After Dark in The Park Programs for November

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in November. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

How Ecologists Pick a “Winning Team” in Forest Management. Natural ecosystems today are forever changed by the introduction and establishment of non-native species like never before. Some non-native species, however, may be playing important roles in the community in terms of providing ecosystem goods and services. Susan Cordell, senior scientist and research ecologist for the USDA Forest Service’s Institute of Pacific Island Forestry, explains the objective of the agency’s lowland tropical wet forest restoration project.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Nov. 5 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

NPS photo

NPS photo

Poke, From the Ocean to Your Table. Join April Kekoa and Teana Kaho‘ohanohano as they share their knowledge of preparing this popular island dish. Poke (pronounced “po-keh”) means “to slice or cut.” As a food dish served as an appetizer or snack, it usually consists of bite-size pieces of raw, fresh fish mixed with seaweed and kukui nut relish. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Nov. 13 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Darlene Ahuna in Concert. Vocalist and musician Darlene Ahuna is one of the most esteemed ambassadors of Hawaiian music. She is best known for her seamless falsetto renditions of traditional Hawaiian, hula and hapa-haole standards, yet she conveys a mesmerizing style all her own. Bestowed with numerous Na Hōkū Hanohano awards for her vocals, Darlene is a mainstay at the Merrie Monarch Festival, and has represented the island of Hawai‘i while entrancing audiences in Japan, and across the U.S. mainland.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Nov. 20 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kahuku Junior Ranger Day. Keiki of all ages are invited to join park rangers and explore the park’s southernmost section of Kahuku, in Ka‘ū. Connect the culture, people, and ‘āina through ‘oli, GPS, and compass on a short and easy walk. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge and love of the island’s native medicinal plants and how they are used to heal and nourish. Bring a refillable water bottle, sunscreen, hat, long pants, jacket and closed-toe shoes. At least one adult must accompany the children. The event and lunch are free, but registration is required. Call (808) 985-6019 by Nov. 15. Co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and the Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center.
When: Sat., Nov. 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: The Kahuku Unit is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Meet near the parking area.

Rescheduled! Large Earthquakes in the Hawaiian Islands: What You Need to Know.
The island of Hawai‘i has a long history of damaging, deadly, and costly earthquakes.  But did you know that large earthquakes are an ever-present danger throughout the state of Hawai‘i? And do you know what to do to protect yourself during the next big earthquake? Weston Thelen, a seismologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will present an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawai‘i, including current theories on why they occur, and what you need to know about future large earthquakes. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Nov. 26 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

The Art of Lei Making. Join Patricia Kaula as she shares the art of lei making. Hawaiians use lei for blessing crops, adornment for hula dancers, in healing and sacred rituals, and much more. Lei can be made from many items, including leaves, flowers, shells and seeds, and is offered to express friendship, love, respect, and honor. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Nov. 27 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

 

 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park October “After Dark in the Park” Programs Announced

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in October. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Large Earthquakes in the Hawaiian Islands: What You Need to Know
The island of Hawai‘i has a long history of damaging, deadly, and costly earthquakes.  But did you know that large earthquakes are an ever-present danger throughout the state of Hawai‘i? And do you know what to do to protect yourself during the next big earthquake?  Weston Thelen, a seismologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will present an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawai‘i, including current theories on why they occur, and what you need to know about future large earthquakes. He will also talk about Hawai‘i’s first Great ShakeOut, an earthquake drill that will take place on October 17, and how you can join in on the global effort to increase awareness of earthquake hazards and how to minimize their risks.

Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 1 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium 

‘Ohe Kapala (Bamboo Stamp). ‘Ohe kapala, or stamps made from bamboo, were used to create unique designs for traditional kapa. Today, these exceptional designs are used as patterns on all types of fabric.

'Ohe kapala/NPS Jay Robinson

‘Ohe kapala/NPS Jay Robinson

Join Keiki Mercado and Nikki Kiakona as they demonstrate how ‘ohe (bamboo) is carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn about this distinctive art form. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Ben Ka‘ili in Concert. Hawaiian musician Ben Ka‘ili has dedicated his life to playing and promoting Hawaiian music. He has shared Hawaiian music at festivals, including Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 33rd annual cultural festival last July, and through concerts and performances for more than 20 years.  Born on the island of Hawai‘i, Ka‘ili started playing Hawaiian music at the age of eight with his family, including his uncle, Uncle George Lanakilakeikiahiali‘i Na‘ope. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 16 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. 
Where:
Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

The Art of Hau. Learn the art of making cord and rope with hau, an indigenous plant in the hibiscus family. Malia Macabio and Kanoe Awong share the intricacies of gathering the material, preparing it, and braiding the fibers into useful and important pieces of Hawaiian art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 23 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Puna Junior Ranger Day. Keiki of all ages are invited to join park rangers and master lei hulu kumu, Aunty Doreen Henderson, for a hands-on demonstration and workshop on how to make kāhili, the Hawaiian feather standard. At least one adult must accompany the children. Sign up for this free program, which includes a free lunch. Registration is required. Call (808) 985-6011. Co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and the Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center.
When:
Sat., Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Maku‘u Farmer’s Market in Puna

