legion of Honor [Ordre national de la Legion d'honneur] (France, 2012).

Hawaii Community Foundation Announces Funds Released for West Hawaii Grant Projects

The West Hawai‘i Fund advisory committee, made up of local volunteers, awarded $63,375 to 16 organizations that contribute in diverse ways to improving the quality of life for residents in West Hawai‘i.

Hawaii Community Foundation

The West Hawai‘i Fund was established in 1990 to provide a stronger link between charitable donors and the specific needs of West Hawai‘i communities from Kohala to Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. Through the years, local citizens have created additional funds that are also distributed by the West Hawai’i Fund advisory committee including the Hartwell and Rebecca Carter Fund, the Robert C. and Helen F. Nichols Fund, the Arthur Mullaly Fund, and the Oscar and Ernestine Armstrong Fund.

Organizations receiving grants from these five funds include:

  • Friends for Fitness received $3,500 to provide much needed repair for the 1-mile long walking, jogging Makaeo Walking Path.
  • Habitat for Humanity received $5,000 in support of a specialized home repair and renovation program for Veterans currently living in sub-standard housing in West Hawai‘i.
  • Hawai‘i Forest Institute received $7,000 for their Aupaka o Wao Lama Forest Education Program to restore endangered dryland habitat and share its historical, cultural and scientific aspects with the West Hawai‘i Community.
  • Hawai‘i Learning Resource received $4,000 for their Summer Academic Enrichment Camps that will provide students with a fun, hands-on learning experience designed to inspire joy in learning for students with learning differences.
  • Holualoa Foundation for Arts received $4,000 for the creation of a multi-use performing arts and intimate concert area within the current Donkey Mills Art Center.
  • Hospice of Kona received $4,000 in support of their Patient Support Nakamaru Hale, their 5-bed residential care home.
  • Innovations Public Charter School Foundation received $5,000 for their Planting Wellness with Our Keiki program that provides healthy mini meals for aftercare students incorporating healthy food education, environmental stewardship and physical activity.
  • Ka Moku o Keawe Makahiki received $3,000 to engage a broad range of schools and community groups, utilizing Hawaiian Makahiki cultural practice and championship games to strengthen families around physical education, health, fitness and honest competition.
  • Kona Adult Day Center, Inc. received $4,000 for their Adult Day Care program which provides social and recreational programs and activities for impaired adults and respite for their families and caregivers.
  • Kona Hospital Foundation received $6,000 for their Panda Baby Warmer Project that will provide options for medical staff to administer safe, effective airway management of any life-threatening situations for infants.
  • Kona Pacific Public Charter School received $4,000 in support of their Supplemental Nutrition Program that provides breakfast and afterschool snacks and subsidizes lunch for students of disadvantaged families.
  • Miloli‘i Emergency Response Team received $3,000 for their Emergency Response Team to acquire the necessary equipment and supplies to support their community in the event of an emergency.
  • Moku O Kohala Royal Order of Kamehameha received $2,000 in support of the Hale Mua Cultural Group who will repair rock walls surrounding the Kamehameha Birth site monument that were damaged during the earthquake of 2006.
  • PATCH (People Attentive to Children) received $4,750 to provide training and technical support to early childcare providers in West Hawai’i.
  • Pukoa Kani Aina Community Development Corporation received $2,000 for their I-3 (Investment, Interdependence, and Impact) program that helps Native Hawaiian non-profits achieve their mission and become high impact organizations.
  • Waikoloa Dry Forest Institute received $2,305 for construction of an outhouse facility, four picnic benches for visitors, and a hand-washing station and sink to be located at the 275 acre dry forest restoration project in Waikoloa Village.

About the Hawai‘i Community Foundation

With 96 years of community service, the Hawai‘i Community Foundation is the leading philanthropic institution in the state. The Foundation is a steward of more than 600 funds, including more than 170 scholarship funds, created by donors who desire to transform lives and improve communities. In 2011, more than $44 million in grants and contracts were distributed statewide. The Foundation also serves as a resource on community issues and trends in the nonprofit sector.

