Hulihe‘e Event Marks 40th Anniversary of Palace Band, Glee Club

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 12 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

The performance marks the 40th anniversary of the Hulihe’e Palace Band and the Merrie Monarchs glee club. The two organizations were founded in 1976 by the late bandmaster Bud Dant and the late palace curator and performer, Aunty Lei Collins.

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu then he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Jolee Chip, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.

Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday- Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Palace Event Remembers Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka’ahumanu

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe’e on Sunday, Mar. 15. The 4 p.m. event on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace remembers the late Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.  Photo by Fern Gavalek

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 15 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Photo by Fern Gavalek

The event presents the Merrie Monarchs, the Hulihe‘e Palace West Hawai‘i County Band and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Known as the Citizen Prince, Kuhio was born on Kaua‘i and raised by his aunt and uncle, Queen Kapiolani and King Kalakaua, to become successor to the royal throne. After Hawai‘i became a U.S. territory, the Republican Party persuaded Kuhio to enter politics.

Kuhio was named Hawai‘i’s second delegate to the U.S. Congress in 1902 and served the post 10 times. Honored today as the father of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kuhio secured an area of Hawai‘i Island’s Kilauea Volcano in 1916 for public enjoyment. He was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission.

Queen Ka‘ahumanu, who hailed from Hana, Maui, was the favorite wife of Kamehameha the Great.  Though much younger than her husband, Ka‘ahumanu was charismatic, intelligent and politically shrewd. Kamehameha granted her the title of kuhina nui (queen regent) upon his death in 1819. Tired of the Hawaiian laws of kapu that forbade women from certain activities, she convinced the throne’s successor, Liholiho, to overturn the kapu system.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2015 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace West Hawai‘i County Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Palace Event Remembers King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli”

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, August 18 to remember the late King Kamehameha III, “Kauikeaouli.” The fun is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures.

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862. Keywords: Royalty Description: Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma. Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince. Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Prince of Hawaii, 1858-1862.
Son of Kamehameha IV and Emma.
Charcoal artwork by J. Ewing, on a photograph by J.J. Williams of a painting of the Prince.
Owner: Hawaii State Archives

Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. Donations are appreciated; kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

“Born in 1813, Kauikeaouli was the second surviving son of Kamehameha the Great and he became king when he was 11 years old,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “During his 30-year reign, he signed the Great Mahele, dividing land among his people; declared the right of religious freedom and instituted the kingdom’s first written constitution.”

In 1843, King Kamehameha III coined Hawai‘i’s motto that appears on the state seal and coat of arms: “`Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono-the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.” The monarch was born at Keauhou Bay and a plaque there marks the birth site.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

Hulihee Palace Debuts Monthly Oceanside Tea

With a setting and menu befitting of royalty, Hulihe‘e Palace offers a monthly Wilhelmina’s Tea. Served on fine china on the palace’s picturesque oceanside lanai, the 10 a.m. tea includes a hearty array of ribbon sandwiches, scones and tasty tidbits, plus a 45-minute guided tour of Hulihe’e Palace.

Huli Tea

Presented by the Daughters of Hawaii and the Calabash Cousins, the new activity raises funds to purchase Apple iPads for use by visiting students. The two-hour tea is priced at $35 and includes a take-home, mini chocolate Bundt cake favor.

Dates for Wilhelmina’s Tea in 2013 are June 10, July 22, August 19, September 16, October 21, November 18 and December 16. Teas are held the Monday following Afternoon at Hulihe’e during the monthly Kokua Kailua Village Stroll.

Holualoa resident Faye Daniel came up with the idea for the tea as a tribute to her grandmother, an accomplished horsewoman and the first pa’u rider to represent the Territory of Hawai‘i at the California Floral Parade, the precursor to the Tournament of Roses Parade,

“My grandmother Wilhelmina would take me to tea on Sunday at the Wai‘ahole Tea Room on O’ahu,” recalls Daniel, a Daughter of Hawai‘i member. “This tea is a tribute to the memory of a remarkable woman and a true Daughter of Hawai‘i.”

While Daughters and Cousins create the lavish tea fare, Daniel’s brothers provide the delicious shortbread cookies—a family recipe—and the favors. Adding an island twist, homemade lilikoi jam is served with the scones, rather than the traditional clotted cream.

