RESULTS: Hawai’i Police Department’s Community Satisfaction Survey

Chief Harry Kubojiri wishes to thank the 608 members of the public who participated in the Hawai’i Police Department’s Community Satisfaction Survey and the news media for helping to attract this record number of participants during the month-long survey in May.

The chief and his staff are in the process of analyzing all the individual comments collected so the Police Department can identify common concerns. The chief will then respond to the most common concerns expressed by the community members and visitors who participated in the survey.

Click to view more results

Click to view more results

The responses to those comments and questions will be posted (along with the questions) on the Police Department’s website. In the meantime, the public may view the survey summary at http://www.hawaiipolice.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Community-Satisfaction-Survey-2013.html..

As in previous surveys, Chief Kubojiri said the survey and follow-up analysis are tools to assist him in

  • identifying problem areas the community is experiencing with the Police Department
  • determining if he can rectify those issues through specific training of Police Department personnel
  • making changes to policies and procedures if necessary
  • clarifying misinformation about laws and/or police practices

“Your feedback in past surveys has allowed us to make changes that were beneficial to the Police Department and the public we serve, and we will continue to publish surveys in the future,” Kubojiri said. “Your input is one of the many tools that we use in our continuing efforts to improve how we provide services to the public.”

In addition to processing comments from the survey, the Police Department will continue to hold monthly public meetings around the island to respond to concerns from the public. Chief Kubojiri encourages community members to attend these public meetings or communicate their concerns or comments using the “Feedback” link on the Police Department’s website.

 

Big Island Police Inviting Public to Participate in Anonymous Community Satisfaction Survey

The public is invited to participate in an anonymous Community Satisfaction Survey for the Hawaiʻi Police Department during the month of May.

HPDBadge

Chief Harry Kubojiri said previous Community Satisfaction Surveys helped him identify actions the Police Department could take to increase community satisfaction. “Our partnership with the community is crucial,” Kubojiri said. “This survey is one of the ways we can improve that partnership by incorporating community feedback into our daily operations.”

The internet survey will be open from 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 1, until 4 p.m. Friday, May 31, at www.hawaiipolice.com. It takes about five minutes to complete and is limited to one survey per computer. Participants will be able to enter detailed comments and suggestions at the end of the survey. The respondent’s IP address will not be stored in the survey results.

The responses will be collected and compiled by an outside source. After the survey period, results will be posted on the Police Department’s website.

Hawaii County Police Commission Nominates New Chair and Vice Chair… Listens to My Police Complaint

Today was a Hawaii County Police Commission meeting and among many things on the agenda was the selection of the Chair and Vice Chair of the Police Commission for 2012.

Click to see the agenda and complaints heard

Kenneth T. Ono out of District 7 was selected as Chair and Carol R. Ignacio out of District 1 as the Vice Chair for the 2012 Commission.

I can only say what districts they currently represent because I don’t know where they live or if the redistricting will affect anyone but what I did notice is that there is still no Commissioner from District 6 (Puna, Kau, South Kona).

Hawaii County Police Chief Harry Kubojiri also gave his reports and specifically talked about the amount of openings that were in the Police County Dispatch program.  He did mention that there are a lot of candidates for the job but the job of a police dispatcher is not as easy as some may think and there are certain qualities that the a dispatcher needs to be able to handle on the job.

Hawaii County Police Chief Harry Kubojiri gives his report to the commission

The Commission then broke into Executive Session to consider discipline and charges against officers or employees of the Hawaii Police Department, to consider sensitive matters relating to public safety, to discuss the evaluation of the Police Chief, and to consult with Corporation Counsel on Questions and issues pertaining to the commission’s powers, duties, privileges, immunities, and liabilities pursuant to HRS 92-5 (a) (2)(4))(6) and the Hawai’i County Charter Section 13-20 (b).

The public was required to sit outside during this portion of the meeting.  There were nine Hawaii Police Complaints to to be heard and mine was heard toward the ending of the commission meeting.

I did the best to explain what happened to me that day.

They didn’t even bother to look at the damages on my body, my hospital bills, or my iPhone

My damaged iPhone 4 as I retrieved it from evidence.

I tried to show them my camera but they really didn’t seem to have any interest it and I didn’t even bother to bring in my damaged clothes… however it is in my police complaint.

Broken Nikon L110

What really… really seemed confusing…. and almost bothersome… was it seemed like the Police Commission didn’t understand the fact that filming folks in public is perfectly legal!

I got asked… why would I want to film a bar fight… why post pictures of it on the internet?  I got asked basically if my blog was a job… and what I did as a Federal Worker.