 

Hawaii Community Foundation Announces Funds Released for East Hawaii Grant Projects

The East Hawai‘i Fund Advisory Committee, made up of local volunteers, awarded $17,000 from the East Hawai‘i Fund and the Fred Yokoyama Fund. These two funds aim to benefit the people and communities of East Hawai‘i, from Waipi‘o to Waiohinu.

Hawaii Community Foundation

With the help of KTA Superstores, the estate of Frederick Yokoyama and a group of local citizens, the East Hawai‘i Fund was established to provide a stronger link between charitable donors and the specific needs of East Hawai‘i. This regional fund will continue to grow through contributions, bequests and planned gifts from donors who want to respond to current and emerging community needs. The Fred Yokoyama Fund was created in 2010 to give back to the community where Mr. Yokoyama made his home and owned several successful businesses.  Both the East Hawai‘i Fund and the Fred Yokoyama Fund are component funds of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, a statewide, publicly supported grantmaking foundation.

Organizations receiving grants from these two funds included:

  • Big Brothers Big Sisters Hawai’i received $3,000 to support two school-based programs in addition to community-based matches of Bigs (mentor) and Littles (child) in East Hawai’i.
  • Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of East Hawai‘i received $2,000 to provide enhancement support (tutoring, summer school and intersession program fees, Winners Camp, sport fees and equipment) for children who have been abused or neglected.
  • Girl Scouts of Hawai‘i received $2,000 for their after school program to be offered in Honoka‘a.
  • Hilo United Methodist Church received $2,000 for the Peanut Butter Ministry which serves dinner twice weekly to men, women and children in Hilo.
  • PATCH (People Attentive to Children) received $3,000 to provide training and technical support to early childhood care providers in East Hawai‘i.
  • Special Olympics Hawai‘i received $3,000 for their Young Athlete Program for preschool children ages 2-5 as an introduction for new families to the resources and support available within Special Olympics.
  • The Arc of Hilo received $2,000 for their new Teens in Transition employment program aimed at assisting East Hawai‘i teens with special needs to develop necessary job skills and retain employment.

About Hawai`i Community Foundation

With 96 years of community service, the Hawai‘i Community Foundation is the leading philanthropic institution in the state. The Foundation is a steward of more than 600 funds, including more than 170 scholarship funds, created by donors who desire to transform lives and improve communities. In 2011, more than $44 million in grants and contracts were distributed statewide. The Foundation also serves as a resource on community issues and trends in the nonprofit sector.

 

Hawaii Community Foundation Announces Memorial Fund in Honor of Late Senator Daniel K. Inouye

Hawai’i Community Foundation announced today that the family of the late U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye have established a memorial fund in his honor. The fund was created at the request of Irene Hirano Inouye, and will continue to help the organizations and causes that the Senator supported over the years. Contributions can be made to the Daniel K. Inouye Fund, Hawai’i Community Foundation, 827 Fort Street Mall, Honolulu, Hawai’i 96813 or online at www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org.

Hawaii Community Foundation

“All of us here at the Hawai’i Community Foundation had the privilege of working closely with the Senator and his staff and witnessing the tremendous leadership and inspiration he provided to so many,” said Kelvin H. Taketa, Hawai’i Community Foundation president and CEO. “Beyond the legacy of what he did for our community, we will miss his courage, grace and humor.”

Inouye passed away on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 at the age of 88 from respiratory complications. He was the longest-living serving member of the U.S. Senate prior to his death, with 49 years of service.

 

Hawai’i Community Foundation Partnership Fuels Grassroots Restoration Efforts

The Hawai’i Community Foundation is pleased to announce that it has awarded $437,000 in grants to nine projects across the islands aimed at the protection and restoration of Hawai’i’s coastal areas. Funding for the projects is made possible through a three year partnership between the Hawai’i Community Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Restoration Center and the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation. The community-based grant program was started with the strong support of Senator Inouye, and actively bridges cultural and environmental stewardship efforts. Since 2009, the partnership has provided more than $1.5 million in funding to community organizations repairing fishponds, removing invasive species, and preventing polluted runoff in coastal waters on all major Hawaiian islands.

