21-gun salute, “Taps”, Candle-Lighting Ceremony Part of Tribute to HPD Officers Killed in Line of Duty

Members of the Hawaiʻi Police Department and the public celebrated Police Week on Monday (May 12) at the Hilo police station. A 21-gun salute, “Taps” and a candle-lighting ceremony were part of the tribute to the four Hawaiʻi Police Department officers killed in the line of duty since 1918: Manuel Cadinha (1918), William “Red” Oili (1936), Ronald “Shige” Jitchaku (1990), and Kenneth Keliipio (1997).

Candles burn during a Police Week ceremony in honor of Officers Manuel Cadinha, William “Red” Oili, Ronald “Shige” Jitchaku and Kenneth Keliipio.

Candles burn during a Police Week ceremony in honor of Officers Manuel Cadinha, William “Red” Oili, Ronald “Shige” Jitchaku and Kenneth Keliipio.

During the ceremony, Chief Harry Kubojiri said that Momi Cazimero, the sister of Ronald “Shige” Jitchaku, has been working to erect a memorial for the Police Department’s fallen officers and that she is optimistic construction will commence soon.

Chief Kubojiri said Cadinha, Oili, Jitchaku and Keliipio are among 20,000 law enforcement officers nationwide who have been killed in the line of duty. “The sacrifice of our four brother officers will never be forgotten,” he said.

The chief also acknowledged Officer Joshua Gouveia and Officer Garrett Hatada, who were shot and injured last year while responding to a report of gunshots in Hilo. Both officers have since returned to work.

Hawaiʻi County Managing Director Wally Lau, who was representing Mayor Billy Kenoi, said in his opinion every day should be Police Week. “We should remember and we should say thank you,” he said.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation designating May 15th as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which it falls as Police Week.

Another Police Week ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday (May 14) at the Kona police station. The public is invited to attend.

Results and Analysis of Hawaii Police Departments 2013 Community Satisfaction Survey

The analysis of the results of the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s 2013 Community Satisfaction Survey and the police chief’s responses to the public’s most common individual comments are available for inspection on the Police Department’s website.

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Chief Harry S. Kubojiri said he appreciates the time community members took to participate in the survey, which ran in May.

“We particularly thank participants for their individual comments, as these will serve to strengthen our department by pointing out ways we can better deliver our services and by highlighting issues that we might not have considered,” Kubojiri said. “We are ever mindful that our department’s effectiveness is ultimately determined by the confidence and cooperation of the community we serve.”

On the Community Satisfaction Survey page of the department’s website, the public can find links to the survey summary, an analysis of the responses to multiple-choice questions, and Chief Kubojiri’s responses to the most Frequently Asked Questions raised in the survey by individual comments.

(The following Analysis was provided by the Police Department)

Overall Survey Results

  • Overall, positive responses to survey questions outnumbered negative responses in all questions but one. For that question (“I am satisfied in the way the Hawaiʻi Police Department responds to crime in my community”), 34.4 percent of participants had a positive response while 41.6 percent had a negative response. Those figures are still better than they were in 2010, when 32.2 percent of participants gave a positive response to the same question and 41.8 percent gave it a negative response.
  • Positive responses about police personnel improved overall compared with the previous survey conducted in 2010. This is the case despite respondents giving lower positive responses to the questions “The island of Hawaiʻi is a safe place to live” (down 6.9 percent) and “The island of Hawaiʻi is a safe place to visit” (down 3.9 percent.)
  • Satisfaction with civilians ranked higher than satisfaction with sworn officers in every category.

Police Officer Contact

  • When it came to questions about contact with a police officer, positive responses improved this year for every question except “The officer(s) I had contact with made me feel comfortable,” which remained the same as in the 2010 survey (50.5 percent). The largest improvement for police officers (up 4.1 percent) was in response to the question “The officer(s) I had contact with demonstrated integrity” (53.3 percent). The highest positive response was to the question “The officer(s) I had contact with demonstrated professionalism” (59.0 percent). The lowest positive response about officers was to the question “The officer(s) I had contact with helped resolve my situation” (35.7 percent), but it was still 2.8 percent more positive than in 2010
  • Negative responses about contact with police officers were less negative than in 2010 in all but three questions. Those were “The officer(s) I had contact with demonstrated integrity (22 percent gave a negative response compared with 21 percent in 2010), “The officer(s) I had contact with paid attention to details (28.1 percent gave a negative response compared with 24.3 percent in 2010) and “The officer(s) I had contact with made me feel comfortable (27.5 percent gave a negative response compared with 26.3 percent in 2010.)

