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Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame Announces the 2016 Inductees

The Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame announces the 2016 inductees. The ceremony will take place at the Outrigger Canoe Club on the 23rd August, the eve of what would be the 126th birthday of Duke Kahanamoku, the father of modern surfing.

“The Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame honors legends and celebrates those who help perpetuate the spirit and legacy of Duke Kahanamoku,” notes Bill Pratt, co‐chair of the Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame.

Miss Yokohama greets Hokule'a captain Bruce Blankenfeld when the canoe reached the end of its Voyage to Japan.

Miss Yokohama greets Hokule’a captain Bruce Blankenfeld when the canoe reached the end of its Voyage to Japan.

Bruce Blankenfeld is one of the most influential figures in canoe paddling and Polynesian Voyaging Society.  He is a distinguished pwo navigator and captain of the Polynesian voyaging canoe Hokulea and was the president of Hui Nalu Canoe Club for more than 20 years.

Diane Stowell

Diane Stowell

Diane Stowell is an All-America swimmer at UCLA. She went on to claim more than 100 national and international titles in swimming. Stowell was also a dedicated volunteer in her community, serving on numerous charitable boards and serving as a counselor in the Hawaii prison system.

Paul Strauch, Jr.

Paul Strauch, Jr.

Paul Strauch, Jr. was one of the most influential figures in the world of surfing back in the 1960s. Founder of the “Cheater Five” and the first to use bottom turns in large waves, Strauch won numerous surfing titles and was a member of the prestigious Duke Kahanamoku Surf Team.

Sharron Weber

Sharron Weber

Sharron Weber is a two-time world surfing champion and member of the Surfing Walk of Fame. Weber is also known today as a leader in her community. Weber was recently bestowed with the prestigious Kauai Living Treasures Award, given for her lifetime commitment and kokua to her community.

The Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame awards dinner will recognize the honorees, and it will raise money for Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation’s (ODKF) college scholarships and athletic grants program.

Since its inception in 1986, ODKF has gifted more than 2.5 million dollars to scholar athletes and non‐profit organizations in Hawaii. Past Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame inductees include Duke Kahanamoku, Eddie Aikau, Fred Hemmings, Mark Cunningham, Randy Rarick, Duane DeSoto and much more.

Hawaii Waterman’s Hall of Fame Next Week

C4 Waterman co-founders, Brian Keaulana and Archie Kalepa join the list of world-renowned watermen and women when they are honored by the Duke Kahanamoku Hawaii Waterman’s Hall of Fame on Thursday, August 23rd at the Waikiki Outrigger Canoe Club.

The Waterman’s Hall of Fame acknowledges recipient’s legacies and all that they have represented to Hawai‘i’s ocean sports community. Other recipients this year include famed big-wave surfer and oceanographer Ricky Grigg and Michael Tongg, an instrumental leader in the growth of canoe paddling statewide.

C4 Waterman co-founders, Brian Keaulana and Archie Kalepa

“I am really proud of Brian and Archie and I could not think of any one more deserving of this honor,” said friend and business partner Todd Bradley. “They have spent a lifetime dedicated to the ocean and have made significant impact in not just their community but the surf, rescue and movie industry as well.”

The Hawai‘i Waterman Hall of Fame Awards Dinner is presented by the Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation (ODKF) and Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Along with paying tribute to the new Hall of Fame honorees, the evening’s festivities will feature a concert by Henry Kapono and music by Maunalua.

“We are honoring truly remarkable watermen who have meant so much to modern-day ocean sports in Hawai‘i and whose influence is seen in generations of young people throughout our islands,” said Tim Guard, event co-chair and ODKF board member.

Table sponsorships seating eight are available for $3,500, $2,500, and $1,000, with individual seats at $65 each. Net proceeds raised will benefit ODKF’s college scholarships and athletic grants program. Tickets and information are available at www.DukeFoundation.org.

The Hawai‘i Waterman Hall of Fame was initiated in 2010 to create a lasting tribute to the Hawaiian Islands’ water sports legacy and honor the achievements of Hawai‘i’s standout watermen and waterwomen. The criteria used to select inductees are:

• Keiki o ka ‘äina / keiki o ke kai

• Sustained outstanding contribution to the sport

• International, national and local accomplishment and recognition

Past Hawai‘i Waterman Hall of Fame honorees include Duke Kahanamoku, Eddie Aikau, Wally Froiseth, Fred Hemmings, Buffalo Keaulana, Rabbit Kekai, Keo Nakama, Nappy Napoleon, Rell Sunn, Peter Cole, Ethel Kukea, Aileen Soule, and Nainoa Thompson.

“You Asked For It” 1951 Johnny Ukulele and Parker Ranch

“You Asked For It” was an early “reality” tv show where people would send in requests to see strange things. We posted another clip from it that had a Therimin player on it. In this one a woman from Texas writes in wanting to see one of these Hawaiian cowboys her husband had seen while in the service. This leads to Johnny Ukulele’s spot. He is from a noble Hawaiian family and as a teenager traveled to America to play in a band touring with famed surfer Duke Kahanamoku.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/wvVxUuHYqwY]

He liked it so much he stayed for thirty years touring the country spreading the sounds of the islands. He spent a lot of the time in the midwest and one of his biggest fans was Al Capones brother Ralph who gave a suite in one of the mobs hotels.