Grantees visit Kāko'o 'Ōiwi's 2011-2012 grant funded project -- Mahuahua 'Aio Hoi - He'eia Wetland Restoration. Click image above for a high-resolution version.

Grantees visit Kāko’o ‘Ōiwi’s 2011-2012 grant funded project — Mahuahua ‘Aio Hoi – He’eia Wetland Restoration.

“In Hawai’i clean water and healthy lands are fundamental to our quality of life,” said Josh Stanbro, director of Environment and Sustainability at the Hawai’i Community Foundation. “We commend these community groups for taking responsibility in their own backyards, and putting in countless hours to protect our most treasured sites.”

“This public-private initiative is a win-win, and demonstrates how much more we can do when we work together,” said Senator Daniel K. Inouye. “Engaging with the community upfront provides the best chance of an enduring and sustained effort. I will continue to advocate for a return of earmarks to be able to support efforts such as this because it is a justified and worthy federal investment.”

The Hawai’i Community Foundation is also proactively seeking funding from private donors and foundations to keep the successful grant program going in 2013 and beyond.

Hawai’i’s unique coastal resources are increasingly threatened by invasive species, climate change impacts, and inappropriate development. Wetlands and other coastal habitat help filter sediment and pollutants, replenish fishing stocks, and support traditional cultural practices. During the summer, the voyaging canoe Hōkule’a spent time at several of the restoration projects, lending her crew as volunteers working shoulder to shoulder with local residents because of the strong environmental-cultural ties.

Taro fields at Kāko'o 'Ōiwi.

Taro fields at Kāko’o ‘Ōiwi.

Specific goals for the partnership include restoration of coral reef habitat, coastal wetlands and estuaries, traditional coastal fishponds, riparian zones/stream habitat, and land-based sources of pollution mitigation. Coastal habitats support approximately 25 percent of Hawai’i’s reef fish, 32 percent of marine invertebrates, and 90 percent of stream animals that are found nowhere else on the planet.

“We know how hard our ancestors worked to keep things in balance,” said Kanekoa Schultz, whose Kāko’o ‘Ōiwi restoration project was a 2011-2012 grant recipient. “This grant is going to teach a new generation how to work to support the natural systems that in the end take care of us.”

Projects funded this year include:

  • “Loko ‘Eā Fishpond Habitat Restoration Project”- Undertaken by Alu Like, Inc., this project will restore the cultural, biological, and socio-economic prosperity of Loko ‘Eā Fishpond. The goal of the project is to conduct habitat and fishpond restoration utilizing community collaboration while integrating traditional Hawaiian knowledge.
  • “Bridging Land, Sea and Native Cultural Practices Through Restoration on Kaho’olawe Island”- Undertaken by the Kaho’olawe Island Reserve Commission and fiscally sponsored by Tri-Isle Resource Development Council, Inc., this project proposes a land-based restoration project that will help hold and improve soil health, prevent runoff, and improve water quality in the adjacent near-shore area.
  • “Watershed Restoration Program/ Mangrove Eradication Project Phase I”- Undertaken by Kaiola Canoe Club, the project will restore approximately one acre of the Huleia River riverbank which is being severely overgrown by red mangrove, reaching in some areas up to 40 feet in height.
  • “The Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps”- Undertaken by KUPU, this project will increase the number of Hawai`i Youth Conservation Corp members available to local conservation organizations, by working with over 40 conservation groups over six islands to help add capacity during both their summer and year-round programs.
  • “Invasive Marine Algae Removal at Maunalua Bay, O’ahu”-Undertaken by Mālama Maunalua, this project will train six new volunteer coordinators and four interns to focus on doubling the amount of community workdays that they can do in a year. As a result, one acre of Maunalua Bay will be cleared of invasive algae and several other benefits (maintenance on previously cleared areas, monitoring, recycling of algae as soil amendment, etc) will simultaneously occur.
  • “Anapuka Dune Restoration and Revegetation Study”- Undertaken by Moloka’i Land Trust, this project consists of partial assistance for the continued restoration of 45 acres in a coastal dune ecosystem, including habitat modifying invasive species removal, weed control, ungulate control, and restoration/replanting of native species to help offset sediment transport into the adjacent nearshore marine ecosystem.
  • “Streambed repairs to reduce silty run off at Nāpili Bay”- Undertaken by the Nāpili Bay and Beach Foundation, Inc. this project will remove woody invasive species from a 600 foot stream area in West Maui, and replant this area with native species. This will shore up the stream bank and help filter sediment before it emerges into Nāpili Bay.
  • “Coastal Fishpond Restoration at Kīholo, Hawai’i”- Undertaken by the Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i, this project will clear invasive vegetation from around the side and rear portions of two inland fishponds at Kīholo to increase juvenile fish habitat and pond water quality.
  • “Kahului Harbor Ho’aloha Beach Park and Shoreline Restoration”- Undertaken by the Wailuku Community Managed Marine Area and fiscally sponsored by Tri-Isle Resource Conservation & Development Council, Inc., this project will replant and restore approximately 2,500 feet of coastal shoreline, and begin reintroducing native limu in the nearshore water at Kahului. The project seeks to replant strategic areas and channel foot traffic in marked corridors to reduce coastal erosion and siltation of the nearshore water.