Examining the ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua Ecosystem with Dr. Dieter Mueller-Dombois. In the early 1970s, a multidisciplinary team of forest biologists began a study of the intact native ecosystems in and around Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, in particular the ‘ōhi‘a lehua rainforest. Patches of dead ‘ōhi‘a stands were reported from the windward slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. Aerial photo analyses by a team of federal and state foresters revealed rapidly spreading ‘ōhi‘a dieback. A killer disease was suspected to destroy the Hawaiian rain forest in the next 15-25 years, yet that never happened. In his new book, Rainforest: Born Among Hawaiian Volcanoes, Evolved in Isolation: The Story of a Dynamic Ecosystem with Relevance to Forests Worldwide, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa professor Dieter Mueller-Dombois explains what really happened and why the ‘ōhi‘a lehua rainforest survived intact as witnessed today. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 29 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Hosts Next Volunteer Forest Restoration Project

The Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park hosts our next volunteer FOREST RESTORATION PROJECT on Saturday, September 28, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Volunteers needed to help control fountain grass along roadways in Hawaii Ocean View Estates (HOVE). Fountain grass increases fire potential, and the park is working to prevent its spread in HOVE and keep it from establishing in the Kahuku unit. Photo NPS

Volunteers needed to help control fountain grass along roadways in Hawaii Ocean View Estates (HOVE). Fountain grass increases fire potential, and the park is working to prevent its spread in HOVE and keep it from establishing in the Kahuku unit. Photo NPS

September 28th is National Public Lands Day. We will be joining the park and the Ocean View Community Association in controlling fountain grass along roadways in Hawaii Ocean View Estates (HOVE). Fountain grass increases fire potential, and the park is working to prevent its spread in HOVE and keep it from establishing in the Kahuku unit. Learn about the problems of fountain grass and its safe control from a member of the park’s Natural Resources Management team.

We will be driving the roads of HOVE looking for fountain grass along the roadside, with 2-3 people per vehicle. Volunteers who can drive their own vehicle will be helpful. The roads in HOVE are paved. For those coming from Volcano and the east side who would like to car-pool, we will meet at the Kilauea Visitors Center. There will be some space available in park vehicles.

Volunteers should be at least 12 years old, and able to walk up to a mile along roadways and rough roadsides.  Sturdy walking shoes and long pants and are required, along with gear for variable weather conditions (be prepared for sun or rain with a hat, raincoat, sunscreen, etc.) plus drinking water and a lunch.

Pre-registration is required. All participants will need to sign a Friends release form and a park volunteer form. For those under 18, an adult will need to co-sign.

***If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Patty Kupchak at forest@fhvnp.org or (808) 352-1402 by Monday evening, September 23. Please include your first and last name, email address, and a phone number where we can reach you at the last minute in case of cancellation***

 

Man Survives 115 Foot Fall Down Cliff in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Park rangers on Tuesday rescued a man who had been stranded overnight after climbing over a barrier and falling 115 feet down a sheer cliff behind Volcano House in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Search and Rescue Ranger John Broward stands at the location behind Volcano House where the man fell 115 feet onto Halemaumau Trail below.

Search and Rescue Ranger John Broward stands at the location behind Volcano House where the man fell 115 feet onto Halemaumau Trail below.

At approximately 4:45 p.m. on Tuesday, a hiker told park rangers at Kīlauea Visitor Center that she heard someone crying for help from the dense vegetation along Halema‘uma‘u Trail, which lies directly below the hotel. Although she thought it was a prank, she reported the cries anyway.

Rangers were able to locate the man, and the park’s Search and Rescue (SAR) Coordinator John Broward was lowered by helicopter and pulled him to safety as the sun began to set. The man was identified as 73-year-old Harry Osachy of Kurtistown.  Osachy is Micronesian and speaks little English, but told rescuers that he had fallen on Monday. The exact time is unknown.

Search and Rescue was able to get him out

Search and Rescue was able to get him out

Osachy was transported by ambulance to Hilo Medical Center, with injuries to his pelvis and shoulder. He had numerous scrapes and suffered from dehydration.

“Luckily, he landed in a dense thicket of native ‘uluhe fern, which broke his fall,” Broward said.

It is the thirteenth SAR mission at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park this year. Last year, park SAR crews responded to a total of 26 incidents.

“Once again, risky behavior by a visitor endangered the lives of our staff,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando, who was on site during the dramatic rescue. “We were able to execute an exemplary response from our cadre of specially trained first responders, and thankfully no one else was injured,” she said.

 

Hawaii Volcano Observatory Report – Kupapaʻu Point Ocean Entry Weak, But Still Active

Using a telephoto camera lens, an HVO scientist captured this view of the Kupapaʻu Point ocean entry on the morning of August 7.

HVO12

Although no lava flow activity was observed on the coastal plain near the ocean entry, small streams of lava still poured into the sea.

Zooming his camera in even more…. An up-close view of the easternmost lava streams entering the ocean.

hvo13

Reminder to all lava observers: Peering through a telephoto lens is the safest way to view Kīlauea Volcano’s ocean entry.