I guess maybe even the Police Commission themselves don’t realize that filming police doing their jobs in public places is perfectly legal… I sure hope not.

And of course the infamous one where they ask was I taking pictures of folks in their faces… Well the physical evidence and the pictures on the camera speak for themselves!  That and the fact that I forgot to mention to the police commission that Prosecuting Damerville himself even said that the two civilian witnesses in the case were not very reliable witnesses!

Oh and let’s not also forget those three anonymous calls that also went into the prosecutors office after this happened stating I was a sex offender…. and the PROSECUTOR HIMSELF FOUND THAT TO BE FUNNY and Showed me the other Damon Shane Tucker mug shot that these anonymous folks were talking about who is locked up in Arizona until 2062.

While the Prosecutors Office has dismissed my case “in the name of justice”… I still am dealing with the hospital bills, the physical aches, the emotional scars, the damaged iPhone and Camera as well as clothes I was wearing that fateful night.

I still have pain and I don't know if the scars will ever go away!

Let’s hope that the Police Commission will do it’s job accurately and hopefully justice will be served.

Hawaii County Police Cell Phone Ban Reminder

The Hawaiʻi Police Department is reminding the public about a county law that limits the use of cell phones while driving.

County Ordinance 09-82A makes it illegal to use a cell phone or other mobile electronic device while driving—except with a hands-free mechanism. The ordinance took effect nearly two years ago, on January 1, 2010.

The ban includes but is not limited to:

  • cell phones.
  • text messaging devices.
  • paging devices.
  • personal digital assistants.
  • laptop computers.
  • video games.
  • digital cameras.

The fine for violating the ordinance starts at $97 and can go up to as much as $500 if the use of a mobile electronic device causes a collision.

Between January 1, 2010, and November 22, 2011, police issued 1,959 citations for use of a mobile electronic device while operating a motor vehicle and 38 for causing an accident while using such a device.

Chief Harry S. Kubojiri said officers continue to make enforcement of this ordinance as high a priority as enforcement of other serious traffic laws. “It is designed to reduce driver distraction and make our roadways safer,” Kubojiri said. “Texting or holding a cell phone while talking can lead to tragic consequences for innocent motorists and pedestrians, as well as for the offending driver.”

The law does not apply to:

emergency responders using a mobile electronic device in the performance of their job.
drivers using two-way radios for work-related duties.
drivers holding a valid amateur radio operator license issued by the FCC and using half-duplex two-way radio.

It does not include audio equipment or equipment installed in a vehicle to provide navigation or emergency assistance to the driver, or video entertainment for back-seat passengers.

According to the ordinance, the use of a cell phone to make an emergency 911 call shall be an “affirmative defense.” That means it is not illegal to make a 911 call on a cell phone but a driver who claims to have been doing so might still be cited and have to prove that a legitimate 911 call was made.

Captain James O’Connor Promoted to Police Major

Chief Harry Kubojiri has promoted Captain James O’Connor to police major effective October 16.

Captain James O'Connor

O’Connor, who is now in charge of the Internal Affairs and Criminal Intelligence Units, will be assigned to Area II Operations in West Hawaiʻi.

On the same date, Major Randy Apele, now assigned to Area II Operations, will transfer to Area I Operations in East Hawaiʻi.

O’Connor is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. Some of his past assignments include patrol sergeant in Waimea, police lieutenant in charge of the Records and Identification Section, commander of the Special Response Team and police captain in charge of the Kaʻū District.

He joined the Hawaiʻi Police Department in 1993.

Police Officer Saves Person from Drowning… Becomes Officer of the Year

Officer Carrie Akina was named the Big Island’s “Officer of the Year” by the Hawaiʻi State Law Enforcement Officials Association at a banquet at the Hāpuna Beach Prince Hotel on September 23.

Akina received the honor for risking her own personal safety and welfare to rescue a swimmer in distress last November.

While conducting a narcotics investigation at Honl’s Beach on November 19, 2010, Akina observed a struggling swimmer. She immediately notified dispatch and requested Fire Rescue. She then got her personal boogie board out of the trunk of her car and entered the rough surf to rescue the 37-year-old New York man. While on her way to his side, she saw him submerged in the water for short periods of time. She was able to reach him quickly and assist him back to shore.

Patrol officers at the scene concurred that if Officer Akina had not reacted as swiftly and bravely as she did, the victim would have drowned.

Earlier this year, Akina received a Bronze Medal of Merit for her act of bravery. Chief Harry Kubojiri said Akina showed “true character” and demonstrated “great personal courage.