On the Web:
Hawai`i Community Foundation: www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org
NOAA Restoration Center: www.restoration.noaa.gov
The Castle Foundation: www.castlefoundation.org

 

Hawai’i Community Foundation Gives Students 4.5 Million Reasons to Apply for Scholarships

For more than 30 years, Hawai’i Community Foundation has provided Hawai’i’s students, young and young-at-heart, with an opportunity to attend college. They are once again making this possible. Hawai’i Community Foundation is opening its online application for Hawai’i students seeking financial assistance to fund their college or vocational education.

Hawaii Community Foundation

From Dec. 10, 2012 – Feb. 22, 2013, students can apply for one of the organization’s more than 170 scholarship opportunities by simply completing an online application atwww.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/scholarships. Hawai’i Community Foundation distributes $4.5 million in scholarships to students each year, with individuals receiving an average scholarship award of $2,200, making it the third largest private scholarship provider in the state.

“With the cost of college tuition rising, these scholarships help to ensure that Hawai’i’s students have an equal opportunity to achieve their dreams and seek a college education,” said Amy Luersen, director of philanthropic services at the Hawai’i Community Foundation. “With the help of our generous donors, we are pleased to offer hope for thousands of students.”

Students should expect to spend approximately 60 – 90 minutes to fill out and upload the required documents for the application. In addition to the application, students will be required to submit supporting documents, including: a full Student Aid Report (SAR) generated when completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), grade transcript, and personal statement. Some of the scholarships may include additional information, such as letters of recommendation or essays. These requirements can be determined by searching for specific scholarship opportunities on the site’s scholarship search function.

Through the online application, students are also able to send requests for letters of recommendation directly to their recommender’s email and can regularly view status updates of their requests.

Hawai’i Community Foundation’s scholarship program consists of more than 170 different scholarship opportunities established by generous individuals, families, businesses or organizations to assist Hawai’i’s residents in obtaining a college education. Some scholarship funds are part of the Hawai’i Community Foundation and some opportunities are through private foundations that contract with Hawai’i Community Foundation to administer their scholarships. Students apply online with one common application and, if eligible, can be awarded from one or more of these funds.

To submit an online application, search for a scholarship or find more information, please visitwww.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/scholarships.

 

Hawai’i Executive to Chair National Leadership Network for Nonprofits

Independent Sector, a leadership network for nonprofit organizations, foundations and corporate giving programs, recently appointed Hawai’i-native Kelvin Taketa, president and CEO of Hawai’i Community Foundation, as its board chair. As an organization striving to advance the common good in America, Independent Sector works towards promoting public policies and serves as an advocate for the philanthropic community.