 

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park August 2013 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in August. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

UH CTAHR TARO

Kalo. The life of Hawai‘i’s indigenous people is closely linked with kalo, or the taro plant. According to the Kumulipo creation chant, kalo grew from the first-born son, Haloa. Kalo is believed to have the greatest life force of all foods and is a means of survival for Hawaiians. Join April Kekoa and Teana Kaho‘ohanohano as they share the history of kalo, plus its modern uses.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Aug. 14 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Diana Aki in Concent. The “Songbird of Miloli‘i,” Diana Aki, returns to Kīlauea with her band for an unforgettable evening of Hawaiian music. This Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning falsetto singer and ‘ukulele player is beloved by fans worldwide, and she regales audiences with her songs and storytelling. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., Aug. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Puna ‘Ohana Culture Day. Join local practitioners and learn the many craft uses of ti leaves. All materials will be provided. Children of all ages welcome. For more information, call (808) 985-6011. Free.

When: Sat., Aug. 24 from 10 a.m. to noon

Where: Makuu Farmer’s Market

Nā Wai Ola, The Living Waters: Harvesting the Heavens. Harvesting rainwater is a practice that has been going on for centuries all over the world. Rainwater is used for a variety of purposes, including domestic water supply. As global warming and growing populations increase the demand on our limited fresh water supplies, more and more places are turning to the ancient practice of harvesting rain. Atop Kīlauea volcano, rainwater collection is the standard way of life and is promulgated by the National Park Service.  Join University of Hawai‘i’s Trisha Macomber, author of Guidelines on Rainwater Catchment Systems for Hawai‘i,  as she presents options for insuring safe, clean drinking water for the future. Guests will receive all the FREE rainwater they can drink! Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Aug. 27 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Walk with the Friends in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

The public is invited to join the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes Park (FHVNP) for a “Sunday Walk in the Park” on August 11 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This monthly program on second Sundays is aimed at bringing together the members of FHVNP to share in the park’s beautiful trails.

Join volcanologist Cheryl Gansecki for a four-mile round-trip hike to explore features from Footprints Trail to Mauna Iki.

Walk in the park

At the Footprints trailhead, we will examine textural details of an ‘a‘a lava flow. Once we descend to the sandy desert, we’ll view footprints fossilized in the muddy ash in 1790.

As we approach Mauna Iki, we will see a pahoehoe lava field with unusual secondary mineralization that results in beautiful surface patterns.  From there, we’ll ascend Mauna Iki (little mountain) to explore a variety of volcanic features.  If we’re lucky, we may come across beautiful Pele’s Hair, wafted downwind in the plume of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. 

Cheryl Gansecki is a volcanologist with a Ph.D. in Geology from Stanford University and a B.A. in Earth Science and Archaeology from Wesleyan University. Her research includes volcanoes in Hawai’i, Greece, and Yellowstone National Park. She has worked as a geologist at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory mapping lava flows on Mauna Loa, a lecturer at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo; has given numerous lectures and led tours for teachers; Elderhostel and other educational programs in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Cheryl is co-owner and president of Volcano Video Productions, where she films and produces the ongoing “Eruption Update,” seen daily in the park’s Kilauea Visitor Center.

The hike is rated moderate, with four miles of hiking along hardened lava trails and a 100’ elevation gain.  Be prepared for the base 3,000’ elevation as well as for variable weather conditions, including sunny and windy.  Hikers should be in good condition, able to do without shade all morning in a remote, rugged area.

FHVNP’s “Sunday Walk in the Park” is free for Friends members, and non-members are welcome to join the non-profit organization in order to attend.  Annual memberships are $30 for individuals and $45 for families, and come with a variety of benefits.

To register, call Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes Park at 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org.

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park – Minimal Services Until Flossie Passes

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will remain open during Tropical Storm Flossie, but with minimal services.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

“We encourage people to shelter in place, and stay off roads. Our first priority is safety, and keeping our park employees and visitors out of harm’s way,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando.

Park officials have closed the following areas as of Sunday evening. Closures remain in effect until the storm has passed and conditions are safe:

  • Chain of Craters Road, from Devastation Trail parking lot to the coast
  • All backcountry areas, including Mauna Loa and cabins
  • Mauna Loa Road (known locally as “Mauna Loa Strip Road”)
  • All coastal areas, including, ‘Āpua Point, Keauhou, Halapē, and Ka‘aha
  • Kulanaokuaiki campsite
  • Nāpau campsite
  • Nāmakanipaio Campgrounds and A-frame cabins
  • Jaggar Museum (observation deck open but no rangers on duty)
  • Additional closures may be warranted as Flossie nears

Kīlauea Visitor Center will open Monday from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. with reduced staffing. Thurston Lava Tube will remain open. Volcano House and Kīlauea Military Camp are open.
The National Weather Service issued a Tropical Storm Warning for the islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i, Kaho‘olawe, Lāna‘i, and O‘ahu. Forecasters predict extremely heavy rains. As of 5 p.m. HST Sunday, Tropical Storm Flossie was approximately 320 miles east of Hilo, with sustained winds of 60 mph, and higher gusts expected. The storm is moving west at 18 mph.

For updates on Tropical Storm Flossie, go to http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/cphc/

For Civil Defense updates for the County of Hawai‘i, and the location of local shelters, go to http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/.

 

Volcano Art Center’s “Ever Changing Island” – Exhibit Features Clytie Mead, Hugh Jenkins and Stephanie Ross

Beginning tomorrow, Saturday, July 27, Volcano Art Center will present “Ever Changing Island” at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This latest exhibition features glass art from artists Hugh Jenkins and Stephanie Ross of the Big Island Glass Gallery juxtaposed against watercolors on prepared silk from artist Clytie Mead.