Daniel’s polished Grand Baroque silver tea pot is used to serve the Constant Comment tea and attendees enjoy tea service on an eclectic mix of pretty cups and dishes, all donated by Daughters and Cousins—each contributor’s name appears on the reverse side.

Other palace volunteers who organize the tea and serve guests are Lolly Davis, Sally Inkster, Denise Rosso and Shan Quinn.

“We’re all retired teachers and do this to raise funds so visiting students can have the use of iPads,” details Daniel. “When they’re looking at an artifact here, they can pull it up on Goggle for more info. That’s how you teach kids now.”

The Daughters mentor middle school students, teaching them about Hulihe‘e Palace, the Hawaiian monarchy and culture.

Wilhelmina’s Tea is limited to 20 guests and non-refundable reservations are required; phone 808-329-9555.

Hulihe‘e Palace: Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village Stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

 

 

Hulihe‘e Palace Honors Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs accompanied by the Hulihe‘e Palace Band. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu.  Photo by Fern Gavalek

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, Mar. 17 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember Prince Kuhio and Queen Ka‘ahumanu. Photo by Fern Gavalek

Known as the Citizen Prince, Kuhio was born on Kaua‘i and raised by his aunt and uncle, Queen Kapiolani and King Kalakaua, to become successor to the royal throne. After Hawai‘i became a U.S. territory, the Republican Party persuaded Kuhio to enter politics

Kuhio was named Hawai‘i’s second delegate to the U.S. Congress in 1902 and served the post 10 times. Honored today as the father of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Kuhio secured an area of Hawai‘i Island’s Kilauea Volcano in 1916 for public enjoyment. He was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission.

Queen Ka‘ahumanu, who hailed from Hana, Maui, was the favorite wife of Kamehameha the Great.  Though much younger than her husband, Ka‘ahumanu was charismatic, intelligent and politically shrewd. Kamehameha granted her the title of kuhina nui (queen regent) upon his death in 1819. Tired of the Hawaiian laws of kapu that forbade women from certain activities, she convinced the throne’s successor, Liholiho, to overturn the kapu system.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 

 

Hawaii Tourism Authority Presents its 2012 Legacy Awards

The Hawai‘i Tourism Authority (HTA), the state’s tourism agency, presented the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace with its 2012 Tourism Legacy Awards, in recognition of both organizations’ established lifelong efforts in perpetuating the Hawaiian culture and sustaining a “legacy of aloha”.

Daughters of Hawaii

“As the only state with a monarchy history, the dedicated efforts of these organizations to recognize Hawai‘i’s ali‘i and their legacy is a testament to the vital importance of historical preservation for Hawai‘i,” said Mike McCartney, president and CEO of the HTA. “Mahalo and congratulations to the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace for their commitment and dedication in honoring, preserving and perpetuating the Hawaiian culture and history. Their work is important to our community, our residents, visitors and future generations.”

At yesterday’s Hawai‘i Tourism Conference, the HTA’s 2012 Tourism Legacy Awards were presented to:
The Daughters of Hawai‘i is a nonprofit organization founded in 1903 “to perpetuate the memory and spirit of old Hawai‘i and of historic facts, and to preserve the nomenclature and correct pronunciation of the Hawaiian language.” The Daughters are one of the first organizations in Hawai‘i to recognize the importance of historical preservation. The organization owns and maintains the Queen Emma Summer Palace, the Hulihe‘e Palace and the site of Kamehameha III’s birth at Keauhou Bay in Kona on Hawai‘i Island. Through their collective efforts, the Daughters of Hawai‘i conserved these significant historical sites for generations of locals and visitors.

The Friends of ‘Iolani Palace was established “to preserve, restore, interpret, share and celebrate the unique cultural, historical, and spiritual qualities of ‘Iolani Palace and its grounds for the benefit of native Hawaiians, the people of Hawai‘i and the world.” Designated as a national historic landmark and as the only royal palace in the U.S., ‘Iolani Palace embodies Hawaiian cultural heritage and offers genuine opportunities for residents and visitors to experience our host culture.