Johnny was also an expert swimmer who competed against Johnny Weismuller and Buster Crabbe and others. He cut one lp on Capitol in the late 50’sit wouldn’t be until 1961 that he would finally return to Hawaii. After returning to the mainland he became a fixture in Vegas until his death in 1971.

Health and Medicine Among Contemporary American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians, is Opening at the National Library of Medicine

A new exhibition examining concepts of health and medicine among contemporary American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians, is opening at the National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, explores the connection between wellness, illness, and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people, artwork, objects, and interactive media.

National Library of Medicine opens new interactive exhibition Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness first of its kind

Opening events will be held Oct. 5, 2011 and will include ceremonial dancing and the blessing of a healing totem pole that was created for the exhibition and installed in front of the Library. The program will begin at 10:30 a.m. in the auditorium of the Lister Hill Center (Building 38A) on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md. At 11:45 a.m., events move to the front of the Library (Building 38) for the blessing of the healing totem pole and the exhibition, and for the exhibition ribbon-cutting. Native Voices opens to the public Oct. 6.

The National Library of Medicine has a history of working with Native communities as part of the Library’s commitment to make health information resources accessible to people no matter where they live or work. The Native Voices exhibition concept grew out of meetings with Native leaders in Alaska, Hawaii and the contiguous United States.

“This exhibition honors the Native tradition of oral history and establishes a unique collection of information,” says Donald A.B. Lindberg, MD, director of the National Library of Medicine. “We hope visitors will find Native Voices educational and inspirational, and we hope Native people will view it with pride. The Library is excited to open this exhibition, and to do it during our 175th anniversary year.”

Topics featured in the exhibition include: Native views of land, food, community, earth/nature, and spirituality as they relate to Native health; the relationship between traditional healing and Western medicine in Native communities; economic and cultural issues that affect the health of Native communities; efforts by Native communities to improve health conditions; and the role of Native Americans in military service and healing support for returning Native veterans.

The Hokulea courtesy of Herb Kawainui Kane and the movie "The Voyagers"

In addition to the collection of interviews, here are some of the objects visitors will find in the exhibition:

  • In the lobby of the Library, guiding people into the exhibition, is a 10-foot model of the Hokule‘a, a traditional Hawaiian voyaging canoe used for long-distance travel. Visitors will learn how the mission of the Hokule‘a has spurred a Hawaiian cultural and health revival.
  • Inside the exhibition, in a section that explores Native games for survival, strength and sports, visitors will find a vintage surfboard and learn about Native Hawaiian sportsman Duke Kahanamoku, who won Olympic medals in swimming and revived the sport of surfboarding.
  • Ceremonial drums, pipes, and rattles from the Upper Plains Indians grace a section on healing.
  • A World War II radio is one object that helps tell the story of Navajo and other American Indian Code Talkers. Visitors will learn about their service to the country and the ceremonies performed by traditional healers to help relieve combat-related stress experienced by returning veterans.
  • The 20-foot healing totem pole created by master carver Jewell Praying Wolf James and the House of Tears Carvers of the Lummi Nation in the Pacific Northwest is located in the herb garden in front of the Library. Visitors will discover the meaning of the stories, symbols and colors on the totem pole and two benches that accompany it. In the weeks preceding the exhibition opening, the totem received blessings from a number of tribes as it was transported across the country to be permanently installed at the Library. Previous work by carver Jewell James includes healing totems to honor the victims of the September 11th attacks. Those totems are now installed in Arrow Park in New York, in Shanksville, Pennsylvania and at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, DC.

To make the Native Voices information accessible to people who can’t come to the Library, there is an online version of the exhibition at www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices. The Library hopes to develop a travelling version consisting of a series of banners with information.

For people interested in Native health issues in general, the Library’s collection of free online information contains material on Native health including:

Amelia Earhart Exhibit Opens This Weekend at the Pacific Aviation Museum

The Amelia Earhart Exhibit opens up this weekend at the Pacific Aviation Museum on what would have been her birthday.

Amelia Earhardt and Duke Kanahamoku

Amelia Earhart and Duke Kanahamoku (Photo provided by the Pacific Aviation Museum)

Lind Collection Features Photos From Duke Kahanamoku Funeral

I’m not sure when Ian Lind posted his latest album on his website of the Duke Kahanamoku funeral, however, it does give a glimpse of what a REALLY BIG ocean  “Ash Scattering” looks like.

The last time I attended a scattering of ashes at Waikiki, was about 4-5 years ago when my wifes uncle Zulu’s ashes were scattered off Waikiki.

Here is just one picture from Dukes Funeral featured on Lind’s Site:

Crowd Gathers to Scatter Duke Kahanamoku's Ashes

Crowd Gathers to Scatter Duke Kahanamoku's Ashes