Featured artwork from VAC’s upcoming “Ever Changing Island” exhibit

Featured artwork from VAC’s upcoming “Ever Changing Island” exhibit

The lavishly detailed and divergent creations of both Honokaa-based art studios effortlessly combine to express the wondrous beauty found within the life cycle of Hawaii Island’s native flora. Join the artists for an opening reception from 5:00–7:00pm on July 27 and enjoy their works from 9:00am–6:00pm daily through September 8.

On Friday, August 16, Mead will conduct a live silk painting demonstration at the gallery from 10:00am–2:00pm, sharing her technique, materials and the inspiration behind her work.

“Mead’s intricate watercolor depictions of bud to flower to seed evoke unexpected emotion and connection to the subject when experienced through the fluid, abstract lense of glasswork offered by Jenkins and Ross,” states Emily Catey, VAC’s Gallery Curator.

Clytie Mead was practically born with a watercolor brush in her hand. As a small child in Pennsylvania, her parents would keep her busy painting while they worked in their home studio creating architectural renderings with watercolors. She later went on to earn a BFA in Painting from Carnegie Mellon University and an MA in Architectural History from Cornell. Mead lived in Southern California until relocating to Hawaii in 1986 and began working in watercolor on silk after studying with the prominent Chinese painter Jane Chao in 1999.

An ancient Asian technique, painting with watercolor on silk has become Mead’s primary focus. She brings a lifetime of experience as well as her own Western point of view to each piece which can take up to 30 hours to complete. Using conventional watercolor paints and brushes, Mead carefully selects imported Chinese silks which have been specially treated to resist blurring or running as her preferred canvas.

“Ever since I first came to Hawaii, I’ve been inspired by the lovely natural surroundings,” says Mead. “I have wanted to express my deep appreciation for the beauty of the many native Hawaiian plant species, and to bring them to the attention of people who may never have had a chance to see these rare and sometimes endangered plants.”

Mead’s work has been exhibited in Hong Kong and Japan, at the Wailoa Center, Firehouse Gallery and Volcano Art Center on Hawaii Island, and is included in many private collections around the United States. She has won several awards, including Best in Show for the Helen Cassidy Show at the Firehouse Gallery in Waimea. She now lives and works in Ahualoa near Honokaa with “her husband Pete, four dogs, and too many cats.”

Hugh Jenkins and Stephanie Ross are the dynamic husband and wife team behind Honokaa’s Big Island Glass Gallery. Even with an extensive collection of glasswork on display and new pieces constantly emerging, Jenkins and Ross proclaim “that perhaps the most creative thing we have done is to create this working relationship. With nature as a constant inspiration, the glass pieces are the natural outcome.”

Hugh Jenkins has pursued a life in glass work from his first introduction to glass blowing in 1969 at The Foundry in Honolulu, Hawaii. He carried his passion with him to the Punahou School in 1972 where he was an art teacher until 1998. Jenkins even spent his summers and sabbaticals engrossed in teaching glass at the Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina. Jenkins’ glasswork has evolved through several functional and sculptural phases, usually including highly polished optical surfaces.

Stephanie Ross earned her degrees first at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, and then received her graduate degrees from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She has taught art to high school and elementary school students since 1975. Ross was introduced to glass in 1995 and has worked in collaboration with her husband since 1996. She excels at design and color, while Jenkins often takes the reins on finishing the form.

Since 1996, the couple has focused in collaboration on a highly-colored series of bowls and vases while also helping other glass blowers improve the efficiency of their equipment. Their recent creations evolved as a direct response to their Hawaii Island life, depicting impressions of the volcanoes, forest, ocean and widely varying climate and light.

“Ever Changing Island” is free to the public, though park entrance fees apply and donations are accepted.  For more information, visit www.volcanoartcenter.org or contact the VAC Gallery at (808) 967-7565 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org.

Volcano Art Center (VAC) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974 to develop, promote and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii’s people through the arts and education.

Coming Up – Fourth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs

There’s still time to lace up, stretch out and start training for one of Hawaii’s most anticipated high-altitude endurance events of the year. Volcano Art Center’s fourth annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs is set for Saturday, August 17, 2013 with leadership once again provided by Kona Marathon’s Director Sharron Faff. Joining VAC’s aloha-filled leadership team this year is David Ranck, Kona Marathon’s Event Operations Race Director.

Rain Forest Run

Featuring a Half Marathon, 10K and 5K events, the Volcano Rain Forest Runs take place at 4,000 feet above sea level just minutes from Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii Island. Runners and walkers of all ability levels come back year after year for the cool temperatures and cooler views while traversing through the Hawaiian rain forest in Volcano Village. This year’s event is co-sponsored by The Cooper Center, the Kona Marathon, Lava 105 FM, Ultima Replenisher and BioAstin.

The 5K and 10K participants weave through the lush native forest on the mostly flat, tranquil roads of Volcano Village while the Half Marathon course continues into the hills of the surrounding ranch lands, treating racers to breathtaking panoramic views of the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Entry fees through July 31: Half Marathon–$75, 10K–$45, 5K–$30. Pricing starting August 1: Half Marathon–$85, 10K–$50, 5K–$35. Registration and complete race information is available at rainforestruns.com.