The Tourism Legacy Awards, evolving from the Keep It Hawai‘i program, was established by the HTA to honor individuals, organizations and businesses that perpetuate the Hawaiian culture and traditions. Honorees have worked diligently to nurture the host culture creating respectful and authentic visitor experiences while securing bonds between the visitor industry and the Hawaiian community. Previous honorees included the late Dr. George Kanahele and the Bishop Museum.

The Hawai‘i Tourism Authority is a state agency established by law in 1998 to ensure a successful visitor industry and tourism economy in the state of Hawai‘i. As the state’s tourism authority, its mission is to strategically manage tourism to optimize benefits for Hawai‘i, integrating the interests of visitors, the community and visitor industry. Through the implementation of the statewide Hawai‘i Tourism Strategic Plan and HTA’s own strategic plan, the authority works to direct Hawai‘i tourism in a sustainable manner consistent with our economic goals, cultural values, preservation of natural resources, community desires, community desires, and visitor industry needs. For more information on the HTA, please visit

Hulihe’e Palace Annual Spring Fundraiser – Day at Hulihe‘e

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 24. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Debuting at the fundraiser is the new cookbook, “Just Like Tutu Made With Love,” which features recipes from palace volunteers and supporters. The handy resource contains instructions for main dishes, salads, pupu, tropical beverages and desserts. It also has helpful everyday hints “for living happily” sprinkled among the pages. It will be available for $9.38 including tax.

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment. Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March, Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual statewide holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Monday, Mar. 26 in 2012. Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hulihe‘e Palace Concert Remembers King Who Founded Queen’s Medical Center

Media Release:

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present a free outdoor concert 4 p.m. Sunday, May 15 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late King Kamehameha IV. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i.

Hulihe‘e Palace

The concert is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho) was 21 when he inherited the throne in 1855. He agonized over the dwindling native population that was reduced from 300,000 in 1778 to 70,000 in 1855. “Hawaiians had no resistance to the diseases of foreigners and over 6,000 caught smallpox brought to the islands in 1853,” says Fanny Au Hoy, Hulihe‘e Palace docent coordinator. “The king and his Queen Emma pushed for the building of a hospital so Hawaiians could get adequate medical care.”

Hulihe‘e Palace

Liholiho married Emma Naea Rooke in 1856. She was the granddaughter of John Young, Kamehameha’s British advisor and great-granddaughter of Kamehameha’s brother, Keli‘imaika‘i. As was the custom for children in Hawai‘i to be given to relatives for upbringing, Emma was the hanai  (adopted) daughter of Dr. T. C. Rooke, an English physician practicing in Honolulu, and Emma’s Aunt Grace. Brought up by a physician, Emma shared her husband’s values on health.

“Besides providing personal funds, the royal couple earnestly solicited donations from others,” explains Au Hoy. “In 1860, Kamehameha IV laid the cornerstone for the Queen’s Hospital, which he named to honor his wife.” Today, it is the prestigious Queen’s Medical Center in downtown Honolulu.

Liholiho and his young family visited Hulihe‘e Palace several times, favoring the seaside royal residence for off-island vacations from Honolulu’s busy pace. They also spent time on Kaua‘i  near Hanalei and the area was named Princeville after the couple’s son, Prince Albert.

Hulihe‘e Palace

The king died when he was 29, a short time after Prince Albert became fatally ill. “Queen Emma became a candidate to the throne in 1874 but lost a heavily contested election to Prince David Kalakaua,” says Au Hoy. Queen Emma died at the age of 49 in 1885.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours.

Due to damage from the March tsunami, the gift shop remains closed for repairs and donations are greatly appreciated. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

 2011 Hulihe‘e Palace Concert Schedule: 4 p.m. on the palace grounds

  • Jan 16: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha II “Lunalilo” and Aunty I’olani Luahine
  • Feb 20: Band Concert remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 20: Hula Concert remembering Queen Ka’ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 17: Hula Concert remembering Prince Albert
  • May 15: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 12: Band Concert remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 17: Hula Concert remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 14: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 18: Band Concert remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 16: Hula Concert remembering Princess Kai‘ulani
  • Nov 20: Band Concert remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 18: Hula Concert remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Palace Performance Honors ‘Merrie Monarch’

Media Release:

The Daughters of Hawai‘i present a free concert 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21 at Hulihe‘e Palace to honor King David Kalakaua (1836-1891), former palace curator Aunty Lei Collins and bandmaster Charles ‘Bud’ Dant. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his hula halau, Na Pua Ui O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

The brother of Queen Lili‘uokalani, Kalakaua became king by election, rather than birthright, in 1874. He was from a long line of chiefs from the island of Hawai‘i; his queen was Kapiolani.