Contact with Civilian Employees

  • When it came to questions about contact with a civilian employee, positive responses improved this year for every question. The largest improvement (up 10.9 percent) was in response to the question “The civilian(s) I had contact with paid attention to details” (69.3 percent). The highest positive response was to the question “The civilian(s) I had contact with expressed interest in helping me” (74.9 percent). The lowest positive response about civilian employees was to the question “The civilian(s) I had contact with showed concern for my safety” (48.8 percent) but it was still 8.0 percent more positive than it was in 2010.
  •  Negative responses about contact with civilian employees were less negative than in 2010 in all but four questions. Those were “The civilian(s) I had contact with expressed interest in helping me” (13.0 gave a negative response compared with 12.2 in 2010), “The civilian(s) I had contact with paid attention to details” (13.6 percent gave a negative response compared with 13.4 percent in 2010), “The civilian(s) I had contact with made me feel comfortable” (13.0 percent gave a negative response compared with 12.5 percent in 2010) and “The civilian(s) I had contact with helped resolve my situation (16.3 percent gave a negative response compared with 16.1 percent in 2010).

Overall Satisfaction with the Police Department

  • Positive responses about overall comfort/satisfaction with the Police Department improved in every category. The largest improvement, which was also the highest positive response in this category, was to the question “I am comfortable contacting the Hawaiʻi Police Department to report a crime” (70.5 percent compared with 63.8 percent in 2010). The lowest positive response in this category was to the question “I am satisfied in the way the Hawaiʻi Police Department responds to crime in my community” (34.4 percent) but it was still 2.2 percent more positive than in 2010.
  • Negative responses about overall comfort/satisfaction with the Police Department were less negative than in 2010 in all questions but two. Those were “I am confident in the ability of the Hawaiʻi Police Department to serve my needs (35 percent gave a negative response compared with 31.3 percent in 2010) and “I believe the Hawaiʻi Police Department does a good job in keeping the island of Hawai‘i Safe (29.8 percent gave a negative response compared with 27.7 percent in 2010).

Individual Comments

  • The final open-ended comments block was answered by 452 persons. From the most common comments, the Police Department created Frequently Asked Questions with responses from the chief.

(See link to the Frequently Asked Questions and the chief’s responses from the 2013 survey.)

 

 

HI-PAL and “Click It Or Ticket” Hosting August Events

The Hawai’i Police Department is hosting several HI-PAL and “Click It Or Ticket” events during the month of August.

Officer Joseph Botelho Jr. at a HI-Pal Tournament

Officer Joseph Botelho Jr. at a HI-Pal Tournament

August 2-3 wraps up the two remaining days of the Jimmy Yagi Hoops Camp in which the HI-PAL program and the “Click It Or Ticket” message are featured. This event is being brought forth by the Department of Parks & Recreation with HI-PAL as a supporting sponsor. The events take place at the Panaʻewa Park covered basketball courts for the younger youth, (7-12), and at the Civic Auditorium for the older youth, (13-17).

On August 17, a 3-on-3 basketball tournament will be held at the Honokaʻa Sports Complex gymnasium. This event is open to the following age groups: boys 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, and girls 10 and under, 12 and under, 14 and under. The deadline to complete the registration packet and enter this event is August 12.

On August 31 a “Click It or Ticket” Volleyball Tournament will be held at the Papaʻaloa gymnasium in Laupāhoehoe. Further information on this event will be forthcoming.

Teams interested in participating or anyone needing additional information on these events may call Officer Joseph Botelho Jr. in East Hawaiʻi at 961-2220 or Officer Randy Morris in West Hawaiʻi at 326-4646, extension 258. For information on the Jimmy Yagi Hoops camps, you may call the Parks and Recreation office at 961-8740.

“Click It or Ticket” is a national education and enforcement campaign aimed at increasing seat belt use and decreasing traffic fatalities and injuries. The Hawaiʻi Police Department encourages all youth, teens and adults to use their seat belts

 

Big Island Police Inviting Public to Participate in Anonymous Community Satisfaction Survey

The public is invited to participate in an anonymous Community Satisfaction Survey for the Hawaiʻi Police Department during the month of May.

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Chief Harry Kubojiri said previous Community Satisfaction Surveys helped him identify actions the Police Department could take to increase community satisfaction. “Our partnership with the community is crucial,” Kubojiri said. “This survey is one of the ways we can improve that partnership by incorporating community feedback into our daily operations.”

The internet survey will be open from 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 1, until 4 p.m. Friday, May 31, at www.hawaiipolice.com. It takes about five minutes to complete and is limited to one survey per computer. Participants will be able to enter detailed comments and suggestions at the end of the survey. The respondent’s IP address will not be stored in the survey results.

The responses will be collected and compiled by an outside source. After the survey period, results will be posted on the Police Department’s website.

Newly-Designed Hawaiʻi Police Department Flag to Make Debut in Merrie Monarch Parade

A newly-designed Hawaiʻi Police Department flag will make its debut in the Merrie Monarch parade on Saturday (April 6).

Former Police Commission Chair Pudding Lassiter helps display the Police Department flag designed by Police Records Clerk Danielle Medeiros (seen at right).

Former Police Commission Chair Pudding Lassiter helps display the Police Department flag designed by Police Records Clerk Danielle Medeiros (seen at right).

The design of the flag was chosen in a vote by Police Department employees as the result of a contest open to all sworn and civilian personnel. The winning entry was designed by Police Records Clerk Danielle Medeiros.