Online registration closes Wednesday, August 14 at 11:59pm HST. Packet pickup and late registration will be held on Friday, August 16 from 10:00am–6:00pm at VAC’s Niaulani Campus located at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road, or on August 17 from 5:30–7:00am at the neighboring Cooper Center located at 19-4030 Wright Road. There is no race day registration for the Half Marathon, and registration for all races closes at 7:00am.

Race day action begins with an Opening Ceremony at 6:30am near the Start/Finish line located at the Cooper Center. There you’ll also find live music, entertainment by the Hiccup Circus, plenty of activity and food booths, a silent auction and much, much more. Free races for keiki (children) include a 100 yard dash for ages 1-4 and a 200 yard dash for ages 5-7. Prizes are awarded for all keiki participants.

Runners and their guests are invited to a Welcome Luncheon sponsored by Homes and Land Magazine on Friday, August 16 from 11am–1:00pm at VAC’s Niaulani Campus. Enjoy complimentary pupus and wine, along with hourly guided tours of the Niaulani Rain Forest. Engage with local artists as they demonstrate their work in conjunction with a special art exhibition, “Footprints in the Forest.”

The traditional pre-race carbo-loading dinner will be held on Friday from 5:00–7:00pm at the Cooper Center. An all-inclusive pasta and salad buffet will feature meat, vegetarian and vegan options, and includes beverages and dessert. Cost is $15 per person, $8.50 for children under 10, credit cards are accepted. All proceeds benefit Volcano Friends Feeding Friends. Call Donna Stickel for tickets and details at (808) 967-7800.

Botanical World Adventures has generously donated two Zip Line Canopy Adventure Tours for the top male and female overall Half Marathon winners. The Zip Isle tour is an unforgettable thrill: safe, accredited, 7 stage zip line tour located at Mile Marker 16 north of Hilo.

Alaska Airlines is offering discounted rates to Hawaii Island in honor of the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Use Promo Code ECMU612 for travel to Hawaii Island valid August 10 through August 24, 2013.

All registered race participants receive 10% off at VAC Gallery in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and Rainforest Gallery at VAC’s Niaulani Campus from August 16 through August 19, 2013. Explore vacgallery.com/shop for online window shopping in advance.

Registration forms are available online at www.rainforestruns.com and at VAC’s Niaulani Campus. Event Team Volunteers are still needed for set up, clean up, poster distribution, safety, course direction, parking assistance on event day, staffing booths and more. For more information, contact Sharron Faff at (808) 967-8240 or race@volcanoartcenter.org.

Volcano Art Center (VAC) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974 to develop, promote and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii’s people through the arts and education. VAC hosts this event annually, creating a community event that everyone can participate in. Everyone is invited to join as a runner, walker, volunteer or spectator.

 

Hawaiian Songwriting Retreat August 2-4, 2013

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering a three-day Hawaiian music songwriting retreat for just $25, from Friday, Aug. 2 through Sunday, Aug. 4 with Hawaiian music, language and haku mele (Hawaiian song) experts Kenneth Makuakāne and Kaliko Trapp-Beamer.

Kenneth Makuakane

Kenneth Makuakane

The Friday, Aug. 2 workshop runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Sat., Aug. 3 and Sun., Aug. 4 both begin at 8 a.m. and finish at 4 p.m.

Advance registration required. To register, contact Elizabeth Bell at (808) 985-6019 or email Elizabeth_bell@nps.gov no later than July 25.

The retreat will be held in the park at the summit of Kīlauea. Budding songwriters will find inspiration in this wahi kapu (sacred place), among the towering koa and ‘ōhi‘a lehua trees, over fields of ropy pāhoehoe lava, and in the awe-inspiring eruptive glow from Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Also inspirational are the retreat’s accomplished teachers. Kenneth Makuakāne is a multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award winner, along with his group, The Pandanus Club. He’s a prolific songwriter (1,500-plus songs), producer of more than 100 albums, and collaborator who has worked with virtually all of the stars of Hawaiian music over the years.

Kaliko was raised as the hānai son of Hawaiian cultural expert Aunty Nona Beamer (1923-2008), learning Hawaiian chant, storytelling, traditional protocol, family songs, and stories. He currently teaches Hawaiian language courses at the University of Hawai‘i in Hilo, and helps coordinate the Beamer Family Aloha Music Camp. He is the President of the Mohala Hou Foundation dedicated to “preserve and perpetuate Hawaiian culture through education and the arts.”

The three-day Hawaiian songwriting retreat is sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park July 2013 – Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in July. All programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Hawaiian Hula Presented by Haunani’s Aloha Expressions. This entertaining hula group is comprised of native Hawaiian kāne and wāhine kūpuna, or elders, ranging from 70 to over 90 years old. For years, they have shared the aloha spirit by welcoming malihini (visitors) on cruise ships arriving at the Port of Hilo, and at Hilo International Airport.

The kūpuna also entertain on a regular basis for the patients at the Life Care Center of Hilo, Hale ‘Anuenue, Extended Care, Hawai‘i Island Adult Day Care, Aunty Sally Kaleohano Lū‘au House Senior Program and more. They won overall at the Kūpuna Hula Festival with the song, Tutu E. They also won the Moku o Keawe competition on numerous occasions. They make all of their own colorful costumes and lei, singing and dancing hapa-haole hula and have performed at the park’s annual cultural festival on numerous occasions. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., July 17 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

A train with the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway plies the rails between Hilo and the Hamākua Coast. Photo courtesy of the Laupāhoehoe Train Museum.