Kelvin Taketa, Hawai’i Community Foundation president and CEO.

“Though we are thousands of miles from the mainland, it is important to stay connected with the public policies and changes occurring in our sector across the nation,” said Taketa. “Ultimately, these are the changes that will also affect us here in Hawai’i. It’s essential that we keep an open dialogue by sharing the challenges and successes we’ve experienced locally, while learning about the trends and issues nationally. In this way, I believe we can make an even greater impact in our community.”

Independent Sector is located in Washington D.C. and works nationally to create opportunities through its partnerships with approximately 600 organizations to lead, strengthen, and mobilize the nonprofit and philanthropic community. Together the coalition seeks to foster a just and inclusive society where citizens and institutions can work together to develop healthy and vibrant communities. Since the organization was founded in 1980, Independent Sector has sponsored revolutionary research, supported public policies within the independent sector, and created invaluable resources for organizations to achieve these goals.

“We are honored to have Kelvin as our new chairman and know that he will provide invaluable counsel and leadership to the board and the Independent Sector network,” said Diana Aviv, president of Independent Sector. “As an organization determined to make an impact in as many communities across the nation as possible, we believe having the unique perspectives of highly-respected leaders, such as Kelvin, is absolutely vital to our growth and success.”

Taketa brings more than 30 years of experience in the nonprofit sector and joined Independent Sector’s Board in 2007 as an opportunity to be a part of the network and advocate for nonprofit organizations, foundations, and corporate giving programs nationwide. Hawai’i Community Foundation is also a member of Independent Sector, joining in 2006. Since then, the Foundation has gained a better understanding of the current trends and issues in the nonprofit sector nationally, which provides valuable context for Hawai’i Community Foundation, as well as for the local community.

Hawai’i Community Foundation is a public, statewide, charitable services, and grant-making organization supported by donor contributions for the benefit of Hawai’i’s people. For more information about the Foundation, please visit www.HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org .

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Overview of His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s Visit to Hawaii

His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s visit to Hawai’i in April 2012 marked the launch of Hawai’i Community Foundation’s new initiative, “Pillars of Peace Hawai’i: Building Peace on a Foundation of Aloha.”

I had the opportunity to meet the His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Kualoa Park over on Oahu. That’s me on the far right taking his picture. (Photo by Dallas Nagata White)

The visit touched thousands of people and brought an important message of peace and compassion to Hawai’i and beyond.

From private discussions with native Hawaiian leaders, to public talks geared to students and the wider community, the Dalai Lama shared his insights and inspired us to consider our own daily practices of peace and aloha.

Hawaii Community Foundation’s West Hawaii Fund Currently Accepting Online Grant Proposals

The Hawai‘i Community Foundation is inviting community groups and nonprofit organizations to submit grant proposals for the West Hawai‘i Fund.  Established in 1990 to provide a stronger link between charitable donors and the specific needs of West Hawai‘i communities from Kohala to Hawaiian Ocean View Estates, the West Hawai‘i Fund is currently accepting online applications through October 1, 2012.  Through the years, local citizens have created additional funds that are also distributed by the West Hawai’i Fund advisory committee including the Hartwell and Rebecca Carter Fund, the Robert C. and Helen F. Nichols Fund, the Arthur Mullaly Fund, and the Oscar and Ernestine Armstrong Fund.
Hawaii Community Foundation
 
The West Hawai‘i Fund welcomes proposals aimed at improving the quality of life on the west side of Hawai‘i Island.  Applications for programs that address the critical needs of people affected by the current economy are strongly encouraged. 
 
To be eligible for a grant of up to $10,000, a group must be a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization – such as schools, units of government or neighborhood groups — or have a 501(c)(3) fiscal sponsor and clearly demonstrate a program or project’s benefit to the West Hawai‘i community. Community organizations without 501(c)(3) status are eligible to apply for a grant up to $2,000, provided the activities to be supported are charitable.
 