Medeiros said the flag’s red, white and blue colors are symbolic of America, with the majority of the background color being blue to represent the Police Department. Five stars at the right represent the department’s five Core Values (integrity, professionalism, compassion, teamwork and community satisfaction) while the words “Serving and protecting with aloha,” summarize the Police Department’s vision statement. The department’s badge at the top corner is meant to bring an official feel, and the flag has an image of Hawaiʻi Island in the center in bold red so it can be visible from afar.

The idea to create an official flag for the Police Department came from former Hawaiʻi County Police Commission Chair Pudding Lassiter. Officers in the Administrative Services Section coordinated the contest, which ended with a vote of three finalist designs. The vote was held January 18-25.

Chief Harry S. Kubojiri said he left the selection of the flag’s design to the employees and purposely abstained from looking at any of the designs until after the contest committee chose the finalists. Even then, the chief chose not to vote in the contest because he wanted the employees to have complete control over which flag would represent their department.

After the contest, the winning flag became the property of the Hawaiʻi Police Department. It will be displayed at department ceremonies and community events.

 

Big Island Police Initiate Investigation of Allegations of Voter Fraud on Hawaii Island

The Hawaiʻi Police Department has initiated an investigation into an allegation of Voter Fraud on Hawaiʻi Island.


The investigation was launched based on information provided by the Hawaiʻi County Office of Elections involving elections conducted in 2010.

Voter Fraud, under section 19.3.5 of the Hawaiʻi Revised Statutes, is a class C felony.

The investigation is being handled by Detectives of the Area I Criminal Investigation Section.

At this time, no other details will be released as it is an active investigation.

Big Island Police Launch New Kuleana Tip Hotline

The Hawaiʻi Police Department has launched a new tool the community can use to help keep our island safe. It’s called the “Kuleana Hotline.”

The Kuleana Hotline is not a substitute for 9-1-1 calls. In an emergency, always call 9-1-1.

The Kuleana Hotline is designed to prevent tragic events in public places, including schools, restaurants and other locations where members of our community gather.

Unlike Crime Stoppers, to which citizens may report information about a specific crime, the Kuleana Hotline is an avenue for reporting something that may not be criminal yet but has the potential to turn disastrous if not prevented.

Many tragedies committed by individuals or organized groups have been preceded by warning signs. We as a community are responsible for notifying the police if we see or hear anything that has the potential to turn into a malicious act.

For example:

  • If you read a post on a social networking site about a person interested in purchasing a firearm and the person signals intent to cause harm with that weapon, call the Kuleana Hotline.
  • If you witness suspicious activity around public buildings, utility companies or bridges, call the Kuleana Hotline.
  • If you see something or someone’s behavior that may seem innocuous but gives you a “funny feeling” in your stomach that something is “just not right,” call the Kuleana Hotline.

Your tip could help authorities intervene before those warning signs develop into a crime or tragedy.

“Kuleana” is the Hawaiian word for “responsibility.” The significance of the hotline’s name is that we are all neighbors living on this island together, and we are all responsible for preventing acts of terror or mass injury.

The number for the Kuleana Hotline is 961-2219. It is not manned around the clock but it allows for callers to provide information by leaving voice mail messages.

Together, we can protect our community from destructive acts.

Hawaii County Police Cell Phone Ban Reminder

The Hawaiʻi Police Department is reminding the public about a county law that limits the use of cell phones while driving.

County Ordinance 09-82A makes it illegal to use a cell phone or other mobile electronic device while driving—except with a hands-free mechanism. The ordinance took effect nearly two years ago, on January 1, 2010.

The ban includes but is not limited to:

  • cell phones.
  • text messaging devices.
  • paging devices.
  • personal digital assistants.
  • laptop computers.
  • video games.
  • digital cameras.

The fine for violating the ordinance starts at $97 and can go up to as much as $500 if the use of a mobile electronic device causes a collision.

Between January 1, 2010, and November 22, 2011, police issued 1,959 citations for use of a mobile electronic device while operating a motor vehicle and 38 for causing an accident while using such a device.

Chief Harry S. Kubojiri said officers continue to make enforcement of this ordinance as high a priority as enforcement of other serious traffic laws. “It is designed to reduce driver distraction and make our roadways safer,” Kubojiri said. “Texting or holding a cell phone while talking can lead to tragic consequences for innocent motorists and pedestrians, as well as for the offending driver.”

The law does not apply to:

emergency responders using a mobile electronic device in the performance of their job.
drivers using two-way radios for work-related duties.
drivers holding a valid amateur radio operator license issued by the FCC and using half-duplex two-way radio.

It does not include audio equipment or equipment installed in a vehicle to provide navigation or emergency assistance to the driver, or video entertainment for back-seat passengers.

According to the ordinance, the use of a cell phone to make an emergency 911 call shall be an “affirmative defense.” That means it is not illegal to make a 911 call on a cell phone but a driver who claims to have been doing so might still be cited and have to prove that a legitimate 911 call was made.