“During Kalakaua’s reign, music thrived due to royal patronage,” says Fanny Au Hoy, docent coordinator. “He loved the performing arts, especially music.”

The king played the piano and composed chants and mele (songs) in both Hawaiian and English. Nicknamed the “Merrie Monarch,” Kalakaua also embraced Western music and promoted the playing of the ‘ukulele. He composed the words to the kingdom’s national anthem, “Hawai‘i Pono‘i,” which was set to music by his Royal Hawaiian Band.

“Kalakaua was a Renaissance man for Hawaiian arts,” adds Au Hoy. “Kalakaua felt the political survival of his kingdom depended upon the cultural revitalization of the Hawaiian people. He included mele oli (chant) and hula in the king’s 1883 coronation and 1886 jubilee.

“The king enjoyed visiting Kona, bought Hulihe‘e Palace and remodeled it,” explains Au Hoy. “He stuccoed the exterior, plastered the interior and enlarged the ocean lanai. The home took on a Victorian air with crown and gold leaf picture moldings and crystal chandeliers. Ever the Merrie Monarch, Kalakaua furnished Hulihe‘e with the finery needed for entertaining: china, glassware, satin cushions, rugs and paintings.”

Kalakaua visited Washington, D.C. and brought about a reciprocity treaty of duty-free commerce with the U.S. He also sailed around the world in 1881 to promote Hawai‘i’s sugar industry. During this period, different countries attempted to take control of several Pacific islands. A group of foreigners, with the help of a military unit, forced the king to sign the Bayonet Constitution in 1887, taking away most of his power. Kalakaua died in 1891 on a trip to San Francisco and Lili‘uokalani, his regent, became queen.

After closing for earthquake repairs in December 2007, Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2010 Hulihe‘e Palace Concert Schedule:  4 p.m. on the palace grounds

  • Jan 17: Band Concert remembering King Kamehameha II “Lunalilo” and Aunty I’olani Luahine
  • Feb 21: Hula Concert remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 21: Band Concert remembering Queen Ka’ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 18: Hula Concert remembering Prince Albert
  • May 16: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 13: Band Concert remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 18: Hula Concert remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 22: Hula Concert remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 19: Band Concert remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 17: Hula Concert remembering Princess Kai‘ulani
  • Nov 21: Band Concert remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 12: Hula Concert remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Outdoor Concert Remembers Former Palace Resident… Sunday, 2/21/10

Media Release:

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins present a free concert 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i.  Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Concert goers are encouraged to take advantage of the free “chair check” conveniently located across from the palace and enjoy the Kokua Kailua Village Stroll from 1-6 p.m. During the Village Stroll, Ali’i Drive is turned into a pedestrian mall and musicians and artists take to the street in a fun and festive family atmosphere. Kokua Kailua is sponsored by four local business organizations, Hulihe‘e Palace and Pacific Radio Group.

Princess Ruth (1826-1883) was the half-sister of King Kamehameha IV and V. She inherited Hulihe‘e after the death of her husband, William Pitt Leleiohoku; he was the adopted son of John Adams Kuakini. Kuakini built the palace after erecting Moku‘aikaua Church, which faces the palace on Ali‘i Drive.

A tall woman of great girth, Princess Ruth outlived all of her husbands and children. Ancient Hawaiians, who were known for their statuesque presence, saw beauty in great size. “Ruth used the palace for entertaining her royal kin but preferred to sleep in a grass house she had built on the palace grounds,” says Fanny Au Hoy, palace administrator.  “During Ruth’s time of ownership, the palace was often visited by her sister-in-law, Queen Emma. The monarchs considered Hulihe‘e a lovely vacation spot away from the diplomatic pressures in Honolulu.”

After closing for earthquake repairs in December 2007, Hulihe‘e Palace reopened for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.