Proposal applications are being accepted online at:  www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org until 11:59 p.m. Oct 1, 2012.  Please direct any questions regarding the online process to the Honolulu office at 1-808- 537-6333 or toll-free at 1-888-731-3863.
 
About the Hawai`i Community Foundation
With 95 years of community service, the Hawai`i Community Foundation has become the leading philanthropic institution in the state.  Having a presence that stretches across all the islands and a reach covering a broad array of fields, the Foundation works with individuals, families, foundations, businesses and organizations to transform lives and improve Hawai‘i’s communities. In 2010, the Foundation provided more than $32 million in grants and contracts throughout Hawai’i on behalf of its clients and funds.

2012 Ho’okele Award Winners Announced

The Hawai‘i Community Foundation, in partnership with Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, announced at a reception last night, the recipients of this year’s annual Ho‘okele Award:

  • Jud R. Cunningham, chief executive officer, Aloha House, Inc.
  • David Fuertes, executive director, Ka Hana No‘eau
  • Connie Mitchell, executive director, The Institute of Human Services
  • Marjorie Ziegler, executive director, Conservation Council for Hawai‘i

“Thomas Layton, president of the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation (left) and Kelvin Taketa, president and CEO of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation (right), with 2012 Hookele Award recipients (l to r): Marjorie Ziegler, David Fuertes, Jud Cunningham, and Connie Mitchell”

The Ho‘okele Award was established in 2002 by the Hawai‘i Community Foundation and the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation and aims to acknowledge and strengthen the leadership in the islands’ nonprofit sector.

“We recognized that Hawai‘i was in danger of losing incredible executive talent in the nonprofit sector in part because many executives had little opportunity to renew themselves and marshal the stamina to continue their demanding work,” said Kelvin Taketa, president and CEO of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. “The Ho‘okele Award allows us to recognize, thank and reward our community’s truly selfless leaders.”

Over the past 11 years, $440,000 has been awarded to 46 recipients.  Of the 46 recipients, 42 remain in the nonprofit and public sectors.

Award recipients each receive $10,000 to be used for their own professional development and personal renewal. Recipients are selected based on nominations from the community and on their ability to think strategically and get results, bring different groups of people together, inspire others, make a difference in Hawai‘i, and enthusiastically share their knowledge with others.

This year’s 2012 Ho‘okele Award recipients are:

Jud R. Cunningham, Chief Executive Officer, Aloha House, Inc.
With over 40 years of experience as an administrator in behavioral health and human services, Jud Cunningham has worked in the Navajo Nation, Arizona, Washington State, and Hawai‘i.  Since 1995, Cunningham has served as the CEO of Aloha House.  The organization provides outpatient and residential treatment for persons addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs including comprehensive, family-centered behavioral health interventions to promote recovery and healthy lifestyles for individuals and families.

David Fuertes, Executive Director, Ka Hana No‘eau
For more than 30 years, David Fuertes has served in the State Department of Education as a teacher of Agriculture, a Career Technical Education West Hawai‘i District teacher, and a State Future Farmers of America secretary.  As the executive director of Ka Hana No‘eau, Fuertes has helped to develop innovative mentoring programs that meld traditional knowledge with contemporary technologies for Hawaiian youth in the rural North Kohala district of Hawai‘i Island.  The organization gathers older generation craftsmen and practitioners, and connects them with young students to preserve traditional knowledge, products and skills.

Connie Mitchell, Executive Director, The Institute of Human Services (IHS)
Connie Mitchell joined IHS, O‘ahu’s largest emergency homeless shelter as executive director in June 2006.  Mitchell brings to IHS a unique combination of skills derived from a long and diverse career that includes nursing, financial planning, pastoral work, and serving in a variety of management positions.  She also established the state’s first nurse-run rural mental health clinic in Ka‘ū on Hawai‘i Island.  IHS has expanded its homeless programs over the past five years, serving chronically homeless individuals with disabilities, including mental illness and substance abuse, formerly incarcerated, and families on the brink of homelessness.