A train with the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway plies the rails between Hilo and the Hamākua Coast. Photo courtesy of the Laupāhoehoe Train Museum.

All Aboard! The Laupāhoehoe Train Museum (www.thetrainmuseum.com) mission is to emphasize the history of railroads in Hawai‘i and to preserve, promote, and protect the community interests of the Hilo-Hamākua Coast.  Many visitors – and residents – are surprised to learn that there were trains in Hawai‘i.  Learn the history of the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway (the only standard gauge train in the islands), the impact of the 1946 tsunami, and the development of the train museum which started in 1995.  Museum treasurer Doug Connors will discuss the history of the railroad on the island of Hawai‘i, the sugar plantations, and the development of the Hamākua Coast. Free.

When: Tues., July 30 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Park Rangers Rescue Endangered Plants

It’s not always lost or injured hikers who get rescued by park rangers.

Image shows the pit cater in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where the endangered plant search and rescue mission occurred June 26, 2013. NPS Photo/Mark Wasser

Image shows the pit cater in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park where the endangered plant search and rescue mission occurred June 26, 2013. NPS Photo/Mark Wasser

Rangers from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park rappelled nearly 200 feet into a remote pit crater last week to “rescue” seeds and cuttings from four extremely rare Hawaiian plants in the national park. The park will use the seeds and cuttings to help reestablish these species.

During the mission, seeds and cuttings from hāhā (Cyanea stictophylla), a federally endangered shrub found only on Hawai‘i Island, were carefully collected. This stunning plant is extremely rare, and in 1996, only 20 plants were estimated to survive in the wild.

NPS Photo/Jon Maka'ike

NPS Photo/Jon Maka’ike

Seeds and cuttings from other rare species collected included a species related to hāhā, Cyanea pilosa, an odorless Hawaiian mint (Phyllostegia sp.), and a native shrub in the African violet family, ha‘iwale (Cyrtandra lysiosepala).

Although a 4,000-foot elevation and the steep, sheer walls of the forested pit crater aid in protecting its ecology, those conditions make it challenging to retrieve cuttings and seeds. Two specialized teams from the national park, the Natural Resources Management rappel team and the Search and Rescue team, descended into the crater, retrieved the seeds and cuttings, and returned safely to the surface – a 12-hour mission.

Plants shown is closeup of Cyanea stictophylla flowering. This individual was collected from the Pit Crater a few years ago, and has been growing in a park greenhouse since. It flowered and fruited this year. NPS Photo/Mark Wasser

Plants shown is closeup of Cyanea stictophylla flowering. This individual was collected from the Pit Crater a few years ago, and has been growing in a park greenhouse since. It flowered and fruited this year. NPS Photo/Mark Wasser

Joining rangers were members of Hawai‘i County Fire Department and Pōhakuloa Training Area’s fire management team. This enabled the project ample contingency resources in the event of an incident, and fosters interagency cooperation that will be seeds in themselves for future mutual assistance.

USGS Report – Lava Flows Near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and Ocean Entry Continues

Two ocean entry points remain active near Kupapaʻu Point, near the boundary of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

USGS Photo

USGS Photo

The eastern entry has produced a larger plume than that at the western entry, which tends to be weak and wispy. Today several small breakouts were active just inland of the eastern entry point, creating a narrow cascade of lava pouring down the sea cliff.

This photo looks south towards Puʻu ʻŌʻō, where a vent is supplying lava to the Kahaualeʻa II flow, north of the cone.

USGS Photo

USGS Photo

This slow-moving flow has reached the forest line, producing small scattered brush fires.

A close-up of the Kahaualeʻa II flow burning vegetation at the forest line, just north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

USGS Photo

USGS Photo

The flow consists of numerous slow-moving pāhoehoe lobes.

The summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater remains active.

USGS Photo

USGS Photo

The lava lake is within the Overlook crater (the source of the gas plume), which is in the southeast portion of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater.

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park June 2013 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in June. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Hawaiki Rising: Hōkūle‘a, Nainoa Thompson and the Hawaiian Renaissance. Author Sam Low tells the story in the words of the men and women who voyaged aboard the Polynesian sailing canoe,  Hōkūle‘a.

Hawaiki Rising

The crew members grew up at a time when their Hawaiian culture was in danger of extinction and their future in their own land was uncertain. Overcoming fear by trusting in the vision of islands rising from the sea, Nainoa Thompson and his crew became the first Hawaiians to navigate the Pacific without charts or instruments in a thousand years. Join Sam Low for a special evening celebrating the release of his new book. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., June 4, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Wai‘ōhinu Coastline. The Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund (www.wildhawaii.org) and volunteers have been working on conservation issues along the Wai‘ōhinu coastline in southeast Hawai‘i since 2001.

Waiohinu

Perhaps best known for their marine debris removal efforts, they have also been active with anchialine pool restoration, hawksbill (honu‘ea) sea turtle research, and coastal strand restoration projects in this remote region in Ka‘ū. Marine biologist and HWF project coordinator, Megan Lamson, will discuss the unique natural and cultural resources of this region, share the progress of their conservation work, and present some opportunities to participate in upcoming volunteer events.

When: Tues., June 25, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Volcano Art Center Introduces Summer Sunset Hula

“Hula Arts at Kilauea” program erupting in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Volcano Art Center is about to turn up the heat at Kilauea Volcano. Starting this Friday, May 24 and running monthly through August, “Sunset Hula” performances by Halau Kahula O Nawahine Noho Pu`ukapu will light up the pa hula (stone platform) near the VAC Gallery in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Sunset Hula

Kilauea, one of the world’s most active volcanos, has been continuously erupting lava and thrilling visitors and park staff following a major activity surge in March 2008. A vigorous, towering plume of volcanic gas churns out of Halema’uma’u Crater throughout the day and as the sun sets, the plume’s reflection of the lava glowing below sets the twilight sky on fire. This nightly occurrence draws a huge audience to the best viewing areas surrounding the Jaggar Museum, where the fiery phenomena can be enjoyed with all five senses.

Four evenings this summer, Volcano Art Center (VAC) aspires to enhance the lava glow experience by introducing a special hula performance just before sunset. The following dates and times were chosen specifically for their closeness to the full moon cycle and actual sunset: May 24 at 6:00pm, June 21 at 6:00pm, July 26 at 6:30pm, August 23 at 6:15pm.

Sunset Hula3

Hula is widely recognized as one of the most treasured elements of Hawaiian cultural heritage. VAC has made an intentional effort since 1980 to perpetuate the ancient art of hula kahiko, welcoming an extensive variety of halau (troupes) and kumu hula (teachers) to share their dramatic portrayals of hula through dance, oli (chant) and mele (song).

“We are thrilled to have the dancers of Halau Kahula O Nawahine Noho Pu`ukapu performing under the direction of kumu hula Ana Nawahine Kahoopii,” states Julie Callahan, VAC’s Hula Program Coordinator. “Their movement is pure poetry come to life.”

Sunset Hula

This inspired outdoor presentation will take place rain or shine, and the audience is encouraged to bring a sitting mat, dress in warm, layered clothing, and come prepared for inclement weather. Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service should call (808) 967-8222 or email julie@volcanoartcenter.org.

“Sunset Hula” is the latest addition to VAC’s expanding “Hula Arts at Kilauea” program, supported in part by the County of Hawaii Department of Research and Development and the Hawaii Tourism Authority. All events are free, though donations are welcome and park entrance fees apply. For more information on Hula programs through Volcano Art Center, visit volcanohula.com.

Volcano Art Center (VAC) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974 to develop, promote and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii’s people through the arts and education.

 

Record of Decision for Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is pleased to announce that the Record of Decision for the Plan for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates has been signed. The Record of Decision describes the alternative the National Park Service (NPS) has selected to implement and why, and completes this important planning effort for the park.

The base of an ‘ōhi‘a lehua tree in Kahuku badly damaged by non-native ungulates. NPS Photo

The base of an ‘ōhi‘a lehua tree in Kahuku badly damaged by non-native ungulates. NPS Photo

The plan will provide a park-wide framework to systematically guide non-native ungulate management activities in a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery and provides desirable conditions for active ecosystem restoration, and supports protection and preservation of cultural resources.

The NPS’s preferred alternative includes a progression of management phases, monitoring, and considerations for the use of management tools; a population objective of zero non-native ungulates, or as low as practicable, in managed areas; complete boundary fencing for Kahuku and ‘Ōla‘a rainforest; and potential use of localized internal fencing to assist in the control of non-native ungulates. Control techniques would be primarily lethal, but non-lethal techniques could also be considered. Volunteer programs would continue, but modifications would be required for lethal removal programs to meet current NPS practices. The plan/EIS is available on the web at http://www.nps.gov/havo/parkmgmt/plan.htm

The Record of Decision has been published on the National Park Service Planning, Environment, and Public Comment website at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/havo_ecosystem_rod. A copy of the Record of Decision may also be requested by contacting the park at One Crater Rim Drive, P.O. Box 52, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718; or by phone at (808) 985-6026.

 

 

Island Youth Earn Summer Internships at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Nearly 50 Hawai‘i Island high school youth have completed training for eight-week summer internship programs with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park starting in June.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Entrance

Graduation ceremonies were held on Thursday, May 9th, at the Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus and again on Friday, May 10th.

The park’s non-profit partner, Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, was awarded grants from the Cooke Foundation, Ltd., the Victoria S. and Bradley L. Geist Foundation, Kamehameha Schools ‘Āina Education Program,  and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association to continue the park’s Youth Ranger Internship Program (YRIP), now in its fourth successful year.

In addition, generous donations from Volcano Art Center, KTA Superstores, Target, Nui Pohaku, and Safeway will support the graduation ceremony.

“We are so grateful to our community for embracing this life-changing program. Over $90,000 has been donated to give these great kids a chance to make a real contribution to caring for their park,” said Park Ranger Kūpono McDaniel, who oversees the program. “I have really enjoyed getting to know these kids from Ka‘ū, Pāhoa, and Kea‘au high schools and Hawai‘i Academy of Arts and Science, and now we will get to see them in action,” he said.