Marjorie Ziegler, Executive Director, Conservation Council for Hawai‘i (CCH)
Marjorie Ziegler has always had a passion to help protect threatened and endangered species.  Prior to joining CCH as its first full-time employee in 2003, Zeigler worked with the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, KĀHEA: the Hawaiian Environmental Alliance, and as an archaeological assistant at Kailua District and Kualoa Regional Parks.  CCH is dedicated to protecting native Hawaiian plants, animals and ecosystems for future generations.

The San Francisco-based Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation was established in 1961 by Martha Alexander Gerbode, a descendant of one of the original five New England missionary families who came to Hawai‘i. The Gerbode Foundation makes grants of approximately $4 million a year with its activities focused in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Hawai‘i. Areas of interest include social justice, reproductive rights, the environment and the arts. Gerbode implements an award program similar to Ho‘okele that recognizes nonprofit leaders in the San Francisco area.

Please visit www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org for more information on the Ho‘okele Awards and a complete list of previous award recipients.

Richard Smart Fund Grants Now Available to the Waimea Community

Hawai’i Community Foundation announced today that grants benefiting the Waimea community on Hawai’i Island are now available through the Ho’ohui ‘O Waimea grant program.  The deadline for submitting applications is on August 13, 2012.

The grant program was established in honor of Richard Smart, a philanthropist who gave generously to support education, healthcare, culture and the arts and other charitable activities for the Waimea community. Smart’s legacy continues to support the community and lifestyle that he loved, a community where people know each other and care about maintaining the special qualities of Waimea.

The Hawai’i Community Foundation encourages residents and community organizations to submit grant proposals that help to make Waimea a better place to live.  Proposals may include (but are not limited to):

  • Community volunteerism and/or the scope of volunteer opportunities
  • Raising awareness of local civic issues affecting the residents
  • Collaboration between nonprofit organizations
  • Participation in community-building activities
  • Increasing communication between long-time and newer residents

To be eligible for a grant of up to $10,000, a group must be a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization – such as schools, units of government or neighborhood groups– or have a 501(c)(3) fiscal sponsor. Community organizations without 501(c)(3) status are eligible to apply for a grant up to $2,000, provided the activities to be supported are charitable.

Grants proposals must benefit the Waimea community and can include ongoing or one-time events. Grants awarded will be for a 12 month project.

Proposal information is available at www.hawaii.communityfoundation.org. All proposals should be mailed to Hawai’i Community Foundation, Attention: Richard Smart Fund, 827 Fort Street Mall, Honolulu, HI 96813 and must be post-marked on or before August 13, 2012.

In the first round of Ho’ohui ‘O Waimea grants in 2012, the following organizations received awards:

  • Big Island Mediation – in support of Community Mediation
  • Five Mountains Hawai’i – in support of Lifeplan Youth Leaders of Waimea
  • Friends of the Future – in support of the Better Choices program
  • Hawai’i Preparatory Academy – in support of the Hoku a’Aina Global Sustainability Local Applicability – Go Green Hui
  • North Hawai’i Community Hospital – in support of the Senior Fair
  • North Hawai’i Women and Children’s Services – in support of Summer Academic Enrichment Camps
  • The Earl & Doris Bakken Foundation – in support of the North Hawai’i Outcomes Project
  • The Kohala Center – in support of the Kohala Watershed Partnership Community Volunteer Program
  • The Kohala Center – in support of the Science and Technology High School for the Waimea Community
  • Waimea Preservation Association – in support of Coqui Free Waimea

About Hawai’i Community Foundation
With 95 years of community service, the Hawai’i Community Foundation is the leading philanthropic institution in the state.  The Foundation is a steward of more than 600 funds, including more than 160 scholarship funds, created by donors who desire to transform lives and improve communities.  In 2011, more than $44 million in grants and contracts were distributed statewide.  The Foundation also serves as a resource on community issues and trends in the nonprofit sector.