The Youth Ranger Internship Program provides education and career preparation to youth in rural East Hawai‘i. Youth train with park rangers in six different divisions within the park, including Interpretation, Natural Resources, Cultural Resources, Maintenance, Protection, and Administration. After training, as many as 33 successful candidates will be hired to these divisions.

“The Youth Ranger Internship Program is designed to empower local students to affect change in the world and to expose them to meaningful career options. The skills they learn will make them better candidates for any career they choose to pursue,” McDaniel said.

 

The Volcano House Story – Restoring History to Hawai‘i’s Oldest – and Newest – Hotel

The beloved Volcano House will fully reopen on the rim of Kīlauea caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park next month, following a multi-million dollar upgrade and completing yet another chapter in the epic history of this iconic hotel.

NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

Soon, guests will stroll through the lobby, where polished concrete floors of deep jade have been restored to their 1940s luster, and into the Grand Lounge. Flames from the original lava rock fireplace will warm the lobby and cast flickering light upon the imposing bronze of volcano goddess Pele, sculpted by Honolulu artist Marguerite Blassingame. A few more steps will reveal an expansive, comfortably appointed sitting room with spectacular views of Kīlauea and fuming Halema‘uma‘u Crater beyond large picture glass windows.

While temporary shelters on Kīlauea predate the 1824 grass hut built by Chiefess Kapi‘olani and her entourage, it was in 1846 that Hilo resident Benjamin Pitman, Sr. built a grass house, and christened it “Volcano House.” The name stuck, and the first substantial wooden structure to welcome guests at Kīlauea was built in 1877. (Eventually, this one-story building was relocated, repurposed, and currently houses the Volcano Art Center). Famed writers Mark Twain, Isabella Bird and Robert Louis Stevenson were among guests in the 1877 building, as were King David Kalākaua, and French microbiologist, Louis Pasteur.

The Volcano House in 1947, a historic landmark overlooking Kīlauea Crater, east side. NPS Photo

The Volcano House in 1947, a historic landmark overlooking Kīlauea Crater, east side. NPS Photo

In 1895, Greek-born George “Uncle George” Lycurgus acquired the Volcano House, and several structural evolutions ensued, including the construction of an ornate, two-story Victorian-inspired building that served many distinguished guests. Visitors included President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1934 (the first U.S. president to visit Hawai‘i), Amelia Earheart, and Princess Victoria Ka‘iulani.

In 1940, a fire from an oil burner destroyed the Victorian-style Volcano House. No lives were lost, but the entire hotel was a complete loss. Undaunted, Uncle George negotiated the construction of a new hotel with the park some 200 yards from its former site. In late 1941, the new Volcano House, designed by Maui-born architect Charles W. Dickey, was unveiled with great fanfare on the crater rim – and it is unveiled again in 2013 in the historic character of the 1940s. Uncle George’s name, flair for hospitality, and affinity towards volcano goddess Pele, will continue to define the character of Volcano House.

Historic photo taken February 1966. NPS Photo/Wm Robenstein.

Historic photo taken February 1966. NPS Photo/Wm Robenstein.

The 33-room hotel is owned by the National Park Service, and is managed under contract by Hawai‘i Volcanoes Lodge Company, LLC, who also manage Nāmakanipaio Campground and 10 A-frame cabins. While the views from Volcano House of the active volcano may be distracting, the careful observer will note the restoration of canec ceilings in the comfortable guest rooms, appointed with historic crown moldings. Prints by local artist Marian Berger of native birds in the Audubon style of the era adorn the walls. Original tiled hearths in three rooms were upgraded with electrical fireplaces.

Outside, two new decks overlook Kīlauea caldera. Indoors, guests can have a seat at the lovingly restored original koa wood bar in Uncle George’s Lounge, where another bronze sculpture depicting Pele’s vengeance graces a historic fireplace.

If Uncle George were alive today, perhaps he’d marvel over the coincidental return of Pele to her home at Halema‘uma‘u Crater, which began to erupt again in 2008, and to the return of guests to historic Volcano House.

After Dark in the Park at Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in May. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

  • Lei Making, Wili-Style. Volcano resident and hula student Kanoe Awong shares the traditional wili style of lei making using liko lehua. Learn how to transform the leaves and flower buds of the ‘ōhi‘a lehua tree into beautiful lei. These trees are currently in bloom throughout the park, and its signature red blossom is the official flower of the island of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free. When: Wed., May 8 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Whose footprints are these? (NPS Photo)

Whose footprints are these? (NPS Photo)

  • Whose Footprints Are These Really? Research suggests the story behind the fossilized human footprints in the Ka‘ū Desert may be more complex than originally thought. Footprints found in desert ash layers were believed to have been created in 1790 by the army of the Hawaiian Chief Keōua on their way back from battle. While in the area, Kīlauea erupted, sending suffocating ash down on one group. Others made it out alive, leaving their footprints in the then-wet ash. The ash dried, forever memorializing this event…or did it? Join Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura as she examines fascinating geologic evidence that may indicate much more prehistoric activity in the area. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free. When: Tues., May 14 at 7 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
  • Lei Making, Hilo-Style with Ti Leaf. Malia Macabio and Amy Kaawaloa demonstrate how to make the Hilo style of lei by twisting two strands of ti leaves together. Hula dancers use lei lā‘ī (ti leaf lei) to adorn their wrists and necks. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free. When: Wed., May